IBM releases Java processor for mainframes

Discussions

News: IBM releases Java processor for mainframes

  1. IBM releases Java processor for mainframes (7 messages)

    IBM has created a module to handle Java for its mainframe computers. "The zSeries Application Assist Processor (zAAP) is essentially a dedicated processor for Java applications. Java runs on IBM mainframes now but has not had dedicated hardware. The zAAP costs $125,000 per microprocessor."

    Read more: IBM dedicates module to Java on mainframes, New IBM zSeries 890 Midrange Mainframe Has Java Engines

    Threaded Messages (7)

  2. If its so cheap I want to buy 5 of them for the whole family!
  3. The end of OS/HW independence[ Go to top ]

    I remember Sun doing similar things (making Java-specific hardware) in the early days of Java, with their JavaStations. It's a logical thing to do for a hardware vendor, but doesn't it contradict the entire "OS/HW independent" philosophy behind Java? How dangerous is this to Java's unified, and OS/HW independent future? Events like these make me fear the fact Java's unified future may not survive, as there are bigger (hardware-related) things at stake here...
  4. It's a logical thing to do for a hardware vendor, but doesn't it contradict the entire "OS/HW independent" philosophy behind Java? How dangerous is this to Java's unified, and OS/HW independent future?
    It's effectively no different than implementing a Java Virtual Machine (JVM). The Java platform architecture supports (and encourages) multiple, different JVM implementations optimized for particular operating environments. As long as the JVM implementation complies with the specification of what a JVM is supposed to do, there's no issue with platform independence or compatibility. You can still take any Java program, compile it with any Java compiler and run the resulting bytecodes on any JVM -- including ones that may be implemented in hardware.

    Randy Schnier
  5. Java processor[ Go to top ]

    As I know this Java processor of the zSeries is just a regular zSeries processor. Just the pricing is different. Normally you have to pay a lot more license fees if you take an additional processor. As the Java processor just runs Java instructions and can't run IMS, CICS etc, this extra power for Java/WebSphere doesn't cost you so much (125.000$ are peanuts in the mainframe world :-)).

    IBM has had or maybe does still have a similar processor pricing for Linux in zSeries were you pay a lot less for the processor power if you run Linux e.g. for running Apache Webserver.

    Mirko
  6. Good for Java[ Go to top ]

    If anything, this would help Java continue to live and grow, given the power and market share of Mainframes. I have been involved in developing enterprise Java apps that were eventually deployed on z/OS and this would be a great news to many of those large organizations that are hardcore IBM houses. Assuming Java apps perform better on the new hardware, Java will become more viable platform for mainframes as well.
    Of course as pointed out by one of the previous replies, this doesnot take anything away from Java.... which includes Write Once Run Anywhere.
  7. Java Processor[ Go to top ]

    IBM has created a module to handle Java for its mainframe computers..... The zAAP costs $125,000 per microprocessor.
    I would prefere a smaller Java Processor like this one: JOP that can be implemented in an FPGA. Three of these processors fit in a $10 FPGA. That would make 37500 processors for the same money! That would be a nice Java Server.
  8. there is a great deal of difference between enterprise technology and university research!!...and thats key to understanding everytihng from price to technology when comparing JoP and IBM java processors for enterprise mainframes. And I agree that 125K is no big deal to most companies if it provides a significant performance boost or offloading.