J2EE unproductive

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General J2EE: J2EE unproductive

  1. J2EE unproductive (7 messages)

    We use a ERP framework of a small company. This framework is not finished and is on top of EJB.

    Working with our framework and EJB is a pain to me. Deploying is painful too.

    It is a chaos our project. The framework is not finished and we are under pressure to produce something by using this framework. The ship sinks but noone wants to see that.

    We have no experienced programer. The somewhat experienced programers are the ones who write the 3rd party framework.

    It seems very strange to me, that our company is the only customer of this framework. Further I cannot understand why our company lets us develop with a unfinished and buggy framework instead of having choosen a different solution.

    I would also have prefered to start developing from bottom up. If we discovered that we need EJB then we could have refactored our code to meet this new technique. I read a lot of times that people don't recommend to start with EJB and that they think, that it is unlikely that one will need it while the project goes on.

    We are very unproductive with EJB and our framework. I don't want to work overtime because of bad decisions of people above me.

    This whole thing requires very much know how which we don't have. If somone leaves the team then our company will have to invest more than a man year to have a somewhat productive worker. But he will not be really productive no matter how much experience he has with our framework.

    What do you think about my experiences and point of view?

    Threaded Messages (7)

  2. J2EE unproductive[ Go to top ]

    You cannot blame J2EE or EJBs in this scenario. EJBs cannot be used to solve all problems in the IT industry. They are meant to solve only certain problems. Long time ago, I had read a whitepaper by Ed Roman on TSS - "Are EJBs necessary?" or something like that. I cannot find the white paper link now.

    I feel your sinking ship needs a J2EE architect. He can only tell whether the current design (including using the framework from the small company) is good or bad.

    Best of luck.
  3. J2EE unproductive[ Go to top ]

    At least the framework should have been nearly finished before we start to use it.

    Now we have to refactor a lot because the framework constantly changes and new features are added which we have to add to our programs too.

    Further the documentation is really bad of that framework. We have to do the documentation by ourself.

    This whole thing IS a bad decision. But if the management knows that it is a bad solution, they will stop this project and use SAP instead. Then we will be fired. So the developers try to see the ship not sinking.

    I don't need to be a J2EE architect to see how unproductive we are.
  4. J2EE unproductive[ Go to top ]

    This has nothing to do with J2EE and everything to do with decisions, knowledge and experience. This sounds more like a problem with project management and your team's development skill-set to me. You either chose the wrong technologies, or don't know how to properly use the ones you chose. This lack of producivity has to do more with people than the technology.
  5. EJB in action![ Go to top ]

    Hans,

    "This framework is not finished and is on top of EJB"

    If it is any consolation to you I can ensure you that even if you had all IBM + Sun resources behind you would not land this project..

    Jason:"This lack of producivity has to do more with people than the technology"

    LOL

    Regards
    Rolf Tollerud
  6. EJB in action![ Go to top ]

    Hans,

    >
    > "This framework is not finished and is on top of EJB"
    >
    > If it is any consolation to you I can ensure you that even if you had all IBM + Sun resources behind you would not land this project..
    >
    > Jason:"This lack of producivity has to do more with people than the technology"
    >
    > LOL
    >
    > Regards
    > Rolf Tollerud

    I don't know exactly what you want to tell me.

    If we had a framework of a large company like IBM then it would be likely that the framework is of a good quality. And we would have a good documentation (Javadoc, Handbooks, Books, Forums, Tutorials in internet and so on) and good training by various companies.

    So the problem is not really the people. The problem is the unfinished state of the framework, its quality and its poor documentation. We have constantly to refactor our code because the framework changed. There are many interim solutions. This is one cause for unproductiveness, even if we had the best people in the world.

    Another problem is the hierarchy in our "team". Three team members get all the time to learn about various features of the framework, make a documentation and all the other people have to work with it. This waterfall model is both team killing and unefficient. The problem is also that these three people are no luminaries.

    The project goal has already been cropped to the half. And still it is very difficult to reach the cropped goal.

    There are a lot of errors which nobody knows where they come from (own code, framework, IDE, server, deployment, database ...)
  7. Sauerkraut? (Sorry ;-))[ Go to top ]

    I always admired the Germans for their industry, efficiency and productivity. Now you're telling me everywhere's the same when it comes to IT. Good Lord! What's the world coming to?

    Pass me that bottle of "weis" beer, will you?.. :-)
  8. Sauerkraut? (Sorry ;-))[ Go to top ]

    I am new on the job experience.

    You know the Peter principle?

    The people in power are the ones who have not the skill to be in their position. The good people leave the company, the bad people stay.

    A good programer is promoted to a project leader. As a project leader he is bad. But he stays on his position since he cannot be good enough to be promoted again. So after a while we have the worst people at the highest positions, making decisions which lose companies money and destroy jobs.

    But you have to be quiet, not criticize them, if you want to keep your job.

    Sorry, it has not much to do with EJB. It is a pure luxery for our company to build a ERP with not enough know how and with spending much money instead of buying SAP software.