Maven 1.0 RC2 released

Discussions

News: Maven 1.0 RC2 released

  1. Maven 1.0 RC2 released (19 messages)

    The Apache Maven team is pleased to announce the release of Maven 1.0 RC2.

    Maven is a Java project management and project comprehension tool. Maven is based on the concept of a project object model (POM). The intent of Maven is to make intra-project development highly manageable in the hopes of providing more time for cross-project development.

    RC2 is a release candidate for Maven 1.0. The main focus for this release was
    - Remove a memory leak in long-lived and multiple project builds
    - Reworking the internals for more maintainability while retaining full backwards compatibility with RC1.
    - Many other bugfixes

    For a complete list of changes in the Maven core, see JIRA:
    http://jira.codehaus.org/secure/IssueNavigator.jspa?reset=true&pid=10030&fixfor=10245

    While no new features have been added to Maven's central architecture, RC2 includes all the latest releases of the plugins developed at Apache. Most plugins include bugfixes and new functionality since the RC1 release.

    In addition, the following plugins have been added to the release:
    - announcement: generates templated release announcements for a project
    - aspectwerkz: Aspectwerkz integration
    - caller: A goal interface for Maven plugins
    - dashboard: A report plugin that aggregates reports from multiple projects
    - javacc: generates code based on user-supplied Javacc/JJtree grammars
    - jdiff: generates an api difference report between versions
    - jetty: Jetty integration
    - jira: generates a Maven report from JIRA
    - multichanges: A report plugin that aggregates changes reports from multiple projects
    - nsis: generates a Windows Installer for your project using the Nullsoft Installer System

    The following plugins have had major upgrades since the last release:
    - pdf: a complete rewrite now produces a much better PDF representation of your project site.
    - xdoc: Maven site's now have a new default look-and-feel and are more customisable

    For changes made to individual plugins since the last release, you can review the release history at JIRA.

    Download Maven at: http://maven.apache.org/start/download.html

    The following plugins are no longer distributed with Maven and must be downloaded from an external source:
    - cactus: download instructions at
    http://jakarta.apache.org/cactus/integration/maven/index.html
    - word2html, was40: download from
    http://maven-plugins.sf.net

    We hope you enjoy using Maven! If you have any questions, please consult:
    - the FAQ: http://maven.apache.org/faq.html
    - the Wiki: http://wiki.codehaus.org/maven/
    - the maven-user mailing list: http://maven.apache.org/mail-lists.html

    For news and information, see:
    - Maven Blogs: http://www.mavenblogs.com/

    - The Apache Maven Team

    Threaded Messages (19)

  2. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Quick! Tell HANI!!!
  3. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Since when did TSS accept postings about release candidates? In the past, they've only accepted postings about final releases.
  4. Everyone hates maven. tss likes lively long flamewars. Hence, plenty of maven related posts just to get people riled up and posting about how crap it is. Don't rise to the bait, and just ignore everything maven related!
  5. Maven is an exception because....[ Go to top ]

    Everyone hates maven. tss likes lively long flamewars. Hence, plenty of maven related posts just to get people riled up and posting about how crap it is. Don't rise to the bait, and just ignore everything maven related!
    Maven is great, you've obviously either not progressed to a project large enough to use it or you've not take the time to understand what it can do for you. I suppose you prefer Borland's JBuilder of something?

    That should start a flame war. :-)

    -John- (great fan of Maven)
  6. How exactly does Maven help with large projects? Maven prescribes a fairly basic tool layout and then lays on extra stuff like developer info and mailing lists. Is it the pretty reports you like?

    The actual build and test portions of a Maven project aren't exactly that sophisticated compared to Ant. The dependency/repository thing might be nice to some people, but most large projects I've seen check their tool dependencies into revision control anyways, so it's not exactly hard to keep things in sync.

    Maven looks pretty and cuts out a lot of effort in setting up reporting scripts, but I fail to see how it in any way contributes to managing the source code for a large and complicated project. Real world large scale development can't be adequately described by a few lines in an XML file.
  7. Having recently just moved a fairly large multi-module project to maven I would have to say that for the majority of things you can describe them with a few lines in an XML file. Our project is using a whole range of features including AspectJ, Hibernate, EJB (Session Beans/MDB), Web apps, JUnit and Cactus tests etc. and I havn't found anything that I haven't been able to set maven up to do quickly (once you have found and understood the necessary plugin) and easily.

    If there is a downside to maven I would say it is the poor documentation for many of the plugins and the way it feels so unintuitive when you start using it. I'm not sure I even understand all the ins and outs of how it is achieving our project builds. What I do know is that the builds are working great and I have save tens of hours of ant build file coding along the way!
  8. Having recently just moved a fairly large multi-module project to maven I would have to say that for the majority of things you can describe them with a few lines in an XML file. Our project is using a whole range of features including AspectJ, Hibernate, EJB (Session Beans/MDB), Web apps, JUnit and Cactus tests etc. and I havn't found anything that I haven't been able to set maven up to do quickly (once you have found and understood the necessary plugin) and easily.If there is a downside to maven I would say it is the poor documentation for many of the plugins and the way it feels so unintuitive when you start using it. I'm not sure I even understand all the ins and outs of how it is achieving our project builds. What I do know is that the builds are working great and I have save tens of hours of ant build file coding along the way!
    I originally got excited about and started playing with Maven around a year and a half ago.

    The problem is that the focus of development has always been completely screwed up. The plugins to generate documentation and the like are admittedly useful, but considering that small individual projects are very easy to set up with Ant, the biggest value-add (IMHO) would have been for Maven to make multi (related) project development easier, in terms of automation and dependency handling. But while people putzed around endlessly with many dozens of plugins of dubious value, Maven remained basically useless for multi-project builds, due to bugs in memory consumption, weak or buggy project/build property inheritance and overrides, buggy repo override implementation, and of course the biggy, the fact that if project X uses project Y which uses project Z, project X has to itself know about dependencies of those other projects, in terms of pulling libraries in to produce a build with all dependencies included.

    After all this time (and hard work by some people the last few months to remove bugs) it looks like most of the issues mentioned above are resolved, with the exception of the dependency on. Until that is taken care of, I still consider it somewhat useless for multi-project builds. Everybody's milage will vary of course... (in the meantime, for building multi-project apps, I use a system of standardized build files which include a master definition for almost all tasks, and all projects list their own dependencies in term terms of compiling, testing, runtime, etc., whcih are automatically used by othe projects).
  9. Gee, "everybody" must not include me and all the folks I work with as we are using Maven and are much happier than what we had to do before we started using it.

    Looks to me like your statement should read "Don't rise to the bait, and just ignore everything Hani related!"
  10. I really don't like Maven either. Big projects can be also seperated though different ant-files and includes. In Maven the structure is completely unclear - and everything special has to be an ant-task as well - so why bother with maven?
  11. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Since when did TSS accept postings about release candidates? In the past, they've only accepted postings about final releases.
    If we waited for final then we'd see nothing for years. It's posting like this that get people to use it so that it can get to final faster.

    -John-
  12. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Since when did TSS accept postings about release candidates? In the past, they've only accepted postings about final releases.
    If we waited for final then we'd see nothing for years. It's posting like this that get people to use it so that it can get to final faster.-John-
    The same can be said for any project. I'm a little miffed that Maven is being treated specially. Perhaps I'll post a Tapestry 3.0-rc-1 announcement and see if that is picked up.
  13. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Perhaps I'll post a Tapestry 3.0-rc-1 announcement and see if that is picked up.
    You mean like:

    Tapestry Release 0.1.4

    ;-)
  14. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Perhaps I'll post a Tapestry 3.0-rc-1 announcement and see if that is picked up.
    You mean like:Tapestry Release 0.1.4;-)
    ... and at the time, I was told that TSS only accepts initial announcments, and then GA releases. I didn't like this, since I thought and initial beta announcement was a reasonable thing. Again, the TSS crew must have changed thier mind ... we'll see if they allow an announcement for Maven 1.0 final.
  15. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Howard, they did announce the RC1 release of Tapestry. It was buried in with some other stuff, but I noticed it:

    http://www.theserverside.com/news/thread.tss?thread_id=24580
  16. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Must have missed that while I was recovering.
  17. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Sorry if I've offended anyone for posting an RC, but I was going on the fact that RC1 was also announced here by Dion:
    http://theserverside.com/news/thread.tss?thread_id=21655

    A search for release candidate here gives lots of results - tapestry, Struts, JBoss, etc.

    Anyway, I'll honour the unwritten rule in the future.
  18. Maven 1.0 RC2 released[ Go to top ]

    Since when did TSS accept postings about release candidates? In the past, they've only accepted postings about final releases.
    It is more meaningfull to post about release candidates than final releases,
    it helps for final release quality.
  19. Java goal missing ?[ Go to top ]

    I must've been playing with .Net too much. I can't seem to find [java] goal in Maven RC2. I did 'maven -g' and it's not there. Is it in a separate download now or it's too early in the morning and I need a cold one ? :)
  20. Maven 1.0.2[ Go to top ]

    Hallo Everybody,


    I would like to know a few things about Maven 1.0.2 n its integration into java.

    How can maven be started from Java? Are there examples how to integrate maven into java applications? i.e, do we have any APIs so that we call Maven from a java program etc to generate the nightly reports.


    Can we stop maven from not downloading the plugins during a goal completion.
    Since we need to integrate into a product, where it can be a local
    Installation without an internet connection.

    Shall be thankful for any ideas / suggestions.Thanks.

    Sreenivas.