IntelliJ IDEA 3.0 Released with enhanced J2EE Support

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News: IntelliJ IDEA 3.0 Released with enhanced J2EE Support

  1. JetBrains has announced the immediate release and availability of IntelliJ IDEA 3.0 java IDE. The new release has tons of new features including new refactorings; built-in support for JSP, XML, and EJB; open API's for third-party plugins; Starbase Starteam integration; local version control; and more.

    Check out IntelliJ IDEA 3

    Press Release
    ------------------------
    JetBrains, Inc. has announced the immediate release and availability of IntelliJ IDEA 3.0, the latest version of its Java development environment that now, having become truly extensible by opening its APIs, can be justly characterized as the most complete productivity package in the Java development market to date.


    IntelliJ IDEA 3.0 comes fully equipped with industry setting refactoring support, super intelligent code editing assistance, a wide range of J2EE development features for rapid web-application and other enterprise development, a powerful Code Inspection tool, and a mountain of other productivity features for Java developers that are second to none.

    The most recent review of IntelliJ IDEA 3.0 conducted by Java Developer's Journal in its September 2002 issue can be found at http://www.sys-con.com/java/article.cfm?id=1611.

    Threaded Messages (75)

  2. We've been using IntelliJ on TheServerSide for some time and are in love with it!
  3. We've been using it too, especially the early accesss beta's of intellij 3.0 and we really love it.


    Jason McKerr
    Northwest Alliance for Computational Science and Engineering
  4. We have been using the accesss beta's of intellij 3.0 We love it. Keep up the good work.
    zelalem
    valtech.co.uk
  5. The EAs have been brilliant and it's such a great tool. If only they had a $99 "personal edition"...

    Simon
  6. Personal Licensing is currently available for $200 until Jan 15th.

    Thoroughly recommended.

    Graham
  7. I'm also in love with it :-)

    Seriously, I've been working with NetBeans/Forte for Java/Sun ONE Studio for nearly 2 years, and I've switched to IDEA 2.5 about a year ago. I've missed Forte's web app support (compiling JSPs, running and debugging) in IDEA 2.5/2.6, although IDEA already had a nice JSP editor. So I've used both and external web containers for a while.

    But now IDEA 3.0 gives me all I need in a single environment, including web app support, with an absolutely marvellous user interface! I've participated in the EAP for the last 2 months, and I've watched it grow better and better! Compared to IDEA's slick UI, NetBeans 3.4 feels so clunky and cumbersome...

    Why pay 3000 USD for JBuilder Enterprise (+ additional 2400 USD twice a year for major updates!! - 5, 6, 7, 8...) when there's IDEA 3.0? OK, JBuilder 8 has UML modelling and a Swing GUI builder, but if you can live without those... And don't forget that since JBuilder 7 web app support is only available in Enterprise (previously the abandoned Professional had basic web app support - the new SE hasn't)!

    Keep up the good work, JetBrains!

    Juergen
  8. Best Java Tool in known Universe[ Go to top ]

    Idea is just the coolest IDE I've ever seen in 15 years,
    including a fully configured & customized Emacs.

    Those guys really show how fast a good team can produce
    good software.

    All the best and keep up the good work!!!

    Cheers,
        Henrik Klagges
        TNGtech
  9. Getting bigger
    (2.5.2 was 8+ MB and 3.0 is 32+)
  10. It is getting bigger, however the size of the install is inflated somewhat since they include a JRE with it.
  11. Simple the greatest of IDE of any kind that I've ever used in my 20 year experience.
  12. Only 16 Mb. The version you're talking about includes it's own J2RE.
  13. I have been using Kawa for a real long time,then switched to JBuilder and finally landed on Idea.I found each and every feature useful and i admit that this is the editor for the real programmer.You have the features,what you really want.It has helped me very much in all my phases of programming,be it coding,debugging or refactoring.I introduced this editor to my colleagues in my office and now most of them switched from Jbuilder to Idea.Great job JetBrains.Keep it up

    Siva
  14. Best Java IDE OUT THERE !![ Go to top ]

    Best Java IDE OUT THERE!!
  15. *Simply the best Java IDE*
    Also a very good and lively community at intellij.org !

    Kudos to the JetBrains
  16. I must be the only person here who doesn't like IDEA. I tested it when I was choosing an IDE and first was presented with a compulsory spam signup, er, I mean "registration". Then after that hurdle when I got it to finally start up it crashed when I fired up the debugger. At that point IDEA disappered from my hard drive quicker than it went on it.

    I now use Eclipse 2.0.1 and I'm really curious as to what IDEA can do that Eclipse cannot. It's an honest question to those who have good knowledge of both IDEs.
  17. I guess you were using really old eap build. Try the final version. I've tried Eclipse a couple of times and I think it's too dumb for me.
  18. I have to add my voice to the chorus of praise for IntelliJ.
    Its a beautiful piece of software.

    I used to be a JBuilder fan.. but havent looked back since IntelliJ 2.5 (I was quite late on the IntelliJ bandwagon).

    Compared to JBuilder, there is no comparison. IntelliJ. Hands down.

    Eclipse v2.0 comes a lot closer to competing with IntelliJ than Eclipse 1.0 - however, for me its still aways behind.

    The difference between IntelliJ and any other IDE (including Eclipse) is primarily the sophistication and the incredible attention to detail. Most IDE's dont even come close in terms of functionality (esp Visual Studio). IntelliJ's support for refactoring, intelligent code generation and error indication outstrips Eclipse.

    The UI adheres tightly to the principle of least surprise - everything is where you might find it, and behaves as you would expect it. The only suprise you get is "Guess what else I have found that IntelliJ does" as you find a new feature.
    And it is also good enough that most features present themselves to you (rather than you having to find them - or requiring a week training course).

    The truly remarkable thing about IntelliJ is how it has accumulated a huge following despite fact that:
    1) It was very late on the IDE scene - competing with well-established players and big corps like Borland and IBM.
    2) They have no salesforce or advertising
    3) They have no marketing people who come to pester you to buy it.
    4) They didnt even have an installer for quite a long time - installation required Winzip + batch file editing
    5) There was next to zero J2EE support
    6) There are zero wizards (sadly, not all people see the uselessness of wizards)


    Who said that good products dont sell themselves.

    -Nick

    PS: The Jetbrains guys would make an absolute killing if they did a C# equivilent. Certainly, VS.net doesnt hold a candle when it comes to day-to-day development.
  19. I get Eclipse for free and I see all the important features in the form of plugins. Can you let me know how IntelliJ IDEA is better over Eclipse?

    Roger
  20. As for free - IntelliJ is not.
    As for a plugin platform - IntelliJ doesnt compete.

    As for coding tool, IntelliJ is simply very, very nice to use because its very helpful.

    While Eclipse matches some of the features of IntelliJ on paper, it lacks the same depth of implementation(refactoring, code navigation and on-the-fly error checking spring to mind as good examples).
    In general, the IntelliJ implementation is usually just more... intelligent. There are just many, many examples where the equivilent Eclipse feature (if it exists) is always one more click away, slightly harder to find, and doesnt do quite what you expect. Its very hard to measure or describe the "intuitiveness" of a UI - but I marvel at how well thought out the IDEA UI is.

    New Intellij Features in 3.0

    If you check out the code inspection (as I did today for the first time) it is quite remarkable.

    While it is not free - it is as good as free for most corporate clients. I would even part with my own USD$400 for a copy.

    My second-choice would be eclipse though.

    -Nick
  21. ...
    As a PS: IntelliJ is the only IDE I have seen that will sway/convert a devout Emacs fanatic. ;-)
    -Nick
  22. Very powerfull interface that can be totally managed by the keyboard.

    Things that I really love
    * powerfull refactorings
    * code inpection
    * Local VCS ( sits between you and the real VCS)

    A must on big projects.

    Jan Casteels
  23. I am sorry, I did find all the features in Eclipse which you mentioned for IntelliJ IDEA. I still need some "really" valid reason for spending $ 400 from my pocket. Does it have good JSP debugging capabilities? How does it integrate with Clearcase? How good is the debugger? Can it catch exceptions (powerful feature of eclipse debugger). Your inputs are very valuable.

    Roger.
  24. Roger,

    First, let me answer some of your questions the best I can:

    - IDEA 3.0 has JSP debugging capabilities. I have not tried it, but in general if IDEA has a feature you can assume that it is implemented well
    - IDEA integrates with Clearcase through a plugin.
    - The debugger is in my opinion quite good.
    - What do you mean does "it" catch exceptions? Java code catches exceptions... If you are asking whether the IDE helps you determine when you (the coder) need to catch exceptions in your code, then yes it does that very well.

    Second, to reinforce what others have already said, it is not about features that IntelliJ IDEA has that other IDEs do not. It is first and foremost about how well its features are implemented, and how good the IDE experience is in general. The ONLY way you can tell whether or not an IDE will work for you is to try it out. If having a laundry list of features determined the best IDE, then JBuilder would be the best IDE. However, we all know JBuilder is not the best IDE. Hence, having a laundry list of features DOES NOT determine the best IDE. (Ah, Modus Tollens... I knew my philosophy degree would come in handy some day).
  25. <quote>
    However, we all know JBuilder is not the best IDE. Hence, having a laundry list of features DOES NOT determine the best IDE. (Ah, Modus Tollens... I knew my philosophy degree would come in handy some day).
    </quote>

    You are a little bit too enthusiastic in your statements.
    In YOUR opinion, JBuilder may not be the best IDE, but IMHO it is still the best. You perfectly serves the cliché of an old, command-line experienced hacker from former days with the motto: Editor is all I want! Excuse me, but this is the typical picture, used in flamed debates about the Wizard-adherend Visual Basic-Programmers and the Hardcore-hackers with nothing than an editor.
    My opininion, as mentioned above, is, that JBuilder (Enterprise) is the best tool in market for Web/EJB- development . The roundtrip time is extremely short and the supported App-Servers are enourmous. The built-in EJB2.0-Designer really rocks!
    But there are also drawbacks. The main is the price. So, if your company cannot buy you and your team a license, my second choice would be IDEA with xDoclets, although you are not as productive as with JBuilder, which is a result of its features.
    Just my 2 cents
    M.S.
  26. <quote>
    My opininion, as mentioned above, is, that JBuilder (Enterprise) is the best tool in market for Web/EJB- development . The roundtrip time is extremely short and the supported App-Servers are enourmous. The built-in EJB2.0-Designer really rocks!
    </quote>

    Cannot disagree more. JBuilder 7 is my main development environment for the moment, which is forced by my project management. We heavily use this Enterprise things and the only comment I have about them is that they sucks.

    There are many errors, like putting the opening { bracket in the wrong place when regenerating interfaces. The EJB designer is completely sluggish on my 512MB Athlon 1GHz machine, with ca. 30 beans only. Simple opening of it takes about 10 seconds!!! We have many other problems with it, it even once completely destroyed the code of our bean!. We had to recover it from CVS.
    Jbuilder has refactorings, but they are very primitive comparing to IDEA's. Good example is an "Extract method" - the only thing it does in JB is extracting the selected part of code to a method and replacing it with a call. IDEA does it much better - it scans the whole class source, finds other places in which extracted code (or similar) occurs, and replaces them ALL with a method call. And "extract method" in JB works only for a single-parameter methods extracted - what a joke. And of course almost each refactoring needs to rebuild the whole project, which is very bad when you have 1000+ classes.

    <quote>
    But there are also drawbacks. The main is the price. So, if your company cannot buy you and your team a license, my second choice would be IDEA with xDoclets, although you are not as productive as with JBuilder, which is a result of its features.
    </quote>

    In our project we HAVE to use both Jbuilder and XDoclet, because this wonderful IDE is not able to generate data objects for beans. It is a waste of money, at least in the 7 version.

    Regards,
    Michal
  27. <quote>JBuilder may not be the best IDE, but IMHO it is still the best.</quote>

    I know this discussion is about IntelliJ IDEA but when I see unqualified statements like this I have to react. JBuilder is an extremely rich IDE, its like no other IDE if you are comparing the wealth of features. However, if you've ever attempted to use this thing, you will realized how flawed it is. I've tried both JB6 and JB7. The list of bugs I've found alone makes this IDE (particularly with the EJB Designer and the countless times it crashes during debugging) probably the worst I've ever had experience with. The support personnel is as incompetent as the IDE itself - but to be fair I will commend those that are active in their newsgroups. I am also sick of the fact that bug fixes require that you to purchase an upgrade for the next release. In case you think I'm some disgruntled ex-employee of Borland, try reading all the complaints posted on their newsgroups. That alone should prove how bad it really is. They still have a ways to go before you can call JBuilder the best. JB8 is coming out soon - but after all I've been through with it, I'm not expecting much.

    As far as IntelliJ is concerned, I've briefly tried an evaluation of 2.6. It was a bit slow but the refactoring and code completion features are nice. I definitely look forward to trying out version 3.0 now that it has EJB support.
  28. <quote>JBuilder may not be the best IDE, but IMHO it is still the best.</quote>

    I know this discussion is about IntelliJ IDEA but when I see unqualified statements like this I have to react. JBuilder is an extremely rich IDE, its like no other IDE if you are comparing the wealth of features. However, if you've ever attempted to use this thing, you will realized how flawed it is. I've tried both JB6 and JB7. The list of bugs I've found alone makes this IDE (particularly with the EJB Designer and the countless times it crashes during debugging) probably the worst I've ever had experience with. The support personnel is as incompetent as the IDE itself - but to be fair I will commend those that are active in their newsgroups. I am also sick of the fact that bug fixes require that you to purchase an upgrade for the next release. In case you think I'm some disgruntled ex-employee of Borland, try reading all the complaints posted on their newsgroups. That alone should prove how bad it really is. They still have a ways to go before you can call JBuilder the best. JB8 is coming out soon - but after all I've been through with it, I'm not expecting much.

    As far as IntelliJ is concerned, I've briefly tried an evaluation of 2.6. It was a bit slow but the refactoring and code completion features are nice. I definitely look forward to trying out version 3.0 now that it has EJB support.
  29. IntelliJ is simply excellent, but what they really need is a hobbyist or non-professional version of the IDE. Its very hard for me to spend $400 of my own cash on something that's really just for me. I love it more than any other IDE that I have used including Together, WSAD, Eclipse, Forte (not hard to be better than that bloatfest), JBuilder, Jedit, and Jext.

    It is simply intuitive to use and works so well that I can get so much more done that other people. I'd been using it at work since the early EAPs, but the company decided to go with JBuilder (sigh) - but now I want to use it exclusively for my own stuff... if it were $200 bucks I wouldn't hesitate to pick up a copy for my own personal use. I hope they're listening :-D
  30. <quote>
    (particularly with the EJB Designer and the countless times it crashes during debugging)
    </quote>

    I don't want to give any deep answer to this, but it seems you doesn't get the point of the EJB-Designer. As the name states, it is a design tool for your EJBs. If you are debugging some code, there is absolutely no need for the designer being open (for which purpose??).

    The thing, why I think, JBuilder is the superior IDE, is that it integrates the whole needed environment for designing, developing, deploying, debugging, building, configuring and (in the version 8) profiling, while supporting all major AppServers, also their different versions, absolutely best. Additionally it makes many processes and states even visionally available, which serves good for complicated issues as EJB development.

    As I stated above, if the price is a show stopper for the company I work for, then IDEA is the choice.

    As a private developer, I wouldn't even spend 1$ for an IDE, because the time you can save with it, counts nothing in an economical sense. So, I go with Eclipse privately.

    I'm not very enthusiatic about IDEs, but I can value them.

    Just my 2 Cents
    Michael
  31. I have to disagree with the statement "As a private developer, I wouldn't even spend 1$ for an IDE, because the time you can save with it, counts nothing in an economical sense". My time is valuable - extremely valuable - and time is a resource that I cannot get more of, unlike money. Since I have less time when I'm developing stuff as a hobby I have to make the best use of my time, so I must absolutely use the tool that helps me best do the job - that tool remains IntelliJ at the moment. Its just that its a tad expensive for an individual, but an absolute bargain for a company.
  32. <quote>
    I don't want to give any deep answer to this, but it seems you doesn't get the point of the EJB-Designer. As the name states, it is a design tool for your EJBs. If you are debugging some code, there is absolutely no need for the designer being open (for which purpose??).
    </quote>

    I'm refering to JBuilder crashing during debugging, not EJB Designer. EJB Designer has problems of its own - i.e. incorrectly synching changes to EJBs and deployment descriptors after making a change in designer.
  33. IDEA 3.0 is a revelation. I have used IDEA 2.6 and the 3.0 betas until build 638 and I have to say I was still not prepared for how polished 3.0 Final is.

    I've also used Eclipse 2.0 in the past. It is definitely prettier (though 3.0 has closed the gap by quite a lot) and the GUI is perhaps a little more responsive due to SWT. And sure, on paper it maybe does everything IntelliJ does. But I've found that for day to day coding tasks, IntelliJ is just so much more natural. I have to agree with another poster who said with Eclipse everything is just one more click away, or not quite exactly where you'd expect to find it, whereas IntelliJ just Feels Right.

    I certainly wanted to like Eclipse more... it's free and so pretty. But ultimately when it comes to getting work done I turn to IntelliJ.

    If it doesn't sound like much of an argument to you, just download the eval and try it for your next project. If you still like Eclipse better, I envy you, for being able to save hundreds of $$$... :)
  34. When I was looking to switch from JBuilder 6, as a result of its very sluggish performance and huge memory footprint, I looked at Eclipse and IDEA. After trying Eclipse for a few weeks (and trust me, I tried hard), I gave it up because it just wasnt as productive as the tools I was used to such as VJ++ or even JBuilder. The biggest drawback that I found was the lack of keybinding support. This was the deal killer for me since I am a very keyboard oriented person and hate using the mouse unless I absolutely have to. I believe that this feature in Eclipse has still not been implemented even though it has been on the drawing board for quite a while.

    After trying IDEA 2.5 and loving the way it enhances my productivity (I have custom shortcuts for practically everything esp refactorings), I never switched to anything else even though IDEA does not completely fill my needs. There was a serious lack of EJB, JUnit code generation and proper JSP support; all of these, however, have been mitigated with this release. One feature I would like to see in IDEA that I really liked in JBuilder is UML support, if only to the extent of autogenerating Class Diagrams.

    To summarize, I found Eclipse to be a good and performant tool; however, it was a tool that did not allow me to develop as quickly and as effortlessly as IDEA did and I think this is the decisive factor for most people who like IDEA: usability.

    ps. anyone figure out how they have done such a great job with their Swing app? I am continually amazed by the responsiveness and comparatively small footprint of IDEA esp. after using Swing apps like JBuilder. It makes me wonder about the need for SWT.
  35. Yes, its true, Eclipse has many features and its free.
    But, for 400$ u you may have IDEA twice - at home and at work.
    Eclipse ist quick and IDEA is slow (native vs java).
    But you can work with IDEA very quick.
    My coworkers have also Eclipse and I work with IDEA.
    But for really complex refactorings they ask me because with Eclipse you can't du such things.

    Pls, don't forget that Eclipse comes from IBM.
    IBM has enough money for such games.
    Its not really free, its like TV.
    You don't pay for it, but you must see reclama.
    So you pay it later. With your time. With your money.
  36. I am sorry, I did find all the features in Eclipse which you mentioned for IntelliJ IDEA. I still need some "really" valid reason for spending $ 400 from my pocket. Does it have good JSP debugging capabilities? How does it integrate with Clearcase? How good is the debugger? Can it catch exceptions (powerful feature of eclipse debugger). Your inputs are very valuable.

    Roger.
  37. I have to agree with almost everyone above. I love IntelliJ and after six months of use, still have no regrets about leaving JBuilder and Eclipse behind. It's hard to list everything in one post, but basically, it just -thinks- like a Java developer. Instead of getting in the way and trying to change the way I code, it seems to understand exactly what I'm doing and accelerates my work.

    At this point, it's won over our entire team, supplanting JBuilder, Eclipse, NetBeans, emacs, TextPad, SlickEdit and UltraEdit on desktops around here. (No small feat for this band of free spirits.)
  38. I see, This IDE is very fast and very good a memory usage, Are you sure it is Pure JAVA Swing?
    A project with more then double the number of files takes less then Half the memory, when compared to VS.NET.
  39. Yes. I started looking at the trial version and started liking it. You guys are right. IDEA has good refactoring capabilities over Eclipse. Ant support features are cool too. I am still fighting to integrate Weblogic 7.0 with it. IDEA doesn't find the class if it is in external jar, though I have it in my classpath. It expects the class to be located in the project. Is this the way it works or am I wrong? Have any of you integrated with Weblogic just by pointing it to weblogic.jar?

    Thanks

    Roger
  40. Just put it in libraries. You can for example create "External Libraries" and put your WebLogic.jar inside that. You find libraries under project properties. Then just point your main class in Run/Debug -> Application (under project properties).
  41. Have any of you IntelliJ fans tried "CodeGuide" from OmniCore?

    http://www.omnicore.com/

    CodeGuide seems similar to IntelliJ. They both focus on smart assistance with editing, compiling, debugging, without the GUI drag-and-drop builders, wizards, etc. They have a similar cost (US $300 vs $400-600). They both are built by a hard-working small company.

    I have only dabbled with both CodeGuide and IntelliJ, so I am asking if anyone with more experience might give a comparison.

    One difference: The latest version of CodeGuide runs on all JDKs (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4) while IntelliJ requires 1.4 (not yet available on Mac OS X and other platforms).

    --Basil Bourque
  42. I've been using IDEA for about 6 months now and love it, even the 2.6 release. When I moved to the 3 beta I liked it even more.

    My work however is mostly "non-visual" with just the occasional servlet or JSP. I'm curious to know if anyone is actually using it for Swing development?

    Nick
  43. Have any of you IntelliJ fans tried "CodeGuide" from OmniCore?

    >
    > http://www.omnicore.com/
    >
    > CodeGuide seems similar to IntelliJ. They both focus on smart assistance with editing, compiling, debugging, without the GUI drag-and-drop builders, wizards, etc. They have a similar cost (US $300 vs $400-600). They both are built by a hard-working small company.
    >
    > I have only dabbled with both CodeGuide and IntelliJ, so I am asking if anyone with more experience might give a comparison.
    >
    > One difference: The latest version of CodeGuide runs on all JDKs (1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4) while IntelliJ requires 1.4 (not yet available on Mac OS X and other platforms).
    >
    > --Basil Bourque

    It is funny if you take a look at the feature list for IDEA 3.0 and the feature list for CodeGuide 6.0 (which came after idea 3) :):) Both products run each after the other :) CG has error highlighting from veeery long time, IDEA has good error h.l. since ver. 3.0 (still many bugs to fix, although 3.0.2 is much better). Many refactorings, which are in IDEA 3 appeared after it in CG 6. IMHO refactoring in IDEA is much, much better and 'clever' than those in CG The TODO browser first appeared in IDEA, mich later in CG. The navigation in CG 6 (i mean jumps to class definition, methods etc) is improved compared to earlier CG versions, but IDEA's navigation is much easier an intuitive (in CG6 you still can't know just with a single look if the current method overrides method in base class, or implements a method from an interface etc..). Code inspection can be find first in idea 3, later in CG 6 :)

    I don't like the Debugger in CodeGuide. It is buggy and has only the minor set of possible features one debugger can have. In IDEA you can make the debugger break into debug mode when exception is thrown (you can set which exceptions). You can make IDEA watch when variable value is to be changed and to break into debug mode or just print a log message... and much more. All this nice debugging capabilities are missing in CG 6.

    CVS integrstion:
     In IDEA it is a separate toolbar, with tree-like view for the files, with possibility to filter "changed", "unknown" files and so on... well, i just can say, that many times i prefer working with integrated CVS in idea, rather then starting WinCVS or gCVS.....
      In CG 6: CVS integration is just calling the cvs executable after selecting a command from the Tools menu (or pop-up menu).

    Another thing: You can open more than one project with IDEA and each project can occupy different IDEA frame BUT all frames are opened in the same virtual machine! If you want to open two project with CG, you must run another copy of CG and thus run another JVM with all the resources it needs! And this is very bad when you develop client-server app and both the client and the server are java.

    No need to mention the plug-in support in IDEA, which CG does not have (yet).

    Key Bindings - in Idea you can have set of keymaps, also you can have several key shortcuts assigned to some action. Very useful for me, because i use ctrl-c/x/v shortcuts, and some of my colleagues use ctrl/shift+ins/del. So it is easy for everyone to go and to type code on other PCs. In CG 6: only one keymap, only one shortcut per action.

    The Structure view: no need to mention how powerful it is in IDEA! In CG you can't do anything useful from its Structure View, neither it gives you some useful information.

    hmmm the post became too long :) So just run CodeGuide 6 with some project, take a look at it, then do the same with IDEA 3. Got the IDEA? :):):):):)
  44. I have it integrated with weblogic 7. One nice feature that actually works is Remote Debugging with weblogic 7. That in itself was the clincher for me.
  45. Arrrgh, how did .net creep into this discussion?!?! Geez...

    I've been using IDEA for a year, and I love it. I bought the program myself, and that included a license for the next major upgrade. The JetBrain developers are quite open to suggestions and very responsive. It truly is an amazing product, and demonstrates that java on the client can be awesome if done right.
  46. IDEA is by far the BEST Java IDE around IMO. I have tried JBuilder, NetBeans, WSAD 4.0.3 (This is the product we are forced to use) and even Eclipse 2.0.1

    But its only IDEA tht really makes my "Develop with Pleasure". It makes it so much fun. The 2 debugger features that I found a surprise and useful are "view as toString()" and the "alternate collections view". Looking into a Map has never been easier.

    Thanks JetBrain.
  47. I also wanted to add the IDEA does not force you (like WSAD 4.0.3) to create Web projects in a particular way. For example a single project I can setup multiple webapps using diffrent Tomcat configs and not have to worry about WEB-INF/classes or WEB-INF/lib (dont need to copy may dependant jars into multiple WEB-INF/lib like WSAD forces us to do).

    And we even have successfully setup WAS 4.0.4 and do remote debugging against it from IDEA. I can compile into WAS and debug it from IDEA. Really nice.

    Thanks JetBrain
  48. Only spending a little time with the tool I like what I see to develop code. What I dislike is the less than available documentation and environment integration. I'm hitting my head against the wall to get Resin integrated and previous comments about Weblogic make me think Intellij needs to at least offer more than intellij.org for people to figure this stuff out. Jbuilder was pretty easy but I paid $$ for it but I was productive in 5 minutes. I'll eventually figure it out or someone else will and post it.
  49. I'm hitting my head against the wall to get Resin integrated


    What do you mean by "integrated"? What are you trying to achieve?

    Essentially, what I do (with WLS, etc and other server-side code) is add the required jars to the classpath for development.
    For deployment I use ant.
    For debugging, I use the jpda connection.

    Its been fairly straightforward.

    (I am sure you have found this - but there is http://www.intellij.net as well - there are forums there)

    -Nick
  50. I meant integrated with servlet/j2ee servers to deploy/test with minimal configuration. I did manage to get all the right .jars into the classpath and it works fine. Didn't know about the intellij.net site but I guess I would have stumbled upon it evenutally like the .org site. My point is that if your happy with Tomcat it's easy, if not then it would have been nicely noted in an FAQ instead of relying upon a forum.b

    Thanks for the info.
  51. It works ! (I can believe you are doing professional coding with Eclipse ?)
  52. I totally agree. The most refreshing thing about IDEA is that (so far) they've concentrated on making the editing experience as powerful as possible, which includes great refactoring tools.

    Wizards just help you get in over your head quickly. If you /need/ a wizard, then something is wrong with the API.
  53. Opinion of an Eclipse Addict[ Go to top ]

    I ran down the list of new features of IDEA. Note, I have not used IDEA previously. I looked at back when it was first released and was impressed, however I was using VisualAge and it too was impressive in a different way.

    Here's my take on the features with a conclusion:

    http://www.freeroller.net/page/ceperez/20021113#idea_3_0_an_endless

    Note, I haven't played with the product, however I got to say the feature list is impressive.
  54. Try again you will not regret it. It does not crash by itself, it may have crashed during JPDA session, but this seems to be JPDA feature, happens with other IDEs as well (JDeveloper, Netbeans).

    IDEA is ultimate software in terms of ergonomics and usability. Very realiable too. It is just pleasure to use. I can confidently say it is the best development software I have ever used. Sometimes I even think it was designed by expat Japanese in Prag ;-).

    Yeah, and all this vi lovers should try IDEA too :-), its about time.

    Try again,
    Michael
  55. Oups,
    It is correction to my ethusiastic review above.

    While I was very _much_ in favour of IDEA 2+, I've just
    tried the new version 3 and it does not seem to be a step in to right direction.

    Graphics starting from the installer through new icons look quite cheesy. My menu fonts also look weird. Tons of config items of dubious value.

    I've really liked version 2 for it simplicity, ergonomy and polished quality, the new version appears really bloated and definitelly lacks this polished touch.

    I am afraid it moves towards other IDEs: more wizards, more items on the feature list, easier to sell to managers, more difficult to use for developers. So far there is 13 (sic!) items in the main menu! It is scary, but version 4 may look like the late MIR station - all the grand features and duct tape all over it ;-(.

    Really hope that they will release the IDEA light.

    Again, where did they get these graphics. I know it is highly subjective but to me they suck big time.

    Above is my subjective opinion, take for what it is worth, but keep your version 2 binaries in the safe place. I have no financial stake in version 2, moreover these days I use the MS Visual Studio ;-).

    Michael
  56. Cheesy icons????

    I very much like them. They remind me of the the look of OS/X and RedHat 8's Blue Curve.

    They do have a softer kind of happy look, but the IDE simply kicks maximum booty. I don't beleive I will use the mighty JBuilder again.

    Code completion in xml, key bindings, help with hacking ejbs, etc, plugins for all of the major source control tools (who needs more than CVS anyway =) ). I'm getting spoiled.

    And now I have another excuse to visit Prague.

    Best Regards,

    Cory Adams
  57. How can you seriously edit XML, or JSP files in Eclipse ? Having to ask for validation is a pain. (In IDEA, you get dynamic error highlighting, as in the Java editor.) And once you have validated and got error messages, you can't event refer to line numbers. (Unless you know some some Eclipse XML editor that does the Job ?)

    However, Eclipse has indeed some advantages, but small ones : you can automatically layout HTML and JSP (In IDEA, you have to switch to XHTML and the XML syntax of JSP to get automatic layout. I can't understand why they did not put it in version 3). Another advantage of Eclipse is the possibility to open JAR files and synchronise class files with sources.

    Last, you have the very promising Omondo plugin.

    I think Eclipse is not mature enough. Maybe within 18 month it will be better than IDEA. But for now, IDEA is the best IDE I have ever seen.
  58. It is incomparable. The lots of features attracted me to use it. It's really supereb. It will be more nice if some more features could be added e.g. template for method, JSP etc.
  59. This is an absolutely superb IDE. No other is even close...

    After learning all the shortcuts, you'll be coding way faster than before and productivity just goes up and up.

    One of my colleagues joked that IntelliJ will soon be able to code the whole project with a single click/keystroke! =)

    Well done!
    Keith
  60. IDEA, I love you[ Go to top ]

    I highly recommend IDEA. I've used a lot of IDE's over the years and IDEA is the only one that I've been really enthusiastic about.

    Brien Voorhees
  61. I agree with all the praises but..

    I hope it will remain just wrapper around jsdk without supplying and tying to one.

    I hope it will not add wizards, visual editor, etc.

    I hope it will remain small, not weighing 100 - 200 MBs
  62. One of the features that I need in a modern J2EE IDE is HotSwap.

    If you have not heard of HotSwap, look at Sun JDK 1.4

    HotSwap is a part of Sun's JPDA
     http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4/docs/guide/jpda/enhancements.html


    "HotSwap" is also known as "hot code replacement" or "method replacement"

    Today, I downloaded IDEA 3.0 and started using the debugger.

    The IDEA debugger does not appear to be aware of the HotSwap capability in Sun's JVM.

    (FYI, Eclipse 2.0.1 is HotSwap-aware. If you are using JDK 1.4.x, Eclipse will use HotSwap)

    I have been evaluating IBM's WSAD version 5.0

    Sadly, WSAD 5.0 is configured for JDK 1.3 development. Out of the box, it does not handle HotSwap debugging.

    IBM VisualAge Enterprise Edition version 3.5 has some really nifty debugging tools for servlet and EJB development. You can easily edit the servlets and the EJB's while debugging. It is slick.

    I hope that new J2EE IDE vendors will start providing HotSwap-like debugging capabilities. It will make servlet and EJB development much easier.
  63. I also like "HotSwap" very much. Sometimes I have to spend a lot of time to reach the point I want to test. If the IDE supports HotSwap, I can modify the code then test it again immediately when I found a problem.

    Luoh Ren-Shan
  64. Agreed.

    IntelliJ takes the IDE to a whole new level. The other IDE vendors are way behind and are struggling to catch up with their bloated offerings.

    Cheers,

    Clinton
  65. Boy, this thing rocks![ Go to top ]

    One more note about IDEA... It is a very complex Swing application - and it performs like a native app on my machine (800MHz, 512MB). The only other Swing app of this complexity I have used is NetBeans, and it wass *much* more sluggish than IDEA. Perhaps all those bashing Swing for its performance should examine IDEA - a good example for how to write a performant Swing application. Maybe the Java GUI APIs won't have to fragment after all (Swing vs. SWT).

    Just some thoughts...

    Ryan
  66. The price is a concern if for whatever reason you can't get your company to spring for it. However, IDEA has a good eval period, with nothing disabled. More importantly, JB periodically puts it on sale for half price, usually around a holiday. (I picked up mine between Christmas and New Year last year.) The sale price is only available for single license purchases, under an individual's name (not a company name).

    Jim
  67. Our team, which have individuals with very strong opinions about IDEs, decided to switch to IDEA a few months ago. We found it to boost our coding productivity by at least 20-30% and made refactoring tasks a breeze. Combined with ant and xdoclet, most j2ee programming tasks became straigtforward.

    How the hell is it possible to write a Swing application running at this speed??? For huge projects with thousands of classes, we found that it was faster than many native apps. Incredible.

    When we were forced to switch to Eclipse for politcal reasons, everyone got REALLY angry.

    Even the emacs guy...
  68. Develop with Pleasure![ Go to top ]

    I was very skeptic when i saw the marketing slogan "Develop with Pleasure!" when a friend introduced me to IntelliJ as it sounded like a "yet another ubiquitous IDE claim". I have never been more pleasantly surprised!!!

    I have been using the product for the last one year and have never stopped marvelling at the elegance of the product.

    Things i love about this product:
    =================================
    * Being able to do almost everything with keyboard
    * Richest set of navigation options which flows with thought flow instead of file structure or package structure
    * Cool and reliable refactoring which saves tons of time spent on mundane task
    * Very short learning time (helps in winning converts!)
    * Not overwhelming with options.
    * Very intelligent auto complete features (especially naming)
    * Abilitly to make me smile when i go "i wish they have that ..." and discover intuitively (thanks to consistent key maps) that it it already available.

    If not anything, the time and the stress that it reduces is worth the shot for those who are still deliberating.
  69. Superb Editor. The error highlighting, code completion, automatic import handling, templates, Web/JSP development, EJB etc. make this the best java editor. It seems like JetBrains has set the goals for other IDE vendors (They constantly play catch up).

    I also a few suggestions:

    - Integrated SQL viewer(generate SQL from viewer to code and visa versa)
    - Integration with Weblogic (Just like JRUN)
    - Bundle GLUE
    - JDO (Just like EJB- probably provide support for Apache OJB)
    - Integrated search feature to search the Java DOCs

    Keep up the good work and keep away from the take over hawks (e.g. TogetherSoft was bought out by Borland)
  70. I think GLUE is bundled:

    <idea-root>/lib/GLUE-STD.jar
  71. Idea rocks and here's why:

    http://home.iprimus.com.au/trinexus/idea.html
  72. &#45000;&#44057;&#51008; &#53812;&#51060; &#46300;&#45964; &#51221;&#49885;&#51060; &#46104;&#45796;&#45768;...
    &#55121;&#55121;&#55121;... &#44048;&#44201;&#51032; &#45576;&#47932;....

    develop with pleasure
  73. Hi,

    I love Intellij too, but for big projects (> 3000 Java Classes, > 200.000 lines of
    code) Intellij is not the right one. Here Idea is inperformant and extremely instable. So it can occur that only a change at one java class followed by a Make call takes approx. 10 minutes. I don't know why.

    Greetings from Berlin,
    Gabriel
  74. No problems here[ Go to top ]

    I use intellij on a large project wihout any problems (>2500 classes 150K LOC + 500 JSPs). I use Jikes for fast compile times, you may want to try the same. Memory settings i use are(-Xms 250M -Xmx 640M).

    Alok
  75. there are some problems with multi output paths in idea3.0.2
    1.can't configure ejb support automatically.
    2.can't compile the source files into the referenced path.
  76. JSP debugger is available only thro' Tomcat plugin, otherwise there is no JSP debugger support.

    But still I love this IDEA, as all said it is somewhat easy compare to all other IDEs.