IntelliJ IDEA 4.0 released

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News: IntelliJ IDEA 4.0 released

  1. IntelliJ IDEA 4.0 released (43 messages)

    The people over at JetBrains released version 4.0 of the popular Java IDE "IntelliJ IDEA".

    This version ships with lots of new features such as improved CVS integration, WebLogic integration, HotSwap debugging, better plugin support, Visual Designer, J2SDK 1.5 support, and much more...

    They also redesigned their main website as well as the plugin support pages.

    Visit the IntelliJ home page

    Check out the new features in version 4.0

    Editor's Note: TheServerSide uses IntelliJ IDEA, and is looking forward to 4.0!

    Threaded Messages (43)

  2. Good bye[ Go to top ]

    Its getting really hard to respect this site. Now with this endorsement of a particular tool, "Editor's Note: TheServerSide uses IntelliJ IDEA, and is looking forward to 4.0!" so what, keep your bias to yourself, so much for "free" press.

    Just when I was finally getting over TheServerSide J2EE vs .NET wrestling match promotion, you guys just can't help it. And to think, I was really planning to attend the theServerSide conference.

    Tyler, what happened to you, why did you join this company?

    We need a J2EE NPR like web site, looks like javalobby.com is the only decent one left - I'll just mark this web site as "noisy" and move on.

    But, thank you guys for the hard work that went behind creating a J2EE information portal. Hopefully your ideas will fall into the right hands for providing a free-agenda value service to the public at large.

    Adiós
  3. George,
    From JavaLobby (Posted by Rick Ross):
    >> Matt and I use IDEA every single day (even though he often laughs at me for my frequent musings about switching to Eclipse, NetBeans and others!).
    http://www.javalobby.com/thread.jspa?forumID=61&threadID=11414

    I'm a little confused by your post. I don't see how web site editors talking about their preferences is a bad thing. It would be more dishonest if they claimed they were "unbaised". (Off topic: If you think NPR is unbiased, you might be disappointed).

    Pretty soon bloggers might have opinions too...

    David
  4. Good bye[ Go to top ]

    I do not get it. What is wrong with disclosing that TSS uses this or that particular tool? Following this logic TSS should hide “cluster portability info" as well, and even refuse to admit they use Java on server, LOL.

    Personally I am very interested in knowing who uses what and I learned lots of things by looking at tools and technologies which people I respect use on daily basis.

    Note: I use IntelliJ –IDEA daily and consider it to be best IDE available.
  5. Editors can't express opinions?[ Go to top ]

    George,

    I am sorry you feel this way. This is a disclaimer letting you know that we use the tool. Yes, we use IDEA and think it is a great product. We also think Eclipse is a great product (and you will see it having JUST as many announcements). The list goes on and on. We MAY even think that product X is an AWFUL product but still give it coverage.

    The choice of whether to give a piece of news coverage is not based on what we happen to use at home. It is based on the value that we see to the community. Would TSS members want to know about this? If so we pass it on.

    We have taken some flack here at TSS. Sometimes it really irritates me to get posts like this. We work bloody hard with the community. We care about it a lot, and it can hurt when years of good work get questioned by something like this. Are we perfect? No. Is every news post perfect? No. We do our best.

    Dion
  6. Editors can't express opinions?[ Go to top ]

    Hi Dion,

    >>"We have taken some flack here at TSS. Sometimes it really irritates me to get posts like this. We work bloody hard with the community. We care about it a lot, and it can hurt when years of good work get questioned by something like this. Are we perfect? No. Is every news post perfect? No. We do our best. "

    OK, I need to reply to explain my comments.

    I just made a point about how TheServerSide made an endorsement of a product and this is not acceptable for an "open" information portal. So, naturally my post was marked as noisy. Although, my comment regarding Tyler was really inflammatory and useless, sorry for that.

    I used to love TheServerSide, every morning I couldn't wait to access the rich information and read the many threads of sharp minds. Some I agree with, others I don't - but TheServerSide didn't take sides...
  7. Good bye[ Go to top ]

    This is good news. I've been using the early access builds of release 4.0 and it really seemed like a big improvement. The IntelliJ guys seem to keep coming up with great features in every release.

    Off topic: I don't see a problem with the editor voicing his/her opinion on any particular product. The site itself should try to post material based on it's usefulness for the general public rather than personal preferences (and I believe it does). The editor on the other hand can and should voice his comments on the material being posted. They are at least as interesting as those of the other posters.

    Gal
  8. Hello![ Go to top ]

    I'm guessing from your message George you don't use intelliJ. Perhaps if you did you might understand why TSS are so keen to write about version 4.0 being released. There are an awful lot of Java sites that try and promote / report upon all software equally - and they don't tend to get excited when excellent software is released.

    I personally find it quite refreshing when a popular site like TSS, reports on good software with a sense of excitement - why shouldn't it be promoted? The guys who developed it put an awful lot of time into it, and as it's good software, probably deserve a favourable mention or two...
  9. Hello![ Go to top ]

    Hello everybody,

    Well, first of all, I use JBuilder because it works for me. I had to use technologies like Java, Swing, Corba, SOAP (Apache Axis), Cocoon, Aspectj, Application Servers and Web servers.

    And I had to use some of these technologies since 1999, my current project has about 300 Entity beans (I know how to use Entity Beans) serving every interface possible out there. And, again, I'm using JBuilder because it keeps on working for me.

    Its good to see Intellij thrive in a market when Microsoft, IBM, Oracle and SUN are all subsidizing IDEs.

    Now, do I use Borland tools because of some kind of blind loyalty, no! Borland just keeps winning my votes in every release. Of course, I continuously survey other IDEs to make sure I stay in the game. To date, given the last five years of my work, no other IDE comes close "for me".

    I hope Borland and JetBrains doesn't get gobbled up and become just another subsidized offering.

    Hi Stuart,

    >>"I personally find it quite refreshing when a popular site like TSS, reports on good software with a sense of excitement - why shouldn't it be promoted? The guys who developed it put an awful lot of time into it, and as it's good software, probably deserve a favourable mention or two... "

    A popular site like TSS should promote open views into the world of enterprise Java, not personal message like what Dion did. We are all biased, we can't help that, but TheServerSide endorsed a product, so the information content on this site is not good "for me"...
  10. Good bye[ Go to top ]

    George-

    I came to The Middleware Company because there is something special here. TMC has the opportunity to connect with developers around the world and that's worth being a part of.

    Regarding your comments about "endorsement." -- I'd like to give you some perspective on editorial methodologies.

    First, Dion is an excellent editor and we've received many acclaims over the past couple months over improved content. I've noticed it and attribute that success directly to Dion.

    Second, what Dion did in his news post was merely disclosue. Dion put the comments as an editor's note and indicated that we use it here. He also said that he was looking forward to the new features, which is true because we look forward to the new features of all of the tools.

    Third, an endorsement (such as what papers do for politicians) is to make a claim, usually associated with an editorial column, that the company, the magazine, and its publishing muscle "recommend, encourage and stand behind" the item being endorsed.

    Fourth, an opinion is an article, column or other piece located in the magazine that states the company's, magazine's, or author's opinion on a topic, but is usually preceded by a disclaimer indicating that the opinion is just that (and nothing else should be inferred from it).

    TSS has never made an endorsement and sometimes elicits opinions. We do a lot of disclosure.

    Tyler Jewell
    The Middleware Company
  11. Good bye[ Go to top ]

    Hey Buddy,
        Why don't you ask serverside to use BEA workshop????.
  12. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    Not wanting to start a flame but I have to ask all the users of those IDEs (IntelliJ, JBuilder, ...):

    Why should someone *not* use Eclipse or NetBeans to build her/his server-sided Java application? In combination with Ant, I see no need for other IDEs especially for the server-side Java applications.

    Just curious...

    Cheers,
    Lofi.
  13. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    Because they're not as good?

    Cheers

    Tom
  14. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    +1
  15. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    Dear Lofi,

    Nobody said that one shouldn't use a free product to build a server-side application ...
    One answer can be that, most of the time, you simply don't have the choice ! I work for a company which has chosen to use JBuilder as its Java IDE. As this is a company-wide choice, no other tool is officially supported - and of course you won't get the budget to buy something else, and not even the admin right to install something else.
    Also, beeing free doesn't make a product better.
    As a personal choice, I use IntelliJ. Although I agree that Eclipse is not a bad tool, I still think that IntelliJ is best suited to my style of programming. I could start to enumerate all the features I love in IntelliJ, but the most important is that I feel good and productive using it.
    As we say in french, "Les gouts et les couleurs, ca ne se discute pas" :-)

    Cheers,
    Sebastien.

    http://www.jroller.com/page/spetrucci
  16. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    Sebastian,

    I use JBuilder because of all the stuff thats bundled with it and it "works" out of the Box. I dont "really" want to write ant scripts, download plugins (the last EJB plugin I looked at a while ago was LOMBOZ. It was incomplete then and not really any good to me at the time. This could have changed though so I dunno), etc. Id rather just have a wizard that does all that stuff for you and actually DO my job, i.e. code java business logic. Agreed you have to pay money for this luxury (and in the case of JBuilder this is top $) but IMHO I think its worth it in the end (if the company can afford it, etc).

    Just my 2 pence...

    Cheers,

    Smythe...
  17. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    Sorry Sebastien ... meant to direct my earlier post at Lofi ;-)

    Cheers

    Smythe
  18. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    I downloaded IDEA 4.0 and I was quite impressed. They have added features that were most missed - GUI build tool, WEBLogic support, better J2EE support and JDK 1.5.

    It's interesting that they support only WEBLogic....

    anyway It's sad that we don't use IDEA at our company.

    Maris
  19. Many reasons why we use IntelliJ[ Go to top ]

    Hi,

    Money (not paying for what you use) is not the only consideration when picking a product.

    In large part the world has moved on from simply making purchasing decisions based on how little (if anything) we hand over. If that was the case then the world would not be (increasingly) populated with expensive coffee bars, ;-).

    If you want to understand how normal human beings behave in this day and age please read the following books:

    The Substance of Style: How the Rise of Aesthetic Value Is Remaking Commerce, Culture, and Consciousness - ISBN: 0060186321
    Emotional Design: Why We Love (Or Hate) Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman - ISBN: 0465051359

    I am not sure whether the guys at JetBrains have deliberately built the product around these concepts but it is clear from the intelligence of the product, attention to detail, interaction flow, color scheme, layout, that they are well aware of emotion in the design of tools.

    "Develop with Pleasure" says so much about the product and the feeling one has when writing code in it.

    Another book which highlights the problems that tools such as JBuilder X has acquired overtime (every 6 months) is "Designing from Both Sides of the Screen: How Designers and Engineers Can Collaborate to Build Cooperative Technology".

    Regards,

    William
    JDBInsight Product Architect

    "Tune and Test with Insight"
    http://www.jinspired.com
  20. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    Nice to see that there is still a market place for IntelliJ...

    Seeing something like this (below) I would say... the time will come that Eclipse will rule the J2EE development:

    "IBM will contribute a complete set of basic J2EE and Web tools to the eclipse Web Tools Platform project. The contributed tools are the results of significant development effort over several years within the context of the IBM WebSphere Studio product family. These tools are immediately useful in themselves but also provide a framework that runtime vendors and tools developers can extend in the future. These tools will make a significant contributition to the completeness and appeal of the eclipse platform and will help build a thriving J2EE developer community around eclipse. "

    More info with nice screenshots:
    http://www.cs.huji.ac.il/~dar/wdt/ibm.html

    Cheers,
    Lofi.
  21. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    Nice to see that there is still a market place for IntelliJ...


    It all depends on us whether IntelliJ remains in the market or not. I would definitely miss these guys, since they really understood what usability means. They started with a JBuilder Plugin and created Idea ... hope the VS.NET #C plugin isn't a first sign ...

    However Eclipse, the platform, is indeed a pretty good marketing move. Sooner or later it will dominate the whole IDE market beyond Java and J2EE.
  22. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    They started with a JBuilder Plugin and created Idea ... hope the VS.NET #C >plugin isn't a first sign ...

    I'd actually love IntelliJ to release IDEA for C#. That is, unless MS decided to buy it from them/buy them
    >
    > However Eclipse, the platform, is indeed a pretty good marketing move. >Sooner or later it will dominate the whole IDE market beyond Java and J2EE.
    Eclipse suffers (at least it did when I last time looked at it) from (un)usability. That's not to say it doesn't have the features, but that to access some of them is quite hard (no custom keybindings till 2.1, no keybindings for things like refactoring till 2.1 etc - at least I think it was 2.1) and the whole metaphor is not what most people are used to and happy to work with. Sometime I want to work with something small and don't care about all the other projects I've ever had on my PC!
    Again, it might have changed since I saw Eclipse last time, but in my experience IBM's tends to create their own GUI metaphors and in my experience (Lotus, VisualAge) it didn't work that well most of the time.
    Regards,
    Vlad
  23. IDEs for ServerSide Java[ Go to top ]

    I'd actually love IntelliJ to release IDEA for C#. That is, unless MS decided to buy it

    > from them/buy them

    They said they will no go this direction because it is "too hard" to do what they need to do in a different language ("understand" C# in Java, so to say)

    > Eclipse suffers (at least it did when I last time looked at it) from (un)usability.

    It doesn't matter in the long run. Look, everyone is using Jakarta projects, and quality can't be the reason for that decision.
  24. IntelliJ IDEA 4.0 released[ Go to top ]

    J2SDK 1.5 support

    nope. they dont.. although they
    already support generics.

    lofi: coz they are not as good as IDEA.
  25. IntelliJ IDEA 4.0 released - Excellent[ Go to top ]

    This is the best value for money you'll ever get. If time is money then it's definately better value than Eclipse of NetBeans.

    You really have to see this IDE to understand how powerful it actually is, this runs rings around Microsoft efforts and is a lot more user-friendly than the others in the field.

    Our company have used IDEA for years now and I've been using the "early access" 4.0 for several months.

    Very highly recommended!

    -John-
  26. IntelliJ IDEA 4.0 released[ Go to top ]

    Some of the new features in IDEA 4.0 are catch-up with other IDEs that already support them.
    For example, Web Logic integration, Visual Designer, HotSwap debugging and more are already present in JBuilder (some of them 'for ages').

    So IDEA is now playing catch-up in features that were lacking in IDEA and present in other IDEs.

    Mileta
  27. Who's catching-up who?[ Go to top ]

    So IDEA is now playing catch-up in features that

    > were lacking in IDEA and present in other IDEs.

    Viceversa.
  28. I was here first[ Go to top ]

    Hi Mileta,

    I think JBuilder had a Java editor before IntelliJ was on the scene, ;-). So.

    What IntelliJ initially added was a refactoring tool that enhanced the product. Does it matter who was first especially since JBuilder in recent releases has been playing catch up itself with IDEA.

    The important point is that when the IntelliJ (JetBrains) team does release a feature it works and it fits within the workflow. This is ensured through the great EA program that is run and the speed of EA builds.

    JBuilder on the contary releases something that kinda works and then waits for people to give out before trying again in the next release which you must pay for. I should know, I worked at Borland long enough. I don't know what happened to the JB team and the product vision but somewhere along the way they forgot about the Borland heritage and stopped innovating and instead copying others and packaging open source tools.

    Regards,

    William Louth
    JDBInsight Product Architect

    "Tune and Test with Insight"
    http://www.jinspired.com
  29. I have been a Textpad/Ant developer for years. I cut my teeth on JBuilder 2 back in college, and I don't think I have used an IDE since. I've tried using Netbeans and newer versions of JBuilder, but it always feels like I am doing all this extra stuff to write a simple program.

    I bought IDEA at the christmas special price, and all I can say is WOW! The intelligence of this tool is amazing. Everything just works the way you would expect it to.

    On a side note, my company is considering moving to Subversion. I know IDEA has a Subversion plugin, but I can't tell if that means you lose all the fancy CVS integration features in 4.0. Can anyone share their experiences with VCS support in IDEA. Does the interface change depending on which VCS you are using?

    thanks,

    Ryan
  30. my company is considering moving to Subversion.

    > I know IDEA has a Subversion plugin, but I can't
    > tell if that means you lose all the fancy CVS
    > integration features in 4.0. Can anyone share
    > their experiences with VCS support in IDEA

    All I can say is that svn-plugin does not work with 4.0. Subversion project is going to release version 1.0 on Monday, 23 Feb 2004. I hope that they can then continue improving svnup-project. I miss the CVS features in IDEA, but I like Subversion even more. I'm quite happy with command line svn tool. Some of my co-workers use tortoisesvn.
  31. My $0.02[ Go to top ]

    Well, I've just paid my upgrade fee ... IDEA is certainly the best Java IDE that I have used and I don't begrudge spending the money (out of my own pocket, I hasten to add) even though I could have used a free tool.

    I've used Eclipse briefly and objectively speaking it had everything that I need, but I find IDEA to be a much better overall experience and I feel far more productive in IDEA.

    Cheers,

    Andy Grove
    [blog]
  32. IntelliJ IDEA 4.0 released[ Go to top ]

    I feel obligated to give IntelliJ a plug, also. I have had the privelege of working with may ide's over the years. JBuilder, Eclipse, Visual Age for Java, etc and many of them have/had their qualities. I can say, however, that once I tried IntelliJ, I have not even considered another ide. I do check out eclipse once in a while to see where it stands, but I still don't think there is anything out there thats even in the ballpark with IntelliJ right now. I'm more than happy to pay the licensing fees for such a good products. I use jboss, tomcat, and apache daily. I use them because they are excellent products more so than their price. If I found another app server out there that I thought was head and shoulders above Jboss enough to pay a licensing fee for, I wouldn't hesitate to use it. Same thing with tomcat and apache. I like that they are all free, but it certainly isn't my deciding factor. The same holds true for the Intellij and all the other java ide's on the market now. I wouldn't mind a free ide, but I feel Intellij is so much more intuitive, friendly, powerful, etc that I feel its a bargain in paying the license fees.

    Just my .02
  33. GUI Designer comment[ Go to top ]

    I use to be a VIM user, until I met IDEA, the reason was very simple, every time I evaluate an IDE I had to do more work just to set it up than actually writing code, and if I use it for a little while always spend time trying to figure out where the .class and .java file were :P.
       Anyway, IDEA changed this for me, my classes, my sources and everything I got was there where I want it to be, and the IDE has always do the work for me and not the other way around. I still can edit quickly a file using VIM and the local history of IDEA label it as an external change, very cool.
       I wondered how the GUI support would be for such a good tool, I've tried JBuilder before and what I liked most the clean code it produces compared with other IDE's. After the code generation I still modify the gui code by hand until I was satisfied, and I was hoping that the new intellj gui support come to change this in the way it did with non gui code.
       Unfortunately this was not the case, I am a little disappointed, the new GUI support uses an external file .form that is an XML where the properties and bindings specified in the GUI editor are saved, and in a "magic" way are invoked when the bounded class is invoked. The .class files are written to the output directory so they can be loaded at run time and there's an option to generate this code into the bounded class, but the code quality is terrible and I would say "anti IDEA" since is not clear and neat.
        This mechanism even though accomplish the objective of create easily a GUI, it ties my project source code to the IDE classes, and hides me the way it works, this why I've refused other IDE's before in the first place. If a share my source code with a non IDEA user, lets say another VIM die hard user It wont even compile, or the use of flags and more setting beyond the javac -d classes src/*.java command will be needed.
        I must admit it, I'll definitively use this new feature because is really easy and fast to create GUI with it, but they’ll be for personal use only , since I think that my co-workers that use some other IDE's or text editors will present some resistance to adopt it.
       I guess I will have to wait more time for the great dreamed GUI support becomes a reality. Maybe creating an ant task that parse this XML file and write the neat, clean, great code I expect will do the job...

     Yeah, rigth.!!!

     :P

    Zkr Ryz
  34. GUI builder in IDEA[ Go to top ]

    I agree with your comments on GUI builder. It generates code that uses the IDEA APIs and hence can't be used with any other IDE or vim.

    While looking for a better way to build Swing UIs, I recently came across forms API from www.jgoodies.com. It provides a layout manager that's so easy to use that I dont think one need to use a visual GUI designer.

    /t
  35. GUI Designer comment[ Go to top ]

    I agree with you. It makes it very easy for creating GUI apps but the source code generated is not very clean/neat. (you have the option to generate binary or source btw)
  36. I agree that the generated Java code by IntelliJ GUI Builder is not pretty and not suitable as basis for technical communicaiton with coworkers. But maybe that's not the point. Let's face it: nobody enjoys writing low-level UI code. Remember motif? Java has come a long way in simplfying UI developer's life, however, has the way to create UIs really changed that much? Customers like well-designed easier-to-use user interfaces, but do they really care whether that UI is generated by XML, Java or C, or the code is pretty or not? If programmers can easily create and maintain great UIs with XML files generated by IntelliJ, why should they even bother converting them into Java code as long as IntelliJ's translation mechanism works well? The software industry is always evolving to make programmers' job easier not harder, and to make them concentrate on things that really matter, such as UI usability and the accurate capture of customer's requirements. IDEA realized that writing UI Java code is just a plumbing job and it has taken a step in the right direction with their GUI Builder. It allows UI designers to spend their precious time on the actual "designing" of a UI, not the boring work of implementing the design. I don't know about you, but I prefer to be the architect of a great building or bridge instead of the one that actually lays the bricks day and night.

    XML files instead of some proprietary hard-to-parse format is another plus. If you insist on having Java code and absolutely hate IntelliJ-generated version, you can always go ahead and implement your own code generator based on the syntax of their XML files. Hey that's a much better challenge to us programmers than writing "Button okButton = new Button("OK");" as our careers.
  37. Why I don't use IntelliJ IDEA[ Go to top ]

    I have evaluated IDEA for myself since I am able to pick up my own toolset. However, there are a couple (not many) features that I sorely miss compared to Eclipse and just can't live without.

       
    • A database plugin similar to DBEdit

    •  
    • Better integrated JUnit support, not just launching the TextRunner or the SwingRunner

    •  
    • Better integrated Ant support


    While I can see myself developing with IDEA my preference is still with Eclipse although IDEA is not far behind. That being said I can only use Eclipse coupled with MyEclipseIDE and a number of auxilliary plugins. Without it it's quite incomplete.
  38. Why I don't use IntelliJ IDEA[ Go to top ]

    I have evaluated IDEA for myself since I am able to pick up my own toolset. However, there are a couple (not many) features that I sorely miss compared to Eclipse and just can't live without.

    >
  39. Eclipse has better ANT support!??[ Go to top ]

    ...I'm afraid not. ANT is a first class citizen in IDEA. It can even assign custom keymappings to ant targets. If there's anything you do often, assign a key and work faster than you ever have.

    There is also an excellent SQL plugin you can run like any other tool window in IDEA including key mappings. Also includes multiple DB configurations, and other features.

    JUnit now has tighter integration too.

    It also has far better file control in CVS histories etc etc.


    It's just the sweetest IDE there is.


    Arron.
  40. Its pain me to say this but IMHO I think the IntelliJ team have dropped the ball on this one.
    I love IDEA v3 but I hate IDEA v4.

    v4 now has all the features that I loath about JBuilder (JBuilder's diseases). v4 is more complex, its less intuitive & its harder to use. Most of the new features actually get in my way !

    Time to roll back the version label, refocus on the professional audience, stop watching JBuilder & innovate; like I know they can.

    I am going back to version 3.

    :-(

    --------------------
    Stebbo

    Software Engineer
    Australia.
    --------------------
  41. Time for a reality check. IDEA V4 is better than V3.

    *its still highly intutive
    *has more features
    *expands on existing features

    back up your statements with some examples instead of vaguely dissing it. what jbuilder diseases have contaminated it? what gets in your way?

    <stebbo> Its pain me to say this but IMHO I think the IntelliJ team have dropped the ball on this one.
    I love IDEA v3 but I hate IDEA v4.

    v4 now has all the features that I loath about JBuilder (JBuilder's diseases). v4 is more complex, its less intuitive & its harder to use. Most of the new features actually get in my way !

    Time to roll back the version label, refocus on the professional audience, stop watching JBuilder & innovate; like I know they can.

    I am going back to version 3.

    :-
    </stebbo>
  42. Here is my reality:
    * I do develop enterprise apps for a large corporation.
      - they are exploded
      - they contain 1->M EJB jars
      - they contain 1->M exploded web apps
      - some of them put jars on the server's classpath
    * I do use Weblogic.
      - a local server
      - a dev server
      - a test server
      - and a prod server
      - I do not have write permissions to the test/prod servers. re: Change Control.
      - dev, test & prod are clustered environments
    * I do build with a different JDK.
    * I use IDEA, but the other developer's don't. We all do work on the same projects.
    * We all use PVCS for version management.

    Each project is built with ANT. Therefore I have no interest in using the IDE to make, build, or deploy anything. Those features get in my way. btw: the ANT tool window is superb.

    I deal with clustered environments, non clustered environments, local & remote servers. Each requires a different sequence of steps for a successful deployment. I am comfortable with the admin console. Therefore I have no interest in trying to control any app servers from within my IDE. I wish I could make the v4 deployment view go away. That feature gets in my way.

    I use the EJB tool window & the web app tool window in v3. I found them intuitive, quick to setup & easy to use. They even handled multiple web apps & EJB groups when I needed them. The new concept of modules in v4 sounds cool on paper but when it comes to the crunch I found that I spent more time configuring them than actually using them. Moving the old EJB & web app tool windows into the project as another view also slows me down. Please god make them tool windows again !

    I understand the xml files involved in a J2EE app. Therefore I don't need my IDE to wrap an editor over them. Especially when those files are usually read-only (haven't been checked out of VC) so the editor chucks a whammy when I change a property. Having a strange editor open up in my usual document space is unsettling too. That feature gets in my way. The ability to specify & refactor the <xxx-name> attributes is cool though !

    I understand the components of a J2EE app. I don't like the EJB wizards in v4 because I have to say I want to create an EJB, and then choose the type, then enter my details. The EJB dialogs of v3 were much quicker.

    I loath JBuilder because it has a billion config options all maintained by an equivalent amount of dialog boxes. Its chock full of wizards and features I don't need; and it all gets in my way. These are the diseases I talk about & these are now a part of IDEA v4.

    v3 was slick & powerful. v4 is a config overload. A real shame too.

    Stebbo.
  43. Favourite Java IDE[ Go to top ]

    Never ask a Java developer what their preferred IDE is. If it's IDEA, then they'll already know about it ... if not, you'll only embarrass them.

    So far, I have converted 9 out of the 9 developers I have showed IDEA to after getting them to use it on a new project for just 2 months. Although I can see the cost making IDEA out of some people's reach, I cant see why people would see it being TOO flexable as being a problem.

    In any case - I respect other's opinions but I do suggest, to those who haven't already, give IDEA a chance and try to work WITH it rather than IN it. You never know you may be pleasantly surprised!

    NOTE: I have spent months working with other IDE's (NetBeans, Eclipse, JEdit, JBuilder to name a few) and havent found anything with such attention to detail and care of the developer and his/her way of coding.
  44. Favourite Java IDE - IDEA[ Go to top ]

    havent found anything with such attention to detail and care of the developer >and his/her way of coding.


    that's why developers love IDEA.