What would you like to see at JavaOne 2004?

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News: What would you like to see at JavaOne 2004?

  1. What would you like to see at JavaOne 2004? (52 messages)

    I'm a member of the JavaOne program committee and I'd like to ask for your help. The "Call for Papers" for JavaOne San Francisco 2004 closed a few weeks ago. We received over 2000 submissions for Technical Sessions, Panels and BOFs. We're going to need to narrow that down drastically to fit into the time and space allotted for the conference. We've started the long process of sorting through the submissions and we'd like to solicit input from the Java community on what they'd like to see at the conference next year. Please post any suggestions you have on sessions you'd like to see. We want to know what it's going to take to get as many developers as possible at the show!

    Steve Wilson
    Engineering Director
    Developer Platforms
    Sun Microsystems

    Threaded Messages (52)

  2. More talks from the real world[ Go to top ]

    I don't know what others thought at the last JavaOne. I definitely thought that there was a lack of talks from non-Sun employees. No offense to these guys, but I think JavaOne should have more talks from people doing other great things with Java in the industry. This would also make the conference feel more like JavaOne than SunOne.
  3. More talks from the rest of the world[ Go to top ]

    Dion: I don't know what others thought at the last JavaOne. I definitely thought that there was a lack of talks from non-Sun employees. No offense to these guys, but I think JavaOne should have more talks from people doing other great things with Java in the industry. This would also make the conference feel more like JavaOne than SunOne.

    Ditto. Try to coalesce some of the submitted talks; get someone from Sun on the stage if you must but if it's a J2EE topic (for example) then grab someone too from BEA, IBM, Apache, JBoss, and Oracle, so that the presentations have some balance and perspective. Last year, it seemed like 95% of the technical tracks were all Sun. If I wanted to go to an inbred single-vendor show, I'd go to Microsoft PDC again.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Clustered JCache for Grid Computing!
  4. More talks from the rest of the world[ Go to top ]

    Totally true. Last years JavaOne and most people remarked should have been called SunOne. We need to go back to the style of previous years where all Java groups be they Vendors, Open Source projects, industry gurus etc get a look in.

    Also include more people who are not from the big Java vendors, especially if they want to talk about how they implemented and rolled out a successful project. The best session I went to last year was at the very end when a consulting group from Belgium talked about how they implemented projects using XP. Theses guys nailed it and made me walk away from JavaOne with a smile on my face. More people like that please.

    David
  5. Belgium[ Go to top ]

    The best session I went to last year was at the very end when a consulting group from Belgium talked about how they implemented projects using XP. Theses guys nailed it and made me walk away from JavaOne with a smile on my face. More people like that please.

    >

    Thanks for the support David!! The two guys (me and Bart) from Belgium work for a company called JCS (www.jcs.be). We have again submitted a few talks for JavaOne 2004 and are now sacrificing chickens to get selected ;-)

    Cheers,
    Stephan
  6. I attended that session too. God, was that a mistake. No, actually it wasn't. Never had such a good laugh.

    If I may have one say about what I think should not be programmed on next Year's JavaOne...

    The reason for David's smile must have been that he had never seen such an idiot session before on JavaOne. Those guys really thought they had reinvented the wheel better than someone ever did before. They mixed some general book knowledge with the hope that they would be recognized as the big experts and the cocktail resulting was, yeah, it is difficult to describe, I leave it up to everyone's own imagination. But certainly worth a lot of laughing.
  7. FOCUS ON VALUES[ Go to top ]

    It was never our intention to position ourselves as experts! On the contrary, we gave all due credit to numerous authors providing the audience an overview of conventions, patterns, best-practices, ... and HOWTO apply these pragmatically in a J2EE environment insprired by XP-techniques.

    We applied a similar approach frequently to guide teams from chaos to structure, introducing a lightweight, effective and pleasant mehtodology relying on common(uity) sense.

    We have felt that humour stimulates acceptance!

    We apologize if the abstract did not meet your expectations.

    An idiot,

    Bart Strubbe
  8. Strippers.
  9. You stole my reply!!!
  10. I second that![ Go to top ]

    I'd like to see one with a cowboy hat on!
  11. JavaOne 2004[ Go to top ]

    I would like to see:

    1) A session that discusses dynamic generation of PDF files
        in a server-side application. (I submitted a proposal on this very topic :)

    2) Instance-based Access Control in enterprise applications

        My company found J2EE's role-based security
        insufficient for our enterprise applications. We built our
        own instance-level security framework.

    The J2EE 1.4 specification contains a brief note about this topic:

    {{

    J2EE.3.7.2 Instance-based Access Control

    Some applications need to control access to their data based on the content of the data, rather than simply the type of the data. We refer to this as “instance-based” rather than “class-based” access control. We hope to address this in a future release.

    }}
  12. JavaOne 2004[ Go to top ]

    2) Instance-based Access Control in enterprise applications

    >
    > My company found J2EE's role-based security
    > insufficient for our enterprise applications. We built our
    > own instance-level security framework.
    >
    > The J2EE 1.4 specification contains a brief note about this topic:
    >
    > {{
    >
    > J2EE.3.7.2 Instance-based Access Control
    >
    > Some applications need to control access to their data based on the content of the data, rather than simply the type of the data. We refer to this as “instance-based” rather than “class-based” access control. We hope to address this in a future release.

    If you're using JBoss, then an interceptor should be able to encapsulate these types of security requirements.

    Bill
    >
    > }}
  13. Java in the RFID space[ Go to top ]

    I would like to see how Java technologies are being used in high profile areas such as RFID & Utility Computing.
  14. Real World == Open Source[ Go to top ]

    I'd like to echo the comments from Dion and Cameron about making it real world. To me, that means really giving the developers the information they need to get their jobs done. Yes, its nice to hear about all the new wiz-bang specs and the future, but to get my job done today, best practices says I should be using Ant, Tapestry, Lucene, Jakarta Commons Logging, Hibernate (or Cayenne?!), and many other open source gems.

    In my experience of traveling with the No Fluff, Just Stuff symposiums and speaking to developers around the country - they really want information on these open source Java projects beyond just the hype.

    (in other words, accept my two proposals! :)
  15. SunOne can't be fixed[ Go to top ]

    SunOne I perceive as PowerPoint sales pitches by people who do not not have recent experience of production aps, ie, they have a theory, but they never operated it in productions. At most they can get it to work in lab conditions. Think of the TV show "Pretender".
    Java Newbies actualy try to do what those "experts" sell. Oops.
    That is how "One" gains experience! PetStore, right.

    OpenSource is done by people that USE the stuff, so it works in real life. OpenSource has many online cost effective communities with great support.

    I do not think Sun has much market share, if everyone would just ignore Sun press releases, that would go a long way. Who cares about Sun having an iPlanet+NetBeans sales seminar? And you want me to PAY to be sold to?
    (This is why you want to pay for NetBean, becuase it's so great w/EJB)
    I predict a 3rd year of record ever lowest attendence and interest. IBM was not there last year. Who will drop out this year? (I wish jBoss and others would do it's own show)

    If you want to show something that would be interesting.... show a lot of ECMA standard C# CLR. Becuase any PHB who tries to do receommended ideas at JavaOne is likely to fail. PHB will conculde it must be Java, so lets go .NET.
    (I wish a few client consdier lawsuits agaist the Vendor that tells them... oh, it could work like this, and then it does not work like that)

    Of course.. if you do Java the Open Source way, it works great, better than .NET and it has great cost effective community support of... real users, who put it in production!

    Why would anyone want to present at Sun One? How many users?
    Wake up, that was years ago. Sun's way of "new way" of doing busines with no ernings and doing development without going to production is over, amen.

    .V
  16. Real World == Open Source[ Go to top ]

    I'd like to echo the comments from Dion and Cameron about making it real world. To me, that means really giving the developers the information they need to get their jobs done. Yes, its nice to hear about all the new wiz-bang specs and the future, but to get my job done today, best practices says I should be using Ant, Tapestry, Lucene, Jakarta Commons Logging, Hibernate (or Cayenne?!), and many other open source gems.

    >
    > In my experience of traveling with the No Fluff, Just Stuff symposiums and speaking to developers around the country - they really want information on these open source Java projects beyond just the hype.
    >
    > (in other words, accept my two proposals! :)

    I absolutely concur. Having attended both JavaOne and TSSS last year, the difference was HUGE in the tone. JavaOne was lots of marketing and Sun sponsored technologies. TSSS was down to earth hardcore technology.

    I'd like to see a BOF on XWork / WebWork2 :-)

    Also, emerging trends that are not invented by Sun or the JCP need some attention too, especially things like lightweight containers / IoC as an alternative architecture to EJB in a J2EE server.

    In other words, accept my two submissions too!
  17. WebWork2 Rulez![ Go to top ]

    Jason - I did not mean to leave WW2 out of my list. I definitely count it among the open source gems with the nice underlying XWork framework too.

    A web framework shootout would be a great session to have. Bring all your Sun JSF engineers, and we'll get Howard for Tapestry, Jason for WW2, oh, and Struts is deprecated, and I'm sure we could round up a few others too.
  18. Less Sun.
    Less Marketing BS.
    More J2SE
    More J2EE in REAL LIFE, not some lame XXXXX-store.

    Sun needs to pull a Balmer with the 'Developers, Developers, Developers' chat but mean it.

    Rob
    robsite.org
  19. topics I want to see at java one[ Go to top ]

    Real world uses of JMX. How can you make an application management friendly

    Inversion of control / mini containers. This is proving to be a very interesting architecture.

    Code generation. XDoclet saves a lot of time, but there are more ways to generate code than this.

    Beyond Ant. Everyone uses Ant, but I'd like to hear more about alternatives like Maven.

    Metadata. We've seen JSR175 and know the technical details. But, what can we really DO with it? I would like to see some GOOD examples.

    Scripting languages. How can Java work with ruby? Python? Etc... More importantly, WHEN can we use it?


    Those are the types of topics I'd LIKE to see. I want to see interesting APIs and tools. I really want to see how things can be used, not just what a tool does.
  20. It's a developer's conference, as as a developer I'd like to see more
    core technology talks, especially ones that give us a glimpse of new
    things to come. While the J2EE field is one such core area, I'd like
    to see different activity in basic "core Java" as well.

    At the peak of JavaOne, we used to get talks about cool new things
    like HotSpot technology well before it shipped, about new garbage
    collection behaviors well ahead of product, about JITs from Symantec,
    IBM, and others, about Swing, RMI, and JavaBeans before they were
    "real". We got to see the new things coming 1-2 years ahead, and
    know how our programming practices should evolve. Many thing that
    used to be "slow" are now "fast". Many optimizations and tradeoffs
    we used to make when Java was interpreted, stop-the-world, single
    generation GC, are now the absolute wrong thing to do. Seeing the
    coming changes allows us to prepare.

    I especially liked Doug Lea's talks about concurrency, and Click's
    talk about debunking Java performance and recommended coding
    myths. I wish we saw more of those. For some reason, both sessions
    were scheduled in small rooms (was that because they were not from
    Sun?), and we stood in lines snaking all the way to the street to
    get in to the last minute re-runs.

    It would be nice to hear from core Java vendors other than Sun,
    small or large. I found it a bit strange that talks and BOFs about
    Garbage Collection and JVM performance had noone from IBM,
    BEA/JRockit, or HP. They don't have to be the in same talk, but at
    least give them one.
  21. The irony of Java:
    1>Strong in the enterprise on the server side (weak on the desktop);
    2>Strong in the consumer space on the client side (J2ME for example).

    On the other side, Microsoft:
    1>Strong in the enterprise on the client side;
    2>Strong in the enterprise space on the client side (More Pocket PC business apps than J2ME business apps).


    It would be really interesting to see:
    1. Java on the desktop: Rich Client technologies? Can you create nice UI using Java? Any other vendors/technologies or successful projects beside Swing/JavaWebstart or SWT (BTW: it is a shame that we see some people excited about SWT. It is just another implementation of AWT with some more widgets. It has all the problems of AWT: memory hog, interoperability, platform incompatibility...).
    2. Java mobile business applications: anyone?
    3. Maybe a session on the study/comparion of NetBeans and Eclipse? Can a tool vendor develop something to run inside both NetBeans and Eclipse?
    4. Technologies/Solutions for easy-of-development?
    5. XML on the client side such as SVG, xForms, XUL? A talk on Java/XML on the client side would be interesting, considering MSFT Longhorn is .NET/XML centric.

    etc.
  22. I'm going to JavaOne for the first time next year, so how about a "First timers and Must See Guide" published beforehand so we can know what to expect and look for at the conference?
  23. Hello,

    I'm interested in the J2EE persistency frameworks. Sometimes it is too
    tedious to get something to work. I have a lot of experience with
    EJB's. But still, to do something fine, you have to use Design Patterns.
    The minimum in my opinion is: Session Facade (for CMR especially), EJB CMP,
    Business Delegate, ServiceLocator and Data Tranfer Object.

    If I look at JDO, I was very impressed by the way they handled inheritance,
    association, etc. Any UML model, could be implemented directly !!!!!
    This can be done in a few hours. For the EJB part it would take me some
    days to translate my UML model (say about 20 classes in my class diagram).

    Oracle brings in TopLink, which shows the same behaviour as JDO.
    Other talk about Hibernate, Castor etc.

    At JavaOne 2004 it would very helpfull to elaborate on this topic.

    In these times (economically) EJB's are nice, but too much time
    is being spent to get them to work properly with CMR beyond the EJB container.

    Rokesh Jankie
  24. Mozilla-Java integration[ Go to top ]

    With the big push on the desktop I'd like to have at least a BOF if not a session on Java integration with Mozilla - especially writing XPCOM components in Java and invoking XPCOM components from Java. Current JavaScript<->Java integration in Mozilla seems to be better understood/documented, but there is very sparse knowledge about what is happeening with Java-XPCOM.
    There have been statemets abot how Mozilla and J2SE 1.5 will be "fully" integrated with each other. It would be good to see some solid examples of real world usage patterns well beyond the "Hello World" degree of difficulty.
    e.g
    1) Using XPCOM components with a JSP or Swing front end
    2) Using Mozilla XPFE as a UI for a full fledged db browser and isql tool. ( just so that we can see how the integration is donw - not because we need yet another such tool)
    3) Using Mozilla XPFE intgrated with JMS events.
    3) Debugging issues in Mozilla-Java integration

    These kinds of things. There's enough repetitive info on the "Hello World" level. We need in depth info on this level to take Mozilla into the Java world, which is needed, IMHO, to deliver fully on the Java desktop promise.
  25. Feature driven programming[ Go to top ]

    Well, i always love cribbing about how clueless Sun is or how restricted, powerless and totally lack of useful features their APIs are. (Im trying to get it out here.. im a hardcore java guy)

    What is needed is "Feature Driven Programming". NOBODY in the real world cares how your application server manages it's components. (JMX). What people want is fast development, productive development. Instead of writing JMX or something that programmers will NEVER use, Sun (They won't do it anyway.. Rest of the industry atleast) should strive for simplification of J2EE and push for java on the desktop (Im not talking about the Java Desktop. Its a joke !!!)

    What counts at the end (Im not also talking about the one or two HUGE projects in the world where there are 200 programmers) is that how much work is done in a given amount of time. Look @ Microsoft (God !! thanks for giving us Microsoft). ALL their products talk about productivity. Yupp.. They don't work many times. But, they give new features (or atleast try).

    I guess Sun's policy is... No features.. no new bugs.. smart eh?
    I know Sun will NEVER wakeup... Its high time new initiatives like IBM-BEA colloborations are formed and push java forward.

    The best thing that can happen to Sun is get acquired (NOT MERGED !!!)

    Got half of it out.. saving the rest for the next

    Dushy
  26. Hi,

    I stopped going to JavaOne two years ago, because it became harder every year to find interesting talks. Too much basic level talks, aimed at people wanting to do a Java certification. Too little advanced level talks and too little talks about real live experience (projects done with Java). And also, my feeling is that the most interesting work with Java is being done outside of Sun, and this is not reflected at all by the number of non-Sun talks.

    So, I hope to see more talks from other companies (IBM is one of the companies I would like to see more at JavaOne, but also the talks by very small companies were often very interesting), and from academia (three years ago by far the most interesting talk I saw was buy a guy from a Swiss university, but there were only two or three talks from universities !).

    I really hope Sun will listen to the suggestions and make JavaOne interesting again. Maybe it would even be better to spin off JavaOne into a separate entity (I guess this has been proposed many times already) ?

    Cheers, Luc.
  27. I completely agree with Luc.
    Also real experiences with open source implementation of Java technologies would be great. Some advanced track on J2EE clustering would be great too.

    Emmanuel
  28. SWT x Swing !
  29. J2EE and BPM[ Go to top ]

    Hi,

    BPM (Business Process Management) seems to be an upcoming topic for enterprise systems. I would like to see something about J2EE and BPM - what benefits do I have using J2EE as a BPM platform, which technologies should I use when (JCA?, JMS?, WebServices?), best practices and so on.

    Klaus
  30. J2EE and BPM[ Go to top ]

    Hi,

    >
    > BPM (Business Process Management) seems to be an upcoming topic for enterprise systems. I would like to see something about J2EE and BPM - what benefits do I have using J2EE as a BPM platform, which technologies should I use when (JCA?, JMS?, WebServices?), best practices and so on.
    >
    > Klaus

    Did you go to JavaOne last year? They had tons of people blathering about BPEL4WS, etc... stuff that's not really very useful for 99.9999% of people, since it's not interoperable or even finished yet, but very buzzword compliant.
  31. JXTA and Gaming Support[ Go to top ]

    I would like to see great coverage of JXTA (P2P technology). I would also like to know what will happen to Java3D. I know most gaming developers prefer JOGL for direct access to OpenGL, but I need a higher level OO library and I'm afraid of committing to something - Java3D - that is no longer maintained full time. There are some interesting open source alternatives to Java3D, but they aren't yet as mature (or so it appears).

    Sun - please clear up the confusion! Thanks.
  32. JXTA and Gaming Support[ Go to top ]

    Rich clients rock!


    I would like to see great coverage of JXTA (P2P technology).

    Totally.

    I would also like to know what will happen to Java3D.

    Replaced by X3D, whose reference implementation is pure Java.
  33. Less Sun Specific Crap[ Go to top ]

    The subject says it all. Last year they did not let anyone of the big sponsors have any keynotes, IBM, BEA, and others help the Java community a lot more than sun, who constantly release crappy software and is now using the java brand on stuff that isn't even Java, like the Java Desktop, which is mostly C and C++,
  34. Experinces from J2ME developers[ Go to top ]

    There was a lot of (interesting) stuff about J2ME at the last JavaOne, but most of it was explanations of new technology. I'd like to see some sessions from people who have used this stuff over the last year and can tell us what they liked/disliked, what worked, etc...
  35. I'd like to see me at Java 2004[ Go to top ]

    I put in submission #3000 to cover the scalability problems found in Java-based Web Services. In my scalability and performance studies, I found that SOAP RPC-encoded Web Service calls are not scalable with increasing sized payloads. This is especially valid now that J2EE is out with WS-I Basic Profile (no RPC-encoded) support. I would love the opportunity to speak about this at JavaOne.

    Here's the submission:

    SOAP stacks are making it into production. The problem: There are now dozens of SOAP stacks! Each brings its own deployment issues, programming interfaces, scalability and performance characteristics, and velocity. Enterprise IT managers are asking: How many SOAP stacks will we wind up supporting?

    In this session, Frank Cohen describes the four decisions you must make to deliver a scalable and well performing Web Service system into production:

    1) Deployment: Do I go for easy deployment (such as Apache Axis and BEA WebLogic Workshop's Java Web Service (JWS) system for automatic Web Service deployment from Java methods) or make it harder to deploy and easier to maintain (such as with the Java JAX-RPC APIs)?

    2) Programming Interfaces: Do I go for easy coding (such as with the using the service and client binding utilities in SunOne) or should I manually code my Web Service bindings to be ready for new standards techniques (such as ebXML, UBL/BODs, and newly popular encoding styles such as RPC-literal and SOAP with Attachments)?

    3) Scalability and Performance: SOAP stacks handle payload sizes, levels of concurrent requests, and coupling techniques differently. Each has its strengths and weaknesses.

    4) Velocity: SOAP stacks are a moving target. Should I go with a slow moving API (such as Apache SOAP and Glue) or a fast moving, often-redesigned stack (such as WebLogic Server and Systinet WASP.)? Also, how do I handle new releases?
     
    Outline: A list of the popular SOAP stacks

    The 4 Decisions You Must Make
         Deployment
         Programming interfaces
         Scalability and performance
         Velocity

    A methodology to evaluate SOAP stacks

    Tools and techniques to assist your evaluation
     
    -Frank Cohen
    http://www.pushtotest.com/ptt
  36. I would like to see more on J2SE APIs and sessions that talks about real world problems and how to solve them. Comparissons between application servers, persistence frameworks and others are good topics also.
  37. Session: How to do rich UI[ Go to top ]

    http://blueprints.macromedia.com

    A few people asked how to do rich UI or a thin client.
    Here is a good session suggestion linked above.

    The bluePrints of PetStore above work on Linux, Mac, Windoze, PocketPC, etc. and 0 run time license.
    They have a great client side data grid component, that does sorts, etc all on client side. You just drag it on stage.

    .V
  38. Topics for JavaOne[ Go to top ]

    I would expect to see the stuff that most guys out there are doing/facing with. Either technical sessions on new technologies (and how they solve our current problems) or good ways to solve the stuff we all get stuck about.
    1. Tons on Web Frameworks. JSF, Struts. You know the deal. Too much is not enough.
    2. AOP. It is cool, but most people don't use it. Probably out of fear. But if you show them AspectJ is just a compiler - no runtime programs envolved - they open up. How about showing ideas for when to use AOP?
    3. XP with J2EE.
    4. Persistence.
    5. Class loading issues - how to build a good deployment application. Don't give me an ANT lecture. I want to discuss how real life deployment application should look like, especially if my app server can be used by other applications as well.

    I've tried to collect issues we see with our customers, and common questions I saw on the forums. This is what I think most of us need. Please don't talk about how EJB 5.0 will look like - I need to solve real life problems, and now.
  39. Speakers?[ Go to top ]

    Does anyone have suggestions for speakers we should recruit? What featured speakers would make you more likely to want to attend?

    -Steve
  40. Speakers?[ Go to top ]

    Does anyone have suggestions for speakers we should recruit? What featured speakers would make you more likely to want to attend?

    >
    > -Steve

    Well, I could just say "me" but I'd like to see Rod Johnson and Gavin King in particular.
  41. Speakers?[ Go to top ]

    I would like to see Justin Murray of HP, Cupertino, CA talking about manageability and JMX.
  42. I would very much like to see Howard M. Lewis Ship (creator of Tapestry).

    Tapestry is an Apache project and is described in this book:

    http://www.manning.com/lewisship/

    Cheers, Luc.
  43. Speakers?[ Go to top ]

    Martin Fowler (Thoughtworks)
    Grady Booch (IBM)
    Richard Monson-Haefel (OpenEJB)
    Carol McDonald (Sun)
    and James Gosling, of course!
  44. Speakers[ Go to top ]

    Does anyone have suggestions for speakers we should recruit?

    > What featured speakers would make you more likely to want to attend?


    Rod Johnson
    Gavin King (Hibernate)
    Ceki Gulcu (Log4j)
  45. Speakers?[ Go to top ]

    Does anyone have suggestions for speakers we should recruit? What featured speakers would make you more likely to want to attend?

    Ray Gao: p2p grid

    Somone from CompuWare: MDA

    Someone from Apache: Batik, Cocoon

    Someone from Web3D or US Navy: Xj3D
  46. Speakers?[ Go to top ]

    Does anyone have suggestions for speakers we should recruit?

    > What featured speakers would make you more likely to want to attend?
    >

    Dennis Sosnoski (JiBX, www.jibx.org)

    David Bau (Apache XMLBeans)
  47. Thanks[ Go to top ]

    Thanks to everyone who posted suggestions. We'll be looking these over and doing our best to ensure you get some great content for JavaOne next year!

    -Steve
  48. Thanks[ Go to top ]

    Great to see SUN getting feedback from the community...

    I pretty much much written off any conferences, I've been a long time Borland Conference (Borcon) attendee; but, Borcon is really a "Windows alternative" development conference. The Borcon Java tracks are extremely lightweight...

    I would go to JavaOne, if the tracks are tackling "real world" J2EE issues.

    For example, things like:

    How to handle a lot of Lookup tables for a J2EE front end,

    How to handle 100s of Entity beans with DTOs or whatever,

    What's the best layer to handle business rules.

    How to use AOP for Business rules and where to put it,

    How to use JSR 94 with Entity and Message beans,

    How about using JMS to tag DTOs for some real distributed domain scenarios?,

    How to design clean abstraction layer, for instance, Struts, Cocoon, Web Services and Windows Clients becomes plug-in interfaces to J2EE domain layer for a "real world" application.


    You get the idea, sure sitting in tracks reciting the definition of JMS, EJB, JXTA, etc., was OK, but now we have google, so take JavaOne to the next level and deliver value. Value we can take back to our desktops to rock our projects...
  49. Learn from Best Practices[ Go to top ]

    Hi Steve,

    I would suggest taking a close look at the topics that are popular at successful conference series that are growing like "No Fluff Just Stuff" and The Server Side Symposium. Having spoken at the former, I can vouch for the interest attendees have in these topics and the effect of having good speakers. And also look at what books and articles are popular.

    I will admit to being biased (having submitted on related topics), but I think information on new technologies like AOP, JVM scripting languages and lightweight containers would be great.

    Ron
  50. Java Connector Architecture[ Go to top ]

    Would like to know about more on JCA .. and what sun has plans in near future for JCA
  51. Fundamentals, for experts.[ Go to top ]

    Last year there appeared to be great demand for session by people who actually spend a some time analysing the basic stuff we do when we do Java coding.

    Examples from Java One 2003:

    1) An engineer who'd spent a few days running some fairly basic benchmarks on a variety of JVMs and hotspot compilers and was able to show graphs of the resulting data and say "these are simple J2SE idioms to increase performance: these ones work and these don't". The session was great, really great. I arrived 15 minutes early for that session and just managed to get a seat: we started 5 minutes early coz the doors were locked since the room was full.

    2) Doug Lea's new threading/synchronization stuff. They re-ran that session, a good thing coz I was locked out the first time...

    These aren't whiz-bang niftiness using the latest trendy technology: they're the basics. By basics I don't mean "intro java bunny" sessions: they're sessions that expect a high level of technical understanding, but dish real goods on fundamentals building blocks of java. It's not hard to do that: a session on the java memory model (what does transient really do, and do jvms actually use a variable cache for each thread?), a session on "Java Security for the truly paranoid" - the hard fundamentals are useful.


    Sean
    PS: But I won't go back to JavaOne. It's an expensive trip to make just so that Sun annoy me with their obvious politics. No AspectJ, no JDO, continuing attempts to push the failed NetBeans project (apologies for the flame-bait, but it's what I think), app-server worship (I want my POJO!), etc.
  52. JavaOne 2004[ Go to top ]

    JavaOne 2004 sessions:

    http://www.javaone04.com/
  53. JavaOne 2004[ Go to top ]

    JavaOne 2004 sessions:http://www.javaone04.com/
    Session list: http://www.javaone04.com/catalog/catalog/catalog.jsp