Riflexo launches JCredo, a free compliant JDO implementation

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News: Riflexo launches JCredo, a free compliant JDO implementation

  1. Riflexo has announced JCredo, an implementation of the JDO specification for the management of persistent data. JCredo Thunderbolt alpha is available on www.jcredo.com for evaluation. The standard edition is to be FREE. Full product release, including Standard and Enterprise versions, is scheduled on September 15, 2003. JCredo integrates with many dev environments, and has good support for databases and application servers.

    Riflexo is currently distributing JCredo’s Standard Edition with a life-time free licence to all new users who will have registered before December 31, 2003. Jcredo Thunderbolt alpha is available on www.jcredo.com for testing. Full product release, including Standard and Enterprise versions, is scheduled on September 15, 2003.
     
    Jcredo is 100% compliant with Sun’s JDO specification 1.0 and 1.0.1 and passed all Sun’s compatibility tests. The Standard Edition offers full integration with development environments such as Jbuilder, Eclipse, IBM WASD and NetBeans and supports Oracle, MySQL, Microsoft SQLServer, PostgreSQL, PointBase and InterBase databases. The Enterprise Edition will support BEA Weblogic, Borland, IBM WebSphere, Jboss, Macromedia Jrun, Oracle9iAS, SunOne iPlanet, Sybase EAServer and Tomcat application and web servers.

    Information from the company:

    "The main advantages of JCredo are it’s usability, with the support of developers tools such as ant and console, the full integration to IDEs, the automatic schema generation and class enhancement on runtime; its pluggability to JDBC compliant databases through public API and the support of a wide range of Second Class Objects (more than the JDO spec mandates); the possibility for the programmer to define its own persisting strategies for non persistence capable instances; and its high performance with efficient caches, advanced query-to-SQL transformation", says Stanimir Simeonoff, CTO of Riflexo.

    With the free distribution of JCredo, Riflexo chose an aggressive commercial strategy which is similar to the Open Source model, in the sense that revenues only come from services such as support, integrations and documentation. However, users will benefit from the full support and quality control offered by a commercial product, and the back-up of fully dedicated engineers and a customer-oriented staff.

    "We’re currently offering a free product competing with the best existing JDO implementations and we’re willing to carry out this strategy until the end of 2003. If results are positive, we could decide to continue in 2004. We hope that this strategy will contribute to help JDO spread-out among the developers’ community, who now have the possibility to test, learn and use JDO in their professional project implementations for free. JDO offers significant advantages compared to the existing alternative technologies for data persistence, both in terms of database access layer and ROI. Using JCredo improves developers’ ROI further, as they don’t need to invest in similar products, usually sold between 600 and 1600 euros", says Rodolfo Festa Bianchet, CEO of Riflexo.


    JCredo’s technical benefits include:

    - Large result sets support via server side cursors and in memory caching.
    - Runtime query tuning. Queries can be optimized to fetch only table columns requested by the developer.
    - Full support for java.util Collection framework including real O/R mapping for List and PC classes as keys in Map.
    - Enhanced support for Interface mapping allowing co-existence of PC and non-PC instances.
    - Auto enhancement of classes and synchronization of datastore schema with object model on development time.
    - Extensive pluggable sequencers support including: native datastore sequencers, industry standard high-low sequencers, and light system-time based and cluster-enabled sequencer.
    - Flexible and customizable String externalization of SCOs including limited JDOQL support.
    - Prepared statements caching and batch execution.
    - Better class discriminator column for datastore type PC classes
    - Vast real life example in web forum ‘Senat’ - featuring real benefits of clear object model of POJO (Plain Old Java Objects) vitalized with JDO

    JCredo JDO can be downloaded for evaluation on www.jcredo.com

    It is unclear what will be different between the free Standard Edition, and the Enterprise Edition. If anyone knows more, please post here

    Threaded Messages (21)

  2. Hi Ppl,

    JDO seems to be gaining some traction. Although "big" app server vendors still don't support it out of the box. For reasons best known to them (and ourselves I guess) ;-)

    Just posted somthing similar in the discussion ... I know the main differences between JDO and CMP2.0 but based on your knowlege of both SPECS would you say that:

    1. the implementation of one persistence mechanism (comparing JDO and CMP2.0) would perform inherently faster than the other as a result of a "feature" in either SPECS (e.g because of possible cacheing stratergies allowed, or limitations of possible caching stratergies because of restrictions in the SPECS/framework, e.g. navigation of relationships in the case of CMP2.0, batch updates, etc)? Or would you say that both JDO and CMP2.0 have the same problems? I'm basing this question on the _SPECS ONLY_ and possibly some vendor's extentions of the spec (e.g "readonly" settings, etc, not other factors like ease of development, etc).

    2. Also what about the behaviour of JDO and CMP2.0 entites in distributed environments (that word again ;-) )? Any advantages of one over the other? By distributed I mean clustered enviroments. we can consider 2 cases (and many more if you wish... ;-) )

    a) one where all the data in the caches on each node in the cluster has to be in "synch" (which is rather difficult anyway) and

    b) One where all the data in the caches on each node in the cluster can be out of synch (i.e. where "readonly" with a refesh after a time-out might be appropriate)

    Do either specs actually cater for distributed caches?

    I realise that these are very general questions and might depend on the use cases but any thoughts?

    Smythe
  3. JDO clustering[ Go to top ]

    Smythe: 2. Also what about the behaviour of JDO and CMP2.0 entites in distributed environments (that word again ;-) )? Any advantages of one over the other? By distributed I mean clustered enviroments. we can consider 2 cases (and many more if you wish... ;-) )

    Both Solarmetric KODO JDO and Hemtech JDOGenie support clustered JDO (using Coherence.) (This is not at all to take away from Riflexo JCredo, which as of yet I know nothing about, but it's good to see more interest in JDO.)

    Smythe: one where all the data in the caches on each node in the cluster has to be in "synch" (which is rather difficult anyway)

    I don't know their exact implementation, but they could accomplish exactly that, since Coherence provides full coherency for clustered caches, cluster-wide locking, and even cache transaction management.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Easily share live data across a cluster!
  4. JDO and App Server vendors[ Go to top ]

    JDO seems to be gaining some traction. Although "big" app server vendors still don't support it out of the box. For reasons best known to them (and ourselves I guess) ;-)


    Eric>>>You're right, but you've probably noticed the 2 leading Open Source App Servers (JBoss and JOnAS) announced they will support JDO soon.
    Also I've heard the current CMP implementation of Sun One Server 7 is internally based on a JDO compliant layer.

    Maybe in the future more and more EJB container will delegate their persistence mechanism to an underlying JDO layer ? This would at least allows to have a pluggable persistence layer.

    I think JDO and CMP are not really competing technologies.
    JDO is for fine-grained object persistence, while CMP is for large-grained component persistence.
    Also JDO supports all Java concepts and is independent from any middleware (your business model can be used from EJBs, or directly from JSPs or even from a simple standalone Java application).

    Best Regards, Eric.
  5. JDO and App Server vendors[ Go to top ]

    Also I've heard the current CMP implementation of Sun One Server 7 is internally based on a JDO compliant layer.

    I keep hearing this but when I tried to verify it in Sun's docs, I couldn't find any evidence of it. Do you have any direct link?

    It seems to me this is just a rumor based on a presentation that Craig made some time ago that it's theoretically possible to do a BMP implementation on top of JDO (strange idea if you ask me).

    And since then, everybody says they "heard that Sun's CMP implementation is based on JDO"...

    --
    Cedric
    http://beust.com/weblog
  6. JDO and App Server vendors[ Go to top ]

    Also I've heard the current CMP implementation of Sun One Server 7 is internally based on a JDO compliant layer.

    Cedric: I keep hearing this but ... It seems to me this is just a rumor ... (strange idea if you ask me). And since then, everybody says they "heard that Sun's CMP implementation is based on JDO"...

    Hmm ... looks like somebody has app-server envy ;-)

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Easily share live data across a cluster!
  7. JDO and App Server vendors[ Go to top ]

    Cedric,

    The SunONE appserver 7's CMP implementation IS definately based on JDO. You have to configure PersistenceManagers in the server before you can use CMP (bind it to JNDI, etc) and the CMP classes it generates (and exceptions thrown ;-)) also reference some jdo packages (their implementation I guess) Its docs also talk about the pluggable PM implementations mentioned earlier. However I'm not too sure if is is accessible within the Appserver without using CMP as there is no mention of that in their docs.

    Cheers

    Smythe
  8. JDO and App Server vendors[ Go to top ]

    The SunONE appserver 7's CMP implementation IS definately based on JDO.

    Okay, finally something concrete. Or almost. Do you have any link or hard data that I could go read?

    --
    Cedric
    http://beust.com/weblog
  9. JDO and App Server vendors[ Go to top ]

    what i could turn up on google in 5 mins

    the section about Configuring the Resource Manager at http://docs.sun.com/source/816-7151-10/decmp.html

    the section about known container-managed persistence (CMP) issues and
    associated solutions at
    http://docs-pdf.sun.com/817-2164-10/817-2164-10.pdf

    it does seem to definitly use jdo
  10. JDO and App Server vendors[ Go to top ]

    I can't see why J2ee Open source developers don't concentrate on one main project in evey field? We have already Hibernate among many other impls which can do the job!
    Fa
  11. JDO and App Server vendors[ Go to top ]

    I can't see why J2ee Open source developers don't concentrate on one main project in evey field? We have already Hibernate among many other impls which can do the job!


    It because there are a lot of ways to implement data access and there is no the best way for everybody.

    > Fa
  12. Unique OSS initiatives[ Go to top ]

    The fact a product is packaged as Open Source doesn't prevent his leader to have his strong own vision and opinions on what the market needs.
    There is the same kind of competition between OSS projects as between commercial products.
    And maybe this competition is good for the users ?
    Having to choose between different solution is a difficult task, but it is better than not having the choice.

    Look at the competition between JOnAS and JBoss in the App Server arena. Both have different visions, but both bring added-value to their own users.

    I think some Open Source O/R mapping tools were already available before Hibernate started. But Gavin had his own view on what O/R mapping should be. He decided to create his own story, instead of contributing to Castor, OJB or any other older existing initiative. This was a nice decision for satisfied Hibernate users, that maybe were not convinced by Castor (or any other product).

    Conversely, Gavin decided not to support JDO, while Jakarta/OJB decided to support it.
    This is great for Open Source users who believe JDO is an important standard.


    As Cameron usually said, Peace.
    Best Regards, Eric Samson.
  13. Unique OSS initiatives[ Go to top ]

    Eric,

    I agree. Hibernate is an excellent OR tool but limits you to only their model. OJB offers some important things. Because of its architecture, different specs (among other things) can be easily supported. Right now OJB offers their own PersistenceBroker, ODMG support, and JDORI support (with a full JDO implementation in the works).

    Choice is a good thing here. In fact, I'm currently mostly using the Persistence Broker, but use the ODMG side for some things.

    As for clustering an OR mapper or something like JDO, you can easily cluster in an environment where you are using optimistic locking. That includes a cache, as long as the cache supports clustering/distribution (Tangosol and OSCache both support this).

    Jason McKerr
    Northwest Alliance for Computational Science and Engineering
  14. SUnONE based on JDO[ Go to top ]

    It seems to me this is just a rumor based on a presentation that Craig made some time ago that it's theoretically possible to do a BMP implementation on top of JDO (strange idea if you ask me).


    Eric>>>>>>>>To me the strange idea, is the notion of BMP itself :-)
    (It's a joke please don't attack me).


    > And since then, everybody says they "heard that Sun's CMP implementation is based on JDO"...

    Eric>>>>>>>>>In fact, I don't want to speak for Sun, and I don't know why they don't communicate more on this, this is why I always use some kind of protection when I say that.
    I'd like to have someone from Sun confirming this once for all, because I'm almost sure they are using a kind of JDO compliant layer internally (I don't have the details). I'm almost sure because different people from Sun in different countries (including Calfornia and France) confirmed it during various kind of discussions (technical, business, VCs...).

    To me (I know you maybe don't agree) there is a logic to have the internal layer of CMP clearly defined, and JDO could be perfect for that. JBoss and JOnAS (well-known open source app servers) are also going on the same direction. We could imagine in the future that one user will be able to choose the mapping layer under the CMP mode, based on his needs, constraints, etc. This could be possible only if there is a clear defintion of the protocol between the App server and the DB. IMHO, this is where JDO could help (this is not the only possibility).

    Please note, these are just my thoughts, not an attack against EJB.

    Best Regards,
  15. FREE?[ Go to top ]

    Not really fair to say it's free when the press release basically says it is free until they start charging. Anyway, I don't mind paying for a commercial JDO implementation provided the support is good and the product meets my needs better than the OS flavor. JDO is probably one of the few technologies that I would actually recommend my department pay for these days ... in fact, it's worth more to me than an app server in terms of day-to-day productivity.
  16. Geoff: it's fair to say it's free because, if you download the Standard Edition of JCredo from now until December 31,2003, you'll have a life-time free licence to use the product. Only value-added services will be charged to users. Our goal is to help JDO become the standard it deserves to be for database access and persistent data management. With JCredo, developers can start using JDO right now, and for free.
    Best regards, Emmanuelle
  17. The Enterprise edition of JCredo will support BEA Weblogic, Borland, IBM WebSphere, JBoss, Macromedia JRun, Oracle9iAS, SunOne iPlanet, Sybase EAServer and Tomcat application and web servers. It will also give support to third party middleware services(distributed caches such as Tangosol), and, when necessary, support and configuration tools for the supported Enterprise Information Services.

    Best regards, Emmanuelle
  18. Riflexo Quict Start[ Go to top ]

    "The Standard Edition offers full integration with development environments
    such as Jbuilder, ....". But I cannot find any information about how to
    integrate Riflexo to any IDE within the download. Do I need pay it?

    Thanks,

    Tony
  19. Riflexo Quick Start[ Go to top ]

    Tony: the version you downloaded is the alpha version which doesn't include IDE integration modules. The beta version, which will be released in 2 weeks, has full integration to JBuilder and Eclipse. These modules are sold separetely as add-ons to the product (JCredo licence without integration remains free). You'll have 30 day free-trial of the IDE integrations, after which you can decide whether you want to buy it or not.

    For more information on pricing , visit http://www.jcredo.com/home/jcredo-pricing.jsp

    Best regards
    Emmanuelle
    Riflexo
  20. Inherited Transactions?[ Go to top ]

    Does it inherit container-managed transactions? Or does the code have to explicity commit/rollback changes?
    This isn't a required section of the JDO spec, but it sure would be nice.
  21. CMT and JDO[ Go to top ]

    Most JDO implementations (LiDO, Kodo...) actually support CMT, it means you don't have to manually demark transactions.
    My reading of the JDO spec was CMT is a mandatory feature in a managed environment (J2EE), but maybe you're right.

    Best Regards, Eric Samson.
  22. CMT and JDO[ Go to top ]

    JDO Genie, for example, only supports CMT in the Enterprise Edition.