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Web tier: servlets, JSP, Web frameworks: Java IDEs -- JBuilder X or NetBeans

  1. Java IDEs -- JBuilder X or NetBeans (10 messages)

    We have been using JBuilder since version 4. The last version we bought was JBuilder 8 enterprise edition and paid money for 21 licences. However, I have tried NetBeans 3.6 and found many nice features and I ma thinking of just using NetBeans instead of paying $$ for JBuilder X.

    I would appreciate any usefull feedback regarding market share for NetBeans. Why would anyone pay for JBuilder X Developer/Enterprise if NetBeans is available for free with almost all capabilities as JBuilder X.

    Thanks

    A Alqtn

    Threaded Messages (10)

  2. Java IDEs -- JBuilder X or NetBeans[ Go to top ]

    I know of a number organizations that have abandonned JBuilder in favor of Eclipse or NetBeans (mostly for Eclipses, actually).

    If you really want a commercial IDE, most people I know consider IDEA to be the best of breed.
  3. Why IDEA and not NetBeans[ Go to top ]

    I want to know why IDEA? There must be a big factor to pay for IDEA and not use a free full fledge IDE such as NetBeans or Eclipse. From the simple usage of NetBeans I can see it could replace JBuidler for our purpose.

    Thanks

    Alqtn
  4. Why IDEA and not NetBeans[ Go to top ]

    I want to know why IDEA? There must be a big factor to pay for IDEA and not use a free full fledge IDE such as NetBeans or Eclipse. From the simple usage of NetBeans I can see it could replace JBuidler for our purpose.

    Thanks

    Alqtn
  5. Why IDEA and not NetBeans[ Go to top ]

    Most of the people I know find the typical "wizard" framework of commercial IDEs more of an impediment than an aid. Personally, when I do development, I want my IDE to manage my code and not much else.

    For the other aspects of development, I want a dedicated best of breed tool (Ant, JUnit, CVS, various database management utilities, ORM tools like Hibernate). If those tools can be integrated with my IDE, even better. Both Eclipse and NetBeans are built around a "plugin" framework that allows integration with a variety of tools.

    Eclipse and IDEA are both good code management tools (syntax completion, auto-compiling, refactoring). I have spoken to several people that have used both Eclipse and IDEA, and find IDEA better. Personally, I stick with Eclipse because I am a cheap bastard.

    BTW, as a case in point, although I love Eclipse, I hate WSAD, even though it is built on top of Eclipse. The wizards in WSAD are a pain to use, and the extra overhead of maintaining all that extra junk in memory really slows down the IDE.
  6. Java IDEs -- JBuilder X or NetBeans[ Go to top ]

    Having used Netbeans and JBuilder side by side I must say I'm much more productive using JBuilder.

    That should raise some heads in your accounting department :)

    I abandoned JBuilder for Eclipse only because I couldn't afford the upgrade price when I was unemployed last year. Must say I like Eclipse enough that for the work I do I don't think I'll go back to JBuilder soon.
  7. U can even use Eclipse[ Go to top ]

    Dear friend ....

      I wann to share this info with u ..
       first i also used JBuilder 9 , but after that i downloaded and configured eclipse , which is a ideal IDE..

    for more info u can go to http://www.eclipse.org

     regards ,

     krishna kishore
  8. Is not it a matter of taste?[ Go to top ]

    I am sorry for non-productive (maybe) reply but I think there is no way you can get an answer on a question like that.

    The reason is - I think choosing the right IDE is a very personal matter. It has a lot to do with the taste, habbits and other characteristics of a person, as well as the background he comes from. I mean - it is obvious that Notepad is not the tool for Java, but when you compare very mature products like Eclipse, JBuilder, IDEA (I hate NetBeans, sorry) - you can not objectively say that one is better than the other.

    I am productive in one of them and not in others, as well as I happen to have taste for blue-eyed brunnets (quite rare, btw). There is no logical for that. But the point is - IDE is such an important part of the job - you can not "save" money on it. If your developer is productive with the very ixpensive JBuilder - I suggest you buy it, because that otherwise non-productive programmer will cost you more :)
  9. Yes, IDEs are a matter of personal preference and in an ideal world everyone would be able to use his own favourite and they'd all work seemlessly together.

    But in the real world there's corporate procurement systems, standard platforms for all with no personal preferences allowed, development streets designed around one supplier's tools, all of which more or less force developers to all use the same IDE when on the same team.
    It also makes interoperability a lot easier. If I need 5 minutes to get up to speed on someone elses machine that's time lost (of course that I loose more in lost productivity by using a tool that doesn't fit my brain is not something the beancounters can nicely measure so is ignored).

    Common tooling also enables common training, which in turn reduces cost.
    Common tooling means that (at least in the theory of the sysadmins) everyone can use each others machines easily, just store a personal profile on the main network server and all workstations are interchangable (which in turn enables flex stations which were all the rage here with large companies from a few years ago, another cost saving measure wherein they predict the percentage of people not in the office on any given day and reduce the number of workstations by that amount, forcing users to share their desk with others).
  10. Is not it a matter of taste?[ Go to top ]

    I agree that it is a matter of personal preference or sometimes to whatever you have used to. But looking to the accummolative cost, making a right decision early or correcting it is very important.


    I have however another question that could shade light to the issue. Is there any statistics that shows which Java IDE is famous or favorable among independent developers? Independent developers are not forced to use but their own chosen tool -- right?

    A Alqtn
  11. Is not it a matter of taste?[ Go to top ]

    I don't know of any formal statistics, but the Java developers I know mostly prefer Eclipse. IDEA is popular as well; most people I have spoken too feel that IDEA is better than Eclipse, but since Eclipse is free (and independents like me tend to be cheap bastards), Eclipse generally wins out.