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News: Mike Spille launches TSS Blogger Program with Groovy Article

  1. TheServerSide is launching a Blogger Program that aims to get great blog content out to as many people as possible. Mike Spille has written the first piece to become a featured article in the Blogger Program. Mike has written an interesting, deep look into the Groovy scripting language.

    Featured Article Excerpt
    I've decided that I've been chugging along with Java/C/C++/perl for far too long. I'm stagnating, and I need to go out and learn something new. As much as I enjoy coding in Java, constant contact with it has dulled my enthusiasm and hardened too many neural pathways for it to really be fun anymore. I was doing C as a friggin' teenager, C++ is giving me ulcers, and perl - well, you know about perl. So it's high time I get off my bum and learn something new.

    That leaves Groovy. Based on extensive past experience in encountering and learning new things, I was fully prepared to be wildly disappointed. In the real world the stars of the show seem to never live up to their billing. The handsome lead looks fabulous in his stage makeup, but after the show you find that the makeup was covering 37 zits; he's really 5'2"; his last bath was probably in the Nixon era; he was wearing a girdle to hold in his 48-inch belly; and he's got bits of chunky bacon stuck in his teeth. There's a lot of people out there making alot of fancy talk, painting a pretty picture to give the illusion of their hero being a a virile leading man. But almost always it's all smoke and mirrors, it's a coverup aimed at making a smelly short fat man with bad complexion look good.

    In Groovy's case, I was pleasantly surprised.
    Read our first featured article Groovy: First Contact

    To read more about the Blogger Program and how you can join, visit What is the TSS Blogger Program?

    Threaded Messages (7)

  2. Great idea[ Go to top ]

    Great idea, Dion. I am sure many will find it useful.

    A link on the top-left menu to the Blogger item page would be very helpful.
  3. Not bad, well rounded and presented. I think the concerns Mike has made about Groovy have been echoed elsewhere also; the biggest one is optionality, definitely.

    I beg to differ over operator overloading myself but certainly a good article.

    More please!
  4. Support for interactive use[ Go to top ]

    One of the things that I didn't like about groovy is that the groovy shell requires you to type "go"/"execute" to run the statements entered interactively. This is inconvenient for quick experimentation, developing linemode interactive programs or simply running groovyshell as a replacement for a shell program like 'bash'.

    I would very much like it to execute a _completed statement_ after the user hits ENTER.
  5. Support for interactive use[ Go to top ]

    One of the things that I didn't like about groovy is that the groovy shell requires you to type "go"/"execute" to run the statements entered interactively. This is inconvenient for quick experimentation, developing linemode interactive programs or simply running groovyshell as a replacement for a shell program like 'bash'. I would very much like it to execute a _completed statement_ after the user hits ENTER.
    BeanShell, http://beanshell.org/
  6. Support for interactive use[ Go to top ]

    Bob suggested beanshell in response to my earlier comment on lack of interactive commands in groovy shell.

    I am a heavy user of beanshell. Though its java-like syntax feels awkward for one-line commands. Groovy syntax appears to be much more suited for such tasks. Also, adding the support for interactive commands in Groovy shell should be fairly easy.
  7. Support for interactive use[ Go to top ]

    The shell is pretty awkward. I find it alot easier to edit scripts in a text editor and just 'groovy' them e.g.

        groovy test_stuff.groovy

    The shell is just too clunky to do anything expressive. The Swing shell is a bit easier to use, but the 'groovy' command is fast enough on my PC that it makes using either of the shells seem silly.

        -Mike
  8. Remoting Groovy[ Go to top ]

    What would it take to be able to remote groovy?

    My day to day problem in a multi-platform environment where we want to do some common operation on lots of machines is that we are writing multiple versions of scripts, because each platform has it's own authentication mechanisms. It would be beautiful if groovy in some way could abstract that.

    Would require platform specific code, but it would help fulfill the promise of java's platform independance.

    Thoughts?

    /Staffan