Discussions

Performance and scalability: Application server choices

  1. Application server choices (9 messages)

    Hi,

    I need some advice on choosing a powerful / reliable application server.

    We’re in the process of quoting for a large web site contract that at during peak times has 5,000 unique visitors per hour. The content of the site is customized to each cookie-bearing visitor and also provides searching functionality. Therefore the site will require an application server to be able to do rapid data retrieval and formatting.

    The client is reasonably vendor neutral however they wish to develop the site using JSP so it obviously must support Java.

    Hopefully this is enough information, what are my choices?

    Cheers

    Threaded Messages (9)

  2. Application server choices[ Go to top ]

    Call me biased but my favourite has always been Weblogic from BEA.
    I have used OC4J from Oracle too, but have found Weblogic to be the most robust and scalable so far. Also has decent support and good documentation.
    Also, weblogic has almost always been rated as the #1 app server.
  3. Application server choices[ Go to top ]

    I pretty much have to agree that Weblogic is the way to go. My comparisons have mostly been Websphere vs. Weblogic, and I have always found Weblogic to work better.
  4. weblogic is the best[ Go to top ]

    Hello!!

    I was working wit websphere and weblogic, and weblogic is to easy for use, and it is more scalable and robust.
  5. app servers[ Go to top ]

    If I had a choice, I would choose BEA Weblogic 8.1 over Websphere 5.0.2

    Are you planning to use EJB's?

    (My company does not use EJB's)
  6. useful criteria[ Go to top ]

    Hi

    So if one was to choose between Oracle, Websphere or Weblogic using the following criteria what would happen?

    1. Cost

    2. MSUs/sec

    3. Initial deployment (how hard / how long)

    4. Re-deployment (additional and new EJBs)

    5. IDE
    - deployment tool
    - CVS
    - performance monitoring

    6. Meantime to failure

    7. Support

    - user groups
    - documentation
    - journal subscription

    What does everyone think of these criteria? Without this sort of thing it's difficult to talk to Clients.
  7. It is advisable to compare two or more app servers before we go live.
    There are many app servers available in the market.famous being Weblogic,Websphere,Jboss etc.

    Compare these app servers based on their cost (license cost),minimum requirements,performance,upgradation cost,availability of documentation,technical support,stability or maturity of the app server etc..

    I think u can comapre Weblogic v/s websphere v/s Jboss.
    Use Jboss if it meets ur requirements b'cause you can save customers cost since it is a open source.Also compare the performace and load balancing.

    Also make sure that u use matured version of app server since app servers version change frequently customer can't keep upgrading whatever the latest versions introduced in the market.

    Ur choice depends on the actual requirements of the customer.Choose accordingly..

    Regards,
    Nagaraj Kulkarni
  8. Compare these app servers based on their cost (license cost),minimum requirements,performance,upgradation cost,availability of documentation,technical support,stability or maturity of the app server etc..

    I think u can comapre Weblogic v/s websphere v/s Jboss.
    Use Jboss if it meets ur requirements b'cause you can save customers cost since it is a open source.Also compare the performace and load balancing.
  9. Compare these app servers based on their cost (license cost),minimum >requirements,performance,upgradation cost,availability of documentation,technical >support,stability or maturity of the app server etc..


    If cost is an big issue then go for Jboss.

    >I think u can comapre Weblogic v/s websphere v/s Jboss.
    >Use Jboss if it meets ur requirements b'cause you can save customers cost since >it is a open source.Also compare the performace and load balancing.

    JBOSS has has definitely got a good performance and load balancing, no doubt about that.

    If cost is not an issue then customers requirements will lead to the choice of application servers.
    Some of them has really got some Cool....(Sometimes Cool costs money :-)) features.
    So u will have to balance with the above mentioned criteris in the post.

    Vishal.
    http://www.tusc.com.au
  10. Not quite so clear-cut[ Go to top ]

    Vishal: If cost is an big issue then go for Jboss.

    The license is only one aspect of cost. You also have training, support, cost of development, and the cost of operations. I've seen cases in which JBoss was the most cost effecting, and cases in which it was significantly more expensive than the "expensive" application servers.

    When it's clearly less expensive is when you have an application that will run on an existing server machine that is already paid for and the machine is not being used and the application already works on JBoss and you already have sufficient JBoss expertise to manage it.

    On the other hand, for a lot of applications, the cost of JBoss is infinite (or at least indefinite), for example if there are 2PC financial services transactions, because you must verify that the "complex" parts of JBoss work, like recoverable transactions. This isn't FUD ... there's a reason why people still buy Tuxedo (ouch).

    Again, my point is that JBoss is not definitely cheaper; it all depends on the application. Our customers include sites with some of the largest WebLogic, WebSphere and JBoss clusters in the world, so I hear quite an earful about the ups and downs of each ;-).

    Vishal: JBOSS has has definitely got a good performance and load balancing, no doubt about that.

    It all depends on the application. For some types of entity EJB applications, I've seen performance comparisons that put WebLogic out ahead by an order of magnitude or more, which for anything but the simplest application would more than pay for the WebLogic license cost (since JBoss was hammering the database.) (Disclaimer: I didn't personally write or tune or configure the app or the servers, so I don't know if all the applicable entity EJB optimizations were used with JBoss. Even so, the WebLogic entity EJB container is the most advanced in the field, for what it's worth.)

    JBoss itself (just like WebLogic and WebSphere) cannot do *any* load balancing for most applications -- usually people put a load balancer (h/w or apache + mod_*) in front of JBoss (just like WebLogic and WebSphere) and make sure their apps are stateless and optimistically transactionable.

    Again, it all depends on the application. It's obviously true that the "free" license cost gives JBoss an edge for a good number of projects.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Clustered JCache for Grid Computing!