Java trends: Scripting languages

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News: Java trends: Scripting languages

  1. Java trends: Scripting languages (11 messages)

    Java is still less than a decade old, but it's taken hold of the dev world. It's even spawned Java-esque scripting languages, such as BeanShell and Jess. A builder.com article looks at the increasing incidence of scripting languages in the Java realm and the pluses and minuses of using them.

    Read Java trends: Scripting languages.

    Threaded Messages (11)

  2. I also invite you to check out my JUG Austria talk slides in an all-in-one HTML version (no PowerPoint, thank you) entitled "Python and Jelly: Scripting Power for Java and XML: Do More With Less (Lines Of Code)".

    It's a fast-paced, example packed Python Scripting intro for Java Hackers (40+ slides). It also includes a scripting motor catalog listing many alternatives in 100 % Java such as Tcl, Ruby, Smalltalk, Scheme and and many more.

    Enjoy.
  3. Glitch in the Matrix[ Go to top ]

    It happens when they change something.
  4. Java requires recompile the project after some changes has been made. It is really disadvantage, because takes a lot of time of the whole development cycle. Script does not require recompilation, but is it only one decision of the problem?
    We use "compilation-on-demand" paradigm for our own framework, when the framework in the design-time watches for changes and recompiles only the changed classes on-the-fly. Developer does not need to push compile button and, even, does not need to save the project. Any changes take effect immediately in running application.
    I do not say that scripting is bad, I just mean that Java still has it own reserves.

    Regards,
    Sergey Smirnov
    Exadel Inc.

    P.S. [OT] It looks like déjà vu. The topic with this subject was there yesterday and appears again. In the same time the first post about Exadel Struts Studio evoked interest and many people asked us about Linux version. We did version for Linux and posted the News to TheServerSite, but the post had been banned.
    I have nothing again the author of the current post, I just wonder, why TSS staff ignore some posts, but some post appears twice.
  5. Java vs. Scripting languages[ Go to top ]

    We use "compilation-on-demand" paradigm for our own framework, when the framework in the design-time watches for changes and recompiles only the changed classes on-the-fly. Developer does not need to push compile button and, even, does not need to save the project. Any changes take effect immediately in running application. I do not say that scripting is bad, I just mean that Java still has it own reserves.

    Still, Java ain't scriptable. Every Java snippet must explicitly reside in a class.
  6. Java vs. Scripting languages[ Go to top ]

    I mentioned it: "Compilation-on-demand works in the Design-time".
    What the benifits you will have in production, using script vs. java?
  7. I'm not sure if I understand your assertion. You can definitely support scripting at runtime, either compiled to a dynamically loaded class or interpreted (and interpreted could be either script interpretation or p-code). Out of those three options, I've personally witnessed the first and second in use, and I've heard of p-code implementations in Java as well. Things like reflection make this all possible at runtime.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Easily share live data across a cluster!
  8. Java vs. Scripting languages[ Go to top ]

    I'm not sure if I understand your assertion.

    There's no such thing as interpreted Java statements.
  9. Java vs. Scripting languages[ Go to top ]

    Hi Brian:

    There's no such thing as interpreted Java statements.

    That is a very bold claim, considering we use something very similar to just that for our test scripts. It's not built into Java, that's true ... is that what you were trying to say? But with reflection, most of it is very simple.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Easily share live data across a cluster!
  10. Java vs. Scripting languages[ Go to top ]

    There's no such thing as interpreted Java statements.

    >
    > That is a very bold claim, considering we use something very
    > similar to just that for our test scripts. ...
    > with reflection, most of it is very simple.

    You're likely right. So why script a JVM with a language other
    than Java statements?
  11. Java vs. Scripting languages[ Go to top ]

    Brian: "You're likely right. So why script a JVM with a language other than Java statements?"

    I couldn't answer that question ... I think it's entering into the realm of opinion, and too many of us have too many of those ;-)

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Easily share live data across a cluster!
  12. Actually there is another interesting case: we are scripting JVM with bytecode in our productÂ…

    Serguei Mourachov
    www.velare.com