Visual Basic Users Migrating To Java And C#

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News: Visual Basic Users Migrating To Java And C#

  1. Market researcher Evans Data said Tuesday that 52 percent of software developers surveyed use Visual Basic today, but that 43 percent of them plan to move to other languages. Thirty-nine percent of those developers who reported that they are decreasing their use of VB said they intend to program with C#, while 31 percent said they plan to move to Java, according to the study.

    The Evans Data Press Release
    ------------------------------
    SANTA CRUZ, CA, May 6, 2003 - A new survey from development research firm, Evans Data Corporation, has found that 52% of all software developers use Visual Basic today but that 43% of them are planning to reduce their usage of the language next year. However, a third of VB users are planning to migrate directly to VB.Net.

    The North American Development Survey Volume 1, 2003, completed in April, found that 39% of the 43% of developers decreasing their VB usage intend to increase their use of C#. Java use is also increasing amongst developers reducing their Visual Basic usage with 31% indicating that they plan to increase their usage of the platform-agnostic programming language.

    "Microsoft has a serious stake in migrating the Visual Basic community to a .Net language and it appears that they are making headway," said Esther Schindler, senior analyst at Evans Data. "However, as they leave Visual Basic 6.0 behind, developers are choosing languages that help them work more easily with emerging technologies such as wireless and Web services development."

    Other findings from the April survey of more than 600 of developers include:

     - Half of developers in the survey have bought into the use of peer-to-peer technology in the enterprise; 51% indicated that they "absolutely" or "probably" will use peer-to-peer technology in their network applications.
     - When asked about the primary process methodology employed in the development process, the vast majority of developers responded with an in-house/proprietary methodology at 39%. Rapid Application Design (RAD) is a distant second at 16% and eXtreme Programming is even further back at 9%.
     - More than a third of companies, 38%, prohibit the use of Instant Messaging. The most used means to combat its use are: firewalls, 23% and company policy, 15%.
    About Evans Data Corporation

    Evans Data Corporation provides regularly updated IT industry market intelligence based on in-depth surveys of the global developer population. Evans' syndicated research includes surveys focused on developers in North America, Asia/Pacific (APAC) and Europe, the Middle East and African (EMEA) markets, also in specific technology areas like: Linux, Databases, Embedded Systems and Enterprise Development Management Issues. Evans Data customers include IBM, Intel, Sun Microsystems, HP and Nokia.

    Evans Data can be reached by phone: 831 457-9013, by email: eriko at evansdata dot com or on the web: http://www.evansdata.com/. In Europe, contact Jeremy McGee, +44 (0) 23 8079-0655 jeremy dot mcgee at bassettmarketing dot com; in Japan: Philip Davies, +03 3486 2676 davies at ods dot co dot jp.
  2. "...while 31 percent said they plan to move to Java, according to the study.
    "

    Good. The Java development community needs an influx of good developers to "raise the average".
  3. "...while 31 percent said they plan to move to Java, according to the study.

    > "
    >
    > Good. The Java development community needs an influx of good developers to "raise the average".

    And an influx of VB developers is going to "raise the average"...??!
  4. Sorry, I couldn't resist.
  5. I thought it was a brilliant comment ... good sense of humor ;-)

    Honestly, though, if the Java market cannot attract VB developers, it's a bad sign. Particularly, it would indicate that the tools suck and the technology is hard to use (i.e. what it was definitely like 5 years ago.)

    Seeing that 31% are moving to Java is incredibly encouraging ... higher than I would have expected. (The path of least resistence is obviously to VB.NET ... for many VB apps, it would make a lot of sense to go in that direction.)

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Easily share live data across a cluster!
  6. 31%... really??[ Go to top ]

    Seeing that 31% are moving to Java is incredibly encouraging ...


    Well, 31% *say* they are *planning* to use Java... I've been saying I plan to learn Perl for 3 years now. ;)
  7. |
    |The path of least resistence is obviously to VB.NET ... for many VB apps, it
    |would make a lot of sense to go in that direction.
    |

    The feedback I have gotten from most VB developers is that its rather difficult to move to VB.net because its simultanously familiar and completely alien (e.g. http://www.mvps.org/vb/index2.html?rants/vfred.htm).
    Many developers find it easier to make a "clean break" and start with a completely new language.

    VB.net is a fully object-oriented language, with polymorphism and overloading etc. You would think that this is a good thing - but effectively what they have done is made the entry level (in terms of programmer ability) to the CLR much higher.

    With the old COM stack, there was a lot of value in being able to "stitch together" components written in C++ with lightweight, procedural scripts. Typically the C++ component developer and the VB component developer were two different animals - and COM allowed them to work together.

    With VB.net, the CLR has lost some of this appeal (obviously. otherwise, why would VB developers be moving away from it). Essentially, the .net stack really just comprises of languages that look like C# (there is some debate that takes this even further http://www.javalobby.com/clr.html).

    In any case, with a lack of a non-OO language that is a 1st class citizen of the CLR, the multi-language advantage is somewhat diminished (compared to COM anyway).

    -Nick
  8. VisualStudio.NET for Java?[ Go to top ]

    Has anyone seen the new Workshop from BEA?

    http://www.bea.com/framework.jsp?CNT=demos.htm&FP=/content/new_releases/products/workshop/evaluate/

    It is downloadable too.

    Can you say VisualStudio.NET for Java??? This should help the migration of developers. Thank God someone is addressing MS moving into this space.

    Harvey
  9. what percent using java today[ Go to top ]

    The title mentioned 31% plan to use Java, but what percent are using it now?

    Cheers,
    Don Morgan
    DeveloperAdvantage
    www.developeradvantage.com
  10. what percent using java today[ Go to top ]

    http://www.tiobe.com/tiobe_index/index.htm
  11. what percent using java today[ Go to top ]

    Thanks Cameron - looks like a good link.

    We were looking for this type of information towards the end of last year, a couple of other decent, but dated, articles were:

    http://news.zdnet.co.uk/cgi-bin/uk/printerfriendly.cgi?id=2127185&tid=300
    (sorry, I only have the printerfriendly one bookmarked, but it works well anyway)

    and

    http://www.itaa.org/news/pr/PressRelease.cfm?ReleaseID=1040248187

    Perhaps someone at Evans could do us a favor and cough up the number for java developers like they did for VB - "52 percent of software developers surveyed use Visual Basic today."

    Don