WebCream 4.4 Swing UI into HTML Website ConversionTool Released

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News: WebCream 4.4 Swing UI into HTML Website ConversionTool Released

  1. WebCream is a Java to HTML conversion tool that acts as a bridge between Java GUI applications and a HTML/JavaScript front end. The new version (4.4) includes a new SnapshotRenderer component that can represent emulate any custom UI component on a webpage, allowing complete UI conversion.

    Check out WebCream 4.4.


    Press Release
    -------------------------
    WebCream 4.4 gives 100% conversion of Swing applications and applets into interactive web sites. Most of the components are mapped to HTML directly, and the components that are not natively supported such as custom components, can be web-enabled using new SnapshotRenderer. This release is a follow on to version 4.3 of CreamTec's pioneering Java to HTML conversion tool that acts as a bridge between Java GUI applications and HTML/JavaScript front end. WebCream renders HTML and JavaScript on the fly for existing GUI applets and applications without the need to even have the source code. You have to see it to believe it!

    What's new in 4.4

    - SnapshotRenderer, a generic custom renderer that produces a GIF and forwards mouse clicks
    - JDK 1.4.1 is now supported. CreamTec stays committed to supporting the latest versions of JDK.
    - Custom error.jsp and exit.jsp allow specifying a custom page that is displayed by WebCream on error or session exit
    - Added "auto-refresh" and "auto-submit" features that refresh/submit the page every X seconds
    - Support for JFileChooser to browse the local disk contents
    ... and other features and improvements


    WebCream goes to Paris

    Caisse Centrale de Reassurance based in Paris, France uses WebCream to web-enable their Swing applications and as a framework to deliver web-applications. One of the 25 largest reinsurance companies in the world, CCR underwrite all types of reinsurance business.
     

    Standard Edition is free and can be downloaded at http://www.creamtec.com/webcream/download.html
  2. WebCream?
  3. Lol. Sorry - the name conjures to mind something else
    ;)
  4. <Q>Lol. Sorry - the name conjures to mind something else </Q>

    Hey Beavis/Butthead, stop giggling and move on. Now if it reminds you of the Herb Alpert album - that is ok.
  5. <Butthead>Hey Beavith... He thaid "Nuttall"</Butthead>

    Sorry, couldn't resist ;^}

    -Greg
  6. <Q>
    <Butthead>Hey Beavith... He thaid "Nuttall"</Butthead>

    Sorry, couldn't resist ;^}

    -Greg
    </Q>
    It took someone long enough. I've heard much worse. :) It definitely shows your powers of observation.

    <Beavis>Yeah, Yeah ... "Nuttall" ... <Weird-Beavis-Squeal></Weird-Beavis-Squeal> </Beavis>
  7. <Q>
    WebCream?
    </Q>

    This tool has been around for a few years. This is just an update. It has been in Java magazines and here and other Java sites.
  8. It could be a way how to create WEB apps in very short time.

    Does it support all javax.swing.* components ?

    Maris
  9. <Q>
    It could be a way how to create WEB apps in very short time.

    Does it support all javax.swing.* components ?
    </Q>

    Check out their site. (Actually their post will tell you).
  10. It supports all javax.swing.* components but to a different extent. Some components have direct one-to-one mapping with HTML elements (JTextField = input text). Some components are mapped to custom JavaScript/HTML solutions (JTree = JavaScript tree). Custom Java components that do not have direct mapping to HTML (Canvas or JComponent descendent with overridden paint() method) are mapped using SnapshotRenderer - a .gif is produced and inserted on the page.

    For a full list of components and more info check out FAQ at http://www.creamtec.com/webcream/doc/faq.html
  11. Here we go again. I'm sure it was challenging, interesting and satisfying to write, but it converts in the wrong direction! If you have an application with a nice Swing GUI, you should deliver it with Java Web Start, and give your customers the pleasure and convenience of a real application. Going from Swing to HTML means wrapping your application's interface in the too-large, confusing, often contradictory and insecure browser interface. And, of course, if you have an existing application, this conversion means rewriting as well as giving up functionality.