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News: 2002 the year of Java on Wireless?

  1. 2002 the year of Java on Wireless? (9 messages)

    Giga VP Carl Zetie suggests that 2002 may finally be the breakout year for Java on mobile devices. "If all goes well, by the end of 2002 we could be seeing Java deployed on millions of PDAs and tens of millions of phones." Along with the growth of J2ME will be the growth of J2EE to support backend infrastructure for thin-client wireless applications.

    Read Whatever Happened To Baby Java?.

    Threaded Messages (9)

  2. I usually do not trust the Data Research companies like Giga, Dataquest etc.,

    They make usually all kinds of thoughless statements to get mention in the newspapers.

    Do not bother with these companies.

  3. 2002 the year of Java on Wireless?[ Go to top ]

    I wouldn't be so quick to discount this information. There is tremendous momentum in the java wireless sector. One small company might play an interesting role in it.



    http://savaje.com/ = J2SE in handhelds

  4. Though I'm not 100% sure about this it seems Java wireless/J2ME came very silently... just the opposite to J2EE ;-)
    But if we have a look: iMode is Java based, all new WinCE computers (PocketPC 2002) have a JVM with them (HP Chai, Jeode, ...), Palm has a JVM, the Nokia Communicator, close to every mobile/wireless device has Java on board now... and even more are coming!

    regards

    Messi
  5. 2002 the year of Java on Wireless?[ Go to top ]

    Here's a little information about the Java applet addition (introduced late Jan 2001):

    http://www.eurotechnology.com/imode/faq-java.html

    iMode does not seem to be Java-based, but you can develop applets that are deployable to the device. It looks like iMode will be available in Europe (perhaps merged with the current WAP infrastructure), not sure about the US though...

    Lee.
  6. can u plz tell me from where i can find the tutorial and related material on j2me
  7. "If all goes well, by the end of 2002 we could be seeing Java deployed on millions of PDAs and tens of millions of phones."

    That would have been a gamble to publish two years ago. At this point in time, it is impossible to conceive otherwise ... those numbers are quite conservative and may be hit easily by the end of the Q1/02 (if not already) from some estimates that I've seen. One example from ZDNet: "Nokia has also made a heavy commitment to Java. It plans to manufacture 100 million Java phones next year, for example, said Nokia spokesman Keith Nowak."

    Peace,

    Cameron.
  8. 2002 the year of Java on Wireless?[ Go to top ]

    Would that mean that we should leave HTML for JFC ???
  9. 2002 the year of Java on Wireless?[ Go to top ]

    Leading IT infrastructure companies to support open mobile architecture initiative to drive mobile software and services market

    BEA Systems, Inc., Borland Software Corporation, Hewlett-Packard Company, IBM, Oracle and Sun Microsystems, Inc., the leading IT infrastructure and application server vendors, today announced their support for the open mobile architecture initiative, reflecting growing endorsement of an open standards based mobile architecture that will drive the adoption of mobile software and services. These companies plan to work closely together with the mobile communications industry to leverage web applications in the mobile context and bring mobile extensions to the fixed Internet infrastructure.

    The companies intend to focus on creating interoperable server solutions for service providers, corporations and mobile operators. Joint specifications will be developed in full compliance with the guidelines provided by the relevant industry standardization bodies.

    The IT industry's commitment to the open mobile architecture initiative marks the beginning of the next phase of mobile services, by incorporating a mobile extension for Java(TM) 2 Platform Enterprise Edition (J2EE) based application servers. This effort will lead to the development of uniform mobile application programming interfaces (APIs), providing developers with optimal tools for incorporating mobility in their applications and thus fuel worldwide growth of mobile services and third-party software innovation.

    More at http://press.nokia.com/PR/200112/843870_5.html
  10. Comment on Nokia OMA initiative from Java Developers Journal:-

    When BEA Systems, IBM, HP, Borland, Oracle, and Sun Microsystems combine forces, there can only be one reason...and it isn't just mutual admiration.

    This "Six Pack" of software giants has just joined the so-called Open Mobile Architecture initiative, or OMA, under the terms of which these global companies, inspired by the lead of Finnish phone dynamo Nokia last month,
    now agree to work together to facilitate the creation of mobile services - by standardizing how mobile devices connect to the Internet.

    One notable giant is missing from the OMA line-up to date...Microsoft Corp.

    Given that Nokia claims it will ship some 50 million Java-enabled phones in 2002 alone, it's clear to most industry experts that OMA might just as well stand for the Outmaneuver Microsoft Alliance, because the group of companies specifically seeks to facilitate the creation of mobile services using Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) application servers. That's to say Java, not Windows/NT.

    The OMA initiative reflects growing endorsement of an open standards-based mobile architecture rather than one based on any particular proprietary standard such as a company with a yen for such things might otherwise seek
    to develop. What Nokia, BEA, IBM, HP, Borland, Oracle, and Sun seek is above all to drive the adoption of mobile software and services by leveraging Web applications in the mobile context and by bringing mobile extensions - for
    example, J2EE extensions - to the fixed Internet infrastructure.

    More at http://www.sys-con.com/java/article.cfm?id=1259