Discussions

News: Sun Launches J2EE Application Verification Program

  1. Sun has announced the Java Verification Program for J2EE applications. The program is a similar to J2EE Server certification: If you are an ISV and have a J2EE-based product that passes the J2EE Application Verification kit, you can become a Verification program licensee and put a 'Java Verified' logo on your product, letting people know that your product is portable across any J2EE server.

    Developers can also use the Application Verification Kit for free to test their applications.

    Check out the Sun Verification Program.

    Read Sun launches J2EE certification program; Sun Rolls Out Java Verification Program; or Sun's Press Release.

    Threaded Messages (18)

  2. I wonder when will SunOne Application Server (iPlanet AS)
    pass this test. Neither current (6.5) nor previous version
    have been J2EE compliant.

    Artur...
  3. <Artur>
    I wonder when will SunOne Application Server (iPlanet AS)
    pass this test. Neither current (6.5) nor previous version
    have been J2EE compliant.
    </Artur>

    Read more carefully, the program is for applications, not application servers.

    later,
    Dan
  4. Artur,

    That is absolutely not true. Not only are they compliant, but iPlanet Application Server 6.0 was the first app server to be J2EE certified. Get a clue.
  5. Notice the requirements listed under the heading "Application Eligibility Testing":

    "Applications must require an application server, be designed to run on multiple application servers, include JavaServer PagesTM technology, Java Servlets, Enterprise Java BeansTM technology, and be packaged as one more more [sic] .ear files."

    I take this to mean that an EJB based application without an integrated GUI component can't be submitted to the verification program. There are plenty of vendors that supply the EJBs and leave the GUI writing to the customer who would love to take part in the verification program. Why leave them out? Plus the fact that it states you have to include JSP and not just servlets seems bogus too. That's my take on this paragraph, although it could have just been the victim of a bad editor.
  6. If I am reading this right, then ISV products that do not include EJBs (J2EE != EJB) would not be accepted as well. This seems rather silly.
  7. I read it that way as well, Ray. Anyone from Sun want to comment?
  8. "I take this to mean that an EJB based application without an integrated GUI component can't be submitted to the verification program." -- Alan

    According to chapter 9 of the J2EE 1.3 spec, a .ear may contain an enterprise application without also containing any client and web modules. So Sun's eligibility requirement does seem overly limiting. And requiring the instantiation of a full J2EE stack is silly. The only reason I can think of is that maybe Sun wants the guaranteed ease of robotic testing against a web tier. I agree with you that Sun's restriction is unclear and needs rewording.
  9. "The only reason I can think of is that maybe Sun wants the guaranteed ease of robotic testing against a web tier." -- Brian

    Yeah, I thought there could be a reason like this, but then why does it spell out that you need both JSP and servlets? A web application as part of an .ear can use one or the other or both.
  10. Our application is not using JSP but XSL, so ...
  11. <
    That could be the case. Just adding the word "or" prior to "Enterprise JavaBeans" changes the entire meaning:

    "Applications must require an application server, be designed to run on multiple application servers, include JavaServer PagesTM technology, Java Servlets, OR Enterprise Java BeansTM technology, and be packaged as one or more .ear files."

    That would seem more reasonable to me - You must take advantage of servlets, JSPs, OR EJBs, but not necessarily all three.
  12. What is J2EE?[ Go to top ]

    must take advantage of servlets, JSPs, OR EJBs, but not necessarily all three


    Except, of course, that if you only use servlets and JSPs you do not REQUIRE an application server. Its the phrase "Applications must require an application server" that is the real gotcha. It depends on the definition of the word require.

    I take it to mean, "must utilize one J2EE artifact in their functionality that is only implemented through application servers and not through some other means". This, IMHO, rules out web applications that just use JSPs and Servlets running against, say, tomcat.

    This now impacts "What is J2EE?". J2EE cannot just be JSPs and Servlets and optionally JDBC, but must also contain one of EJB, JNDI, JMX, JMS, JTA, etc. JavaMail falls out, since it does not require an application server.

    If Sun said instead - must use one or more J2EE component, the situation would be easier, but Application Servers would not be required.
  13. What is J2EE?[ Go to top ]

    <quote>
    Its the phrase "Applications must require an application server" that is the real gotcha. It depends on the definition of the word require.
    </quote>
    I don't think so, since you could call Tomcat an application server. So I think it depends on the definition of the word application server ;-)

    Stefan Tilkov
  14. This is great news from SUN. This will help the development community a lot in testing thier code to see if they are following the J2EE specs.
  15. Does anyone know where to download the AVK? I just found references to some closed pilot on the javasoft site, but wheres the AVK available now?

    Br - Johan
  16. re: downloading the AVK

    I was wondering this too and all I could also find was the "sorry the pilot is full" from http://java.sun.com/j2ee/avk/.

    So the "program" (where you can get the logos, etc) is payable annually, but the actual testing kit is (will be) free? Any idea how comprehensive the AVK is going to be?

    Simon
  17. I've been downloading the software some weeks ago, but because of holidays to Italy and other busy stuff I haven't had the time yet to check it out. If done, I'll report some stuff here...

  18. i think sun needs to have similar program for professional services providers. i mean if j2ee is the architecture on which a service provider is supposed to develop for govt or banks or whatever they need to pass a test suite- after all j2ee is chosen because u should be able to replace databases or appservers-
  19. Anybody want to start a bet on the over/under SUN is going to charge for getting an application "Java" verified?