Enterprise Web Services JSR: Axis and Geronimo to work together

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News: Enterprise Web Services JSR: Axis and Geronimo to work together

  1. Isn't it nice to see collaboration? The Apache Axis group is starting to work with the Geronimo group on implementing JSR 109: Implementing Enterprise Web Services. JSR109 defines the Web Services for J2EE architecture. It does not interfere with the J2EE components functionality, rather, opens a new avenue to access them as web services. JOnAS also put their hat in the ring to help the effort, which would result in JOnAS / Axis integration.

    There is a proposal for this work on the Wiki: JSR 109 Proposal

    There is also a proposed architecture: JSR 109 Architecture

    Isn't it great to see different groups working together like this?

    View the JSR 109 Detail page: JSR 109: Implementing Enterprise Web Services

    Threaded Messages (5)

  2. What is the current status of Geronimo?[ Go to top ]

    I didn't think Geronimo was ready for primetime, but maybe it is. I couldn't figure out their status on their site. I have been very impressed by Tomcat, and I would love Geronimo fill the Apache J2ee slot.
  3. Enhydra and Axis[ Go to top ]

    You will also here big news very soon on Enhydra and Axis !

    Greetings.

    Alfred Madl
  4. Looking at the JSR109 architecture and goals, I was wondering what was the difference with the goals of JSR109 and WSIF. WSIF is solving the integration with various J2EE components using WSDL extensions. Could someone comment on this ?
  5. Looking at the JSR109 architecture and goals, I was wondering what was the difference with the goals of JSR109 and WSIF. WSIF is solving the integration with various J2EE components using WSDL extensions.

    JSR 109 brings vendor neutrality to web service components. WSIF makes it easy to migrate a component between arbitrary frameworks (including, but not limited to web services).

    WSDL and components are both used by WSIF and JSR 109, but that's the extent of the similarity. JSR 109 is more limited in scope: it requires SOAP and supports only servlet or stateless session bean. WSIF doesn't dictate component type, and doesn't require J2EE. WSIF doesn't dictate a wire protocol or wire format -- it doesn't even need a socket -- one intended use is to integrate Java classes in process.
  6. So if I understand you, WSIF is once again proving that open source packages are fulfilling direct needs from real developers.
    Some companies like Collaxa, implementor of the WBPEL (Web Service Biz Process language) specification, is using WSIF in order to have all components integrated into a complex workflow.
    It would be nice to have some representation from Open Source orgs. like Apache, JBoss, ObjectWeb, ... to be included into these JSRs.
    But this is another entire topic which has already been covered at TSS.