Discussions

News: J2EE and .NET Interoperability without Web Services?

  1. A little known aspect of Microsoft's .NET framework is its support for a binary wire protocol called .NET remoting. Ja.NET, a newly released product from Intrinsyc Software talks to the protocol from Java, meaning that Java objects including EJBs can now seamlessly interact with the .NET framework. Given this 'on the wire' interoperability, who needs Web Services?

    An evaluation copy is freely downloadable: http://www.intrinsyc.com/jaNET/.

    -------------------------------------
    Released this week, Ja.NET incorporates a pure Java implementation of Microsoft's .NET Remoting protocol, meaning that the integration is much tighter and cleaner than simple SOAP (you can pass object references, make callbacks, etc.)

    You can use Ja.NET to access EJBs and other Java objects from a .NET client, as though they were written in C#. It also works in the other direction, allowing access to .NET components from Java clients.

    The extensive documentation includes examples of using Ja.NET with many application servers, including BEA WebLogic, IBM WebSphere, Oracle 9i, iPlanet, Borland Enterprise server and JBoss.

    An evaluation copy is freely downloadable: http://www.intrinsyc.com/jaNET/
  2. ...if only interoperating between Java and .NET was the only enterprise integration need...
  3. <quote>Given this 'on the wire' interoperability, who needs Web Services?</quote>

    Like the post prior to this one noted, web services are necessary for interop between more than just Java and .NET. If you believe the hype Microsoft and Sun are putting out there, then you're going to fall into the trap of thinking that J2EE and .NET are the only technologies that matter, which just isn't true. Go ask the Perl, PHP, Python, Cold Fusion, etc. developer if they think web services are only for J2EE and .NET. I think you'll get a completely different story than the one Sun and Microsoft are telling people in their marketing material. In fact, dare I say it, the outsiders (those not using J2EE or .NET) are probably doing just as much, if not more, real world work in the area of web services. Look no further than http://radio.userland.com/ for a perfect example. (And, let's not forget the great work that Apple has done to provide AppleScript with SOAP and XML-RPC capabilities -- built right into the OS! How's that Sun and Microsoft?)
  4. Re. Apples support of web services. Would you like to write a short article on the subject? We certainly hear very little about Macs. I may even get my old apple out of the attic and see if it still works!

    Like Pepsi and Coke, if Sun and MSFT may enough noise, no one will consider other platforms...

    Jonathan Stephenson, CBDIForum.com
  5. "Like the post prior to this one noted, web services are necessary for interop between more than just Java and .NET. If you believe the hype Microsoft and Sun are putting out there, then you're going to fall into the trap of thinking that J2EE and .NET are the only technologies that matter, which just isn't true."

    Yup. It's everything to everything connectivity, that's the best thing about it!

    The Perl implementation seems particularly nice and concise.
  6. I was just wondering how transactions will be handled. I would like to believe that say, when a java client starts a transaction using JTA, the context is somehow valid when the "invocation" is received at the .NET server component. So this Ja.net whatever should allow for that, right? I mean map to an (do they still use MTS in the MS world?) transaction controlled by the .NET infrastructure.

    And vice-versa of course...

    I would like to give it a whirl if for no reason to see if it works.
  7. Ja.NET is just another service layer-intermediate
    protocol/service(look at windows release,GenService description).
    Java/.NET perfectly interoperate on soap layer in most cases.
  8. .NET remoting (v1 at least) doesn't support transaction propagation. However, MTS does support XA transaction managers, therefore it should be possible for JA.NET to marshal the XA transaction into an OLE transaction in the Microsoft world ...
  9. Intrinsyc Software is proud to announce the latest addition to its popular J-Integra Interoperabilty Suite... J-Integra Espresso! J-Integra Espresso is a true CORBA solution for the Microsoft .NET framework. This Object Request Broker (ORB) has been written in C# and connects Java and CORBA with the .NET world. J-Integra Espresso has been developed entirely as managed code and can therefore be accessed by all .NET languages (C#, ASP.NET, etc...).

    J-Integra Espresso features:
    * Pure .NET implementation, 100% managed code
    * Bi-directional: .NET to Java/CORBA and Java/CORBA to .NET
    * Enables interoperability with any J2EE or CORBA infrastructure that is IIOP-compliant such as VisiBroker, Orbix, JacORB, JBoss, WebLogic, and WebSphere
    * Support for IIOP transport protocols including SSL and TLS over IIOP (SSLIOP)
    * Marshalling objects by reference or by value
    * One-sided deployment (no touch on J2EE AppServer)

    For more information, visit our website at http://j-integra.intrinsyc.com/

    Regards,

    Shane Sauer
    Intrinsyc Software International, Inc.
    J-Integra Interoperability Solutions
    http://j-integra.intrinsyc.com/
    When Web Services are not enough
  10. I suppose this is good news for .NET people. Now they have a way of using the biz logic layer from asp.net.
  11. Well does this mean that you can stick to ASP.NET in your web tier and EJB for the application server?

    The heavy lifting is done by the Java developers who are surely more experienced that the .NET ones. Keep the script kiddies away from java at all costs.
  12. I would like to ask just one question here in context of.NET remoting. If SOAP is the silver bullet and Web Services is the future of the world, like MS and other big companies pretending since last one year, then why .NET remoting. Any retionale behind it, or again they are goofing us like they always do :)

    RJ
  13. Intrinsyc Software is proud to announce the latest addition to its popular J-Integra

    Interoperabilty Suite... J-Integra Espresso! J-Integra Espresso is a true CORBA solution

    for the Microsoft .NET framework. This Object Request Broker (ORB) has been written in C#

    and connects Java and CORBA with the .NET world. J-Integra Espresso has been developed

    entirely as managed code and can therefore be accessed by all .NET languages (C#,

    ASP.NET, etc...).

    J-Integra Espresso features:
    * Pure .NET implementation, 100% managed code
    * Bi-directional: .NET to Java/CORBA and Java/CORBA to .NET
    * Enables interoperability with any J2EE or CORBA infrastructure that is IIOP-compliant

    such as VisiBroker, Orbix, JacORB, JBoss, WebLogic, and WebSphere
    * Support for IIOP transport protocols including SSL and TLS over IIOP (SSLIOP)
    * Marshalling objects by reference or by value
    * One-sided deployment (no touch on J2EE AppServer)

    For a free evaluation, visit our website at http://j-integra.intrinsyc.com/

    Regards,

    Shane Sauer
    Intrinsyc Software International, Inc.
    J-Integra Interoperability Solutions
    http://j-integra.intrinsyc.com/
    When Web Services are not enough