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News: Eclipse Foundation Announces Eclipse 3.0

  1. Eclipse Foundation Announces Eclipse 3.0 (33 messages)

    Today the Eclipse Foundation pre-announced the availability of the royalty-free 3.0 release of the Eclipse Platform, adding enhancements that improve flexibility, scalability, interoperability and responsiveness. Eclipse RC 3 is available immediately and the final RC 4 is due by June 30th.
    Eclipse 3.0 is the cumulative result of 15 months of project investment by supporting members and the Eclipse community, continuing the commitment to implement open technology built upon established industry standards. Enhancements such as the following have been made to core facilities to help make Eclipse use more convenient, consistent and responsive:

    -- Enhanced the end user's 'out-of-the-box' experience

    -- Streamlined installation for functionally powerful features with reduced complexity

    -- Improved customization of menus and toolbars

    -- Added new role and experience-based approaches for managing workbench features and facilities

    -- Restructured the workbench to allow running underlying program facilities in the background in a multi-threaded environment.
    Download Eclipse and read the press release.

    Threaded Messages (33)

  2. I, for one, am excited.
  3. The BEST IDE is Eclipse[ Go to top ]

    Eclipse is the best IDE out there thanks to all the open source developers. Java rules.
  4. Excelsior Knowledge Base
  5. Thanks a lot ....[ Go to top ]

    Looking forward to the final release
  6. thanks to all that contribute to eclipse, it has really grown into a major force of an IDE. Kudos to IBM for doing this! Its so good in fact that it will probably end of being the demise of costly IDEs.

    -JP
  7. I almost hate to ask...[ Go to top ]

    I've been using Idea for quite a while now and I think that if I were to try Eclipse I'd be more than just a little biased by my extreme familiarity with the shortcut keys and UI layout of Idea. Is there anyone out there who has logged significant time with both and can say if Eclipse compares well?
  8. I almost hate to ask...[ Go to top ]

    I used both of them for long time
    Idea is going to become J2ee IDE too , but i think its far from a good j2ee
    IDE , -for eclipse there are free plugins like lomboz to make j2ee components-
    and in Standard java , eclipse perform better, IMHO

    Eclipse is great framework , and JDT is one of the best IDE.
    Eclipse 3 is comparable with IDEA in

    -Source editor
    -refactoring
    -gui builder : eclipse VE perform better than IDEA ui builder
    -open architecture ? no comment about this , its obvious
    -Eclipse is free + opensource , about 536 plugin is available for it
     from J2ee component builder to timers :-)
    ...

    To be at peace
    Masoud Kalali
  9. IDEA vs Eclipse[ Go to top ]

    I have - 2 years IDEA 2.5 -3.0.4 and now Eclipse 2.1.1 - Eclipse 3.0.
    Using Eclipse after IDEA is like adapting to Linux after you've been stuck with Windows XP. The plugin side is very powerful, and refactoring and CVS support is superb. Code highlighting is definitely not as good (i.e. compare finding matching brackets in eclipse to IDEA....!), and some things you would expect by default on Intellij need to be plugged in (e.g. XML Buddy). The Eclipse UI is not as intuitive as IDEA, but it just takes getting used to, I can't think of any more examples at the moment (I left IDEA a year ago...). I just remember my painful transition :)
  10. More IDEA comparisons[ Go to top ]

    I've been using IDEA since 3.x and am using the beta of 4.5 now. I've used Eclipse 2.x, 3.x and WSAD 4.x and WSAD 5.x. The differences between IDEA and Eclipse:

    - IDEA just works. All the features that Eclipse 3 is just adding are from IDEA and they still work better there. When you're in a code region the region is higlighted in the bar, the _file header_ is collapsed by default, the key map is intuitive, etc.

    - The inspections that were a plugin for 4.0 and come with 4.5 are phenomenal - you can have it warn you about threading issues, serialization problems, code complexity, etc. All on the fly. And many of the inspections have quick automated code fixes.

    - The JSP support is good, no extra plugins required.

    - Duplicate code search, structural search (e.g., find all methods of an anonymous class that take a single Object parameter), dependency analysis (e.g., when I select a package or module, tell me the jars and other classes that they use - or vice versa).

    - General EJB support is ok, but not amazing. General debugging support is ok (JSR 45, Weblogic, Tomcat, conditional breakpoints, hot code replace, etc.).

    - Refactoring support is more extensive - with the release of 4.5 they have full JDK 1.5 support - folding of arbitrary ranges - good Junit support - gutter indicators for overrides, etc.

    Its not perfect of course, Eclipse is better at:

    - CVS. Eclipse is just a wonderful CVS client.

    - The problem list. IDEA tracks TODOs throughout the code but you don't have a central location for compile warnings and problems.

    But don't believe other people, try them both and see for yourself.
  11. Happy happy. Joy joy.[ Go to top ]

    Great to see the 3.0 final released.
  12. Happy happy. Joy joy.[ Go to top ]

    Great to see the 3.0 final released.
    I dare say it will be. But that's not what it says above:
    "Today the Eclipse Foundation pre-announced the availability of the royalty-free 3.0 release of the Eclipse Platform ... Eclipse RC 3 is available immediately and the final RC 4 is due by June 30th."

    Is every new beta or release candidate of something really newsworthy? Perhaps they should "pre-announce" versions 4.0 and 5.0 while they're at it, and get even more coverage :-)
  13. Eclipse is the best[ Go to top ]

    Eclipse 3.o is simply amazing , the folding and expanding of methods and class is simply great , if the user is allowed to define the region then it would have been very nice(eg) Inside a method i want to have two folds for two business logic(This option is available in Visual Studio.NET).
  14. Eclipse is the best[ Go to top ]

    This would be nice, but #region is a language feature in .NET, possible because of the high coupling of .NET and Visual Studio.NET If they added regions to eclipse it would break compatibility with all other java IDEs. Unless of course they put them in the projects metadata. But that would be difficult to do I think.
  15. Eclipse is the best[ Go to top ]

    imho, having multiple regions inside one method probably indicates that you should have two methods.

    b
  16. Eclipse is the best[ Go to top ]

    Completely agree with Brad.
  17. Eclipse is the best..not yet[ Go to top ]

    When it is the best, i'll switch to it and save $180. But it's not; that moniker currently belongs to Intellij IDEA 4.

    But Eclipse is getting better, so congrats! You finally have code folding, more gutter highlighting, and tons of other features, so its defintaly more usable. You've got XML buddy. Lomboz, and many cool plugins. But - it's not the best yet.

    Looking forward to 4.0!
  18. Arbitrary regions[ Go to top ]

    Arbitrary regions are still useful outside the context of a method. For example, it's useful in C# to have a region title "Member data", another titled "Property accessors", and another titled "Methods". That way, you can quickly move through your code to get to the parts that you need. Most classes have several distinct groups of members in them, whether they're methods, constants, get/set accessors, events (in C#), etc, and it's nice to be able to organize them into collapsible sections.
  19. Inside a method i want to have two folds for two business logic(This option is available in Visual Studio.NET).
    Eclipse has this - it's called Refactor -> Extract Method. You're methods are just too long (but it sounds like .NET is encouraging you to allow that bad practise . . . :)
  20. JSP Editing[ Go to top ]

    I have been an Eclipse users since the last 2 years & never looked back ever since. I have one questions for version 3.0; in this IDEVNEWS article, it says that Eclipse support JSP editing (last sentence). It is a built in support, through external plugin developed by the foundation or external plugin developed by external parties? I think this has been on top of our wish list.
  21. JSP Editing[ Go to top ]

    The article says

    <q>Finally, Eclipse 3.0 will provide support for debugging Java like files e.g. JSPs.</q>

    You can get that (and editing) in 2.1 with plugins like Lomboz and (there is another free/OSS plugin).
  22. JSP Editing[ Go to top ]

    there is another free/OSS plugin)...
    Do you mean sysdeo Plugin?
    http://www.sysdeo.com/eclipse/tomcatPlugin.html
  23. JSP Editing[ Go to top ]

    there is another free/OSS plugin)...
    Do you mean sysdeo Plugin?http://www.sysdeo.com/eclipse/tomcatPlugin.html
    Yup. Thanks. How soon we forget. :) I don't think it does editing though. Or didn't at least. I had another for color coding. Now if someone could just read my mind .... :)

    I used the Sysdeo plugin with Eclipse and Tomcat on my PC to debug JSPs that accessed EJBs that were running half the country (US) away - via VPN/Internet.
  24. I have not used IDEA before so cannot sat about it. Well goodies do comes with money. But as Freeware I believe there is no competitor other than NetBeans. As I know as Freeware (for non-commercial use I believe) JBuilder has best GUI (Swing) builder.

    I think, for Enterprise applications, combination of Eclipse with MyEclipseIDE (Subscription based) is a best bet at minimum cost.

    It may depends what level of details (technology/server specific) user wants with IDE. Commercial applications are very helpful in that case. ex: JBuilder Enterprise for BEA etc, WSAD, etc). But again as we know is what we pay is what we get (with some exceptions).

    For a personal user like me Eclipse is the best bet at minimum cost.

    Eclipse 3.0 Welcome.
  25. I have not used IDEA before so cannot sat about it. Well goodies do comes with money.
    The best thing that money buys is support. A commercial Independent Software Vendor has an immense fiscal incentive to control cost by making software that's intuitive and reliable enough not to need much support. I played with Eclipse twice, and it was very disappointing to see how many fundamental features were distributed accross plugins. Aggregate installation was a nightmare, especially Eclipse version conflicts between unrelated plugins. Whereas IntelliJ is turn key. If your time is cheap, than tinkering with Eclipse might be rewarding.
  26. I played with Eclipse twice, and it was very disappointing to see how many fundamental features were distributed accross plugins. Aggregate installation was a nightmare, especially Eclipse version conflicts between unrelated plugins. Whereas IntelliJ is turn key. If your time is cheap, than tinkering with Eclipse might be rewarding.
    I think the point that you're missing is that Eclipse is more than just an IDE. I've just installed it with a report writer plugin on my Project Manager's computer for him to evaluate. He's doing no development, but can still make use of Eclipse's abilities.

    While you can compare the IDE capabilities of the two products, it is worth bearing in mind the bigger picture too...

    /david
  27. I played with Eclipse twice, and it was very disappointing to see how many fundamental features were distributed accross plugins. Aggregate installation was a nightmare, especially Eclipse version conflicts between unrelated plugins. Whereas IntelliJ is turn key. If your time is cheap, than tinkering with Eclipse might be rewarding.
    Well Eclipse actually a platform than a Java IDE. All these plugins for Java make it a Java IDE. Actually it can be used for various falvours of applications. In programming sense, COBOL and C++ is simple example.

    These small plugins make it more powerful, Flexible and modular. User can add additional addons it they are not satisfied with one that comes along and being open architecture anybody can use it in any way. The other comparison to Eclipse is NetBeans Platform in general sense though implemntation is different.
  28. I've been using eclipse for about 3 years now and for me the best release in terms of stability and features that didn't get in the way was 2.1.x.

    As I sit here waiting for eclipse 3.0 to finish "Building Workspace" when
    all I told it to do was exit the IDE, I can't help but wonder what has changed
    with 3.0 that larger codebases are really a bear to work with.

    I can appreciate the improvement in background processing instead of always
    blocking like in previous releases but it seems that 3.0 requires complete
    workspace rebuilds if I just look at my computer wrong. Maybe 3.0 is becoming
    more lifelike and is able to sense my growing impatience with its demands and
    is lashing out at me by making me wait 5 minutes after saving a one line
    change to my source file.

    Meanwhile while waiting for eclipse to finish churning on whatever it needs to
    do when I simply change one line in a source file and save, I find it ironic
    that I need to fallback to emacs because the thing simply works when I just want
    to edit some text.

    Is it just me or is anyone else that's working on large code bases having
    problems with eclipse 3.0 always wanting to build the workspace for any and
    all code changes? Perhaps I need to recreate a new project and pare down the
    amount of source that I can edit.

    I've tried IntelliJ and it's not much better than eclipse in this regard
    as it takes all day for it to parse the source files in my project. Fine and
    good as long as I never have to shutdown and restart intellij. Once I do that
    the same exercise is performed where the entire codebase is groked by intellij.

    I realize that the problem may lie between chair and keyboard so that's why
    I ask if anyone has any tips or gotchas for setting up large codebases in
    either of these IDEs.

    P.S. - Eclipse is STILL building that workspace (5 minutes + now) so that I can exit the IDE *sigh*
  29. I've been using eclipse for about 3 years now and for me the best release in terms of stability and features that didn't get in the way was 2.1.x. As I sit here waiting for eclipse 3.0 to finish "Building Workspace" when all I told it to do was exit the IDE, I can't help but wonder what has changedwith 3.0 that larger codebases are really a bear to work with.I can appreciate the improvement in background processing instead of always blocking like in previous releases but it seems that 3.0 requires complete workspace rebuilds if I just look at my computer wrong. Maybe 3.0 is becomingmore lifelike and is able to sense my growing impatience with its demands andis lashing out at me by making me wait 5 minutes after saving a one line change to my source file.Meanwhile while waiting for eclipse to finish churning on whatever it needs todo when I simply change one line in a source file and save, I find it ironicthat I need to fallback to emacs because the thing simply works when I just wantto edit some text. Is it just me or is anyone else that's working on large code bases having problems with eclipse 3.0 always wanting to build the workspace for any and all code changes? Perhaps I need to recreate a new project and pare down theamount of source that I can edit. I've tried IntelliJ and it's not much better than eclipse in this regard as it takes all day for it to parse the source files in my project. Fine andgood as long as I never have to shutdown and restart intellij. Once I do thatthe same exercise is performed where the entire codebase is groked by intellij.I realize that the problem may lie between chair and keyboard so that's whyI ask if anyone has any tips or gotchas for setting up large codebases ineither of these IDEs.P.S. - Eclipse is STILL building that workspace (5 minutes + now) so that I can exit the IDE *sigh*
    I hope someone from Eclipse team can address your concern.
    But Atleast some settings can be changed like - not to compile on every SAVE of a java file ( or line in a file. ) and do a compile only when asked for thru a Rebuild All command.
  30. As I sit here waiting for eclipse 3.0 to finish "Building Workspace" when all I told it to do was exit the IDE [snip]
    Yeah, had that too. The solution is to click on the 'Details >>' button, and you'll find that to the right of each ongoing process displayed in the details, there is a square red 'stop' button. (You can do the same from the 'Progress' view.) If you stop the rebuild, Eclipse will exit.

    If you've just changed a line and want to carry on editing, clearly you can click on 'Run in Background'.

    But generally I agree - Eclipse 3.0 uses more memory and is slower than 2.1. But isn't that always the way with software. (I believe it's called 'progress'!)

    /david
  31. Thanks to all people working on eclipse, you guys done a very good job.
  32. I miss the ability to add arbitrary Java versions and compiler options.
    E.g. I would like to use 1.5, but I don't think that's possible. Unless I'm missing something?
  33. I miss the ability to add arbitrary Java versions and compiler options.E.g. I would like to use 1.5, but I don't think that's possible. Unless I'm missing something?
    Window | Preferences - Java/Installed JREs

    You can use 1.5 but not all the features within IDE. I do believe there is a plugin though.
  34. Some support for 1.5 is available today. Check http://dev.eclipse.org/viewcvs/index.cgi/~checkout~/jdt-core-home/r3.0/main.html#updates for details.