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News: JBoss Application Server 4 RC 1 released

  1. JBoss Application Server 4 RC 1 released (25 messages)

    JBoss, Inc has released 4.0.0 RC1 of their application server. This is the release that was J2EE 1.4 certified last week and includes the following additions: JMS 1.1, J2EE CA 1.5, Java Authorization Contract for Containers support, EJB 2.1 support, JAX-RPC and other Web Services support.

    View the JBoss-4.0.0RC1 Release Notes

    Threaded Messages (25)

  2. These guys just spit out new cool versions. But they dont care to create and maintain a good document to help new programmers kick start. JBOSS has never released good documentation with any of their releases. Its a shame.
  3. Early on, documentation seemed to be the main revenue stream for JBoss, the deal was that the server was free, but you paid for the documents (a nominal fee for most buinesses). It will be interesting to see if that changes with their new focus on business services such as on-site support. Perhaps they'll realise that they'd probably get more money if they provided better documentation to get people off the ground quicker. Surely it's easier to get money out of people when they can realise the benefits of your software?
  4. Guys, you can download the documentation for free (not sure how much has been updated for 4.0 though).
  5. Guys, you can download the documentation for free (not sure how much has been updated for 4.0 though).
    Yes, we made the documentation free about a month ago.

    http://www.jboss.org/docs/index

    There's also our WIKI:

    http://www.jboss.org/wiki/Wiki.jsp

    There's also a bunch of books available. Search on Amazon.

    Bill
  6. I still can't see the documentation. The link always take you to a page that says

    "Only "MemberPlus" users have access to the online documentation.
        To become a "MemberPlus" user, fill out the appropriate section under the "My Account" area of the "Member Menu".

    eventhough I already registered myself as MemberPlus user. May be it's time to change your business model Jboss so at least you can make some money, hire some guys who can at least take care of your comapnay website:-)

    Hope authenticating a user and redirecting them to documentation page is not too much to handle for JBoss Appserver or is it...
  7. I still can't see the documentation. The link always take you to a page that says"Only "MemberPlus" users have access to the online documentation. To become a "MemberPlus" user, fill out the appropriate section under the "My Account" area of the "Member Menu".
    If click on the "My Account" link, can then follow login link and login. At that point can go to the documentation download link and see the doc. Just created a new account and was able to see it, as well as logging out and following the previous "My Account" link and logged in from there and able to see it. You are correct in that it does not redirect automatically.
  8. In my opinion the biggest problem with JBoss is the lack of good administering tool.
  9. In my opinion the biggest problem with JBoss is the lack of good administering tool.
    We have this:

    http://www.jboss.org/wiki/Wiki.jsp?page=WebConsole

    Supports graphing, alert monitoring, and snapshotting of any JMX MBean. There's also some limited cluster management.

    Now that the certification monkey is off our backs you should see something delivered by end of year or sooner as we've been contracted to implement a better management interface.

    Bill
  10. http://mc4j.sourceforge.net/ is also useful for querying jboss servers using JMX
  11. Check out this also:
    http://www.servletsuite.com/jmx/jconsole.htm
  12. Yes... I like JBoss, but it need a easy aministering interface tool like the BES for example.

    Deivson Rayner
    Politec - Brazil
  13. Congrats!![ Go to top ]

    Hi Guys,

       Congrats on releasing RC1 as also your certification.

       There's nothing like good competition to keep you on your toes. I hope that your AOP will be one of the big differentiators in this space.

       Also, it would be nice to know what JVMs you support and recommend.

    Best Regards,
    ~A
  14. Congrats on the release and certification.

    Not meaning to start a flame war just genuinely curious: Why do people prefer JBoss to Sun Java System Application Server 8?

    As far as I know both of them are free, and Sun Java System Application Server 8 supports J2EE1.4 and has always had its documentation free.

    What are the reasons?

    1. Performance? (SUN claims Sun Java System Application Server 8 has better performance than JBoss (probably V3.x)) of course SUN doesn't/can't produce actual numbers. ;-)
    2. Features? What features does JBoss have that Sun Java System Application Server 8 doesn't have?
    3. Because JBoss is open source and you can change/fix bugs yourself?
    4. Manageablity? - Sun Java System Application Server 8 has a pretty good web and swing admin console.

    No flames just a Techie discussion ;-)

    Cheers

    Smythe

    PS: I have used Java System Application Server 8 but not JBoss thats why I'm curious.
  15. I have used Java System Application Server 8.
    So you're the one.

    Ryan
  16. Smart arse ;-) LOL
  17. SUN AS & JBoss[ Go to top ]

    I have used both.

    I prefer JBoss because it doesn't hide what it does. I see the logging coming out, and when I look in the service xml files, it all matches up. So even though I don't really know (or want to know) exactly how each component works, I feel more confident that I *could* change something if I wanted to. (I guess this applies to the source code also).

    With Sun AS, though I have no problems with it as a turnkey product and it does what it does pretty well, the innards tend to be hidden away. No doubt they will try to convince you that's a good thing and in some circumstances they may be right. But the result is that I feel less in control.

    Just my opinion, and very unscientific. Sorry.

    Regards
    Kit
  18. JBoss & SunAS 8[ Go to top ]

    I've also tried with both, the Sun server seems to be fine (I never used the Swing-Admin console, I thought it was removed with V7?), however, main reason for choosing JBoss was JDK 1.5 support...
    If I didn't need 1.5 support I'd probably use Sun's server, because:
    *) I have the _impression_ (!!!) that JBoss really is technically superior, still we got more performance from SunAS (this was really just an automated test of our application on a _single developer PC_ (client+AS+DB), so it only says something about the performance on a development machine, this was what we wanted to know (and may be specific to our application); probably this is because of the "overhead" of all the goodies JBoss has. And SunAS consumed less memory)
    *) JBoss really misses a good admin-console (And as a hint to JBoss team (though it will probably be ignored): I like Swing consoles _a lot_ more than web-consoles (see BES, really cool); Though web consoles are IMO now "usable" an application console is definitely more user-friendly... why does everyone want these web-consoles? Some have recognized and now "The client is back" (yeah... they needed long to recognize an application shouldn't be presented through a document-markup language... why did noone invent a TeX console? Maybe PDF? Would be even clumsier than HTML...)
    *) I miss a good deployment tool for JBoss (yadda yadda, I _don't_ think XML editing is more user friendly, as some OS projects claim... it's fine as a second option, a UI that generates XML would be great. Also see BES for a good deployment tool, make it more stable though ;-)

    Don't want to say JBoss is not good, using it currently and enjoying the work with it. Thanks much to JBoss team!

    Messi
  19. JBoss & SunAS 8[ Go to top ]

    In my tests, Sun's latest is pretty quick, particularly in clusters (their session clustering was almost as fast as ours in small-scale tests.) With JBoss, I've had weird performance results .. when graphed out over time, it (throughput) is not at all even, but that could just be a lack of tuning. JBoss _definitely_ uses more memory. Compared to Sun's offering, JBoss was often easier (ok, maybe "smoother" is a better word) to work with in dev mode. I'm not an expert on either one, so consider this all a "novice" statement.

    Anyway, the JBoss certification is a huge step forward; congratulations on that, since they're the first open source J2EE project to get there, and it apparently wasn't "a walk in the park."

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Clustered JCache for Grid Computing!
  20. JBoss & SunAS 8[ Go to top ]

    Hi Cameron,

    Curious to know what type of bechmark you used and the version of SunAS you
    used when you note that "their session clustering was almost as fast as ours".

    I know that Coherence also has many modes of replication. Which mode were
    you comparing to?

    Thanks

    Sreeram
  21. JBoss & SunAS 8[ Go to top ]

    Hi Sreeram,
    Curious to know what type of bechmark you used and the version of SunAS you used when you note that "their session clustering was almost as fast as ours".
    Just miscellaneous tests, more looking for problems with integration than anything else. (Sun's integration is exceptional, since they built it. ;-) Sun's clustering in SunONE app server is done on top of Clustra, which is a clustered database system that Sun bought. Since Coherence is a Java object manager (not a database) it has certain efficiencies that make a measurable performance difference for purposes such as session management in a cluster.
    I know that Coherence also has many modes of replication. Which mode were you comparing to?
    Coherence has a lot of different "data topologies" for sharing / replicating / partitioning / caching data in a cluster. The Coherence*Web module is built on top of these various topologies to provide HTTP session management "out of the box." It uses near caching with partitioned caches to manage most of the session information, with a small amount of management information fully replicated (if I remember correctly.) With Coherence Enterprise Edition, which enables Coherence*Web to do various sticky-load balancing optimizations, the optimal HTTP request will use zero packets total to access a session and on average around 5 packets total (all point-to-point) for the clustered update (eliminating any single points of failure) of the session.

    We're working on a customer story right now with a very large install of Coherence*Web. The scalability is almost linear to the extent of the switch (on high end switches, this means that the scalability is linear up to the number of ports that can be hung off of the switch, which is often several hundred ports, meaning several hundred servers.)

    Our session management also supports pluggable data models for the session objects, allowing optimizations to be done for serialization, chopping up of the sessions, etc. In 2.5 we will ship our third model; currently we have a "traditional" and a "split" model. The "split" model is optimized for supporting large HTTP sessions, for example; we have customers with average session sizes in the hundreds of KB and into the MBs.

    Peace,

    Cameron Purdy
    Tangosol, Inc.
    Coherence: Shared Memories for J2EE Clusters
  22. JBoss & SunAS 8[ Go to top ]

    I've also tried with both, the Sun server seems to be fine (I never used the Swing-Admin console, I thought it was removed with V7?)
    Neither 7.x nor 8.x have a Swing admin console - they are both browser-based; 6.x did but that was quite a while back. The confusion may be that the assembly / deploytool is swing based.

    Some of the reasons browser-based consoles are good :

    * easily remote & secure
    * naturally firewall firendly
    * client ubiquity
    * uses basic technology supported by the app server

    If you're running your app servers on hardened boxes in a locked room these are important requirements. Maybe emerging WS management standards and a renewed push for client side java could force a re-think.

    Rich Sharples
    Sun Microsystems
  23. Rich,

    * easily remote & secure
    RMI can use http as a transport, I remeber there is also a technology much pushed and not deserving it... SHOWER GEL or something like this ;-)

    * naturally firewall firendly
    Sure, http-transport is available for almost ALL modern remote protocols (or is even the preferred transport for SOAP/WS)

    * client ubiquity
    And I though Java is on almost all desktop PCs... ;-) Honestly, it's not asked too much to install a JVM to manage your AppServer... ultimately, this shouldn't be either-or! In most companies, there is little need for the Admin to manage the server from wherever he is... often for security, management is locked down to one station.

    * uses basic technology supported by the app server
    So RPC in all of its forms (JRMP, IIOP, SOAP/WS) is not "basic technology supported by the AppServer"? There is even a specific client framework...

    Finally, according to design patterns, an application (an AppServer with Admin interface falls under this category I guess) should separate its UI from business logic, right? So it shouldn't be too dificult to build both a Web and a Swing UI, these are really very basic UIs with tree-objects and property editors; Let some student write the Swing UI if you like.
    Your first two points are thanks to the transport, not HTML, and RMI can be transported over http(s) also (let the user choose which transport to use).
    I agree on the third point, but this should be possible with a JVM also. And if I really need, I can still use the Web-Console.
    The fourth one is neither compelling nor can I agree on it...

    Not that the Web Console of SunAS 8 is bad, it's great, but its still limited by essentially being a more-or-less static _document_ (!!!).

    regards,

    Messi
  24. JBoss & SunAS 8[ Go to top ]

    *) I miss a good deployment tool for JBoss (yadda yadda, I _don't_ think XML editing is more user friendly, as some OS projects claim... it's fine as a second option, a UI that generates XML would be great. Also see BES for a good deployment tool, make it more stable though ;-)Don't want to say JBoss is not good, using it currently and enjoying the work with it. Thanks much to JBoss team!Messi
    Look at Lomboz. I here it is good for building EJBs and such. I also hear that JBuilder has good stuff (from one of their developers at JavaOne). IntelliJ might have a plugin too.

    As far as deploying in general? No tool other than Windows explorer (or Unix equalivalent) is need. Move/copy your deployments to the deploy directory and JBoss deploys them.

    Bill
  25. JBoss & SunAS 8[ Go to top ]

    Never tried Lomboz (this is Eclipse right? Used Eclipse with IBM's newly released toolset, the pity is it doesn't support JDK 1.5), know that JBuilder overally has great support for JBoss (but doesn't support 1.5), but I really like IDEA much better; a plugin only exists for older versions (think for V3).
    I know that I just need to drop my files to deploy, with "DeployTool" I really meant a "graphical DDEditor" for JBoss-specific DDs. Sure, because of DTD the XML file is much better to edit than a e.g. property file (with a supporting, i.e. non-basic, XML editor), still I like UIs better. Thus, I'm stuck editing XML files...

    regards,

    Messi
  26. Graphical JBoss DDEditor[ Go to top ]

    For whom it may concern (FYI), there is a new revision of the JBoss IDEA plugin working with IDEA 4.5, providing (among other useful JBoss utilities) a graphical DDEditor.
    Thanks much to Fuhrer Engineering!

    Messi