Geronimo: A Developer's Notebook: Draft Chapters 1 and 2

Discussions

News: Geronimo: A Developer's Notebook: Draft Chapters 1 and 2

  1. David Blevins is the author of Geronimo: A Developer's Notebook, and O'Reilly has released the first two chapters in draft mode. The chapters available are "Setting up and Running Geronimo", and "Deployment Options".

    Geronimo: An Advanced Look

    Direct: Setting up and Running Geronimo, Deployment Options

    Threaded Messages (15)

  2. sweet[ Go to top ]

    Sweet,
      I can't wait to learn this new application server. JBoss and Spring haven't been doing anything innovative lately.

     I'd love to learn a new IDE as well. You guys thought about building an IDE from scratch as well. That would be great! How about a new open source servlet container to replace Tomcat That would be exellent!
  3. can't stop laughing[ Go to top ]

    Sweet,   I can't wait to learn this new application server. JBoss and Spring haven't been doing anything innovative lately. I'd love to learn a new IDE as well. You guys thought about building an IDE from scratch as well. That would be great! How about a new open source servlet container to replace Tomcat That would be exellent!
    oh man, that almost bust my gut from laughter
  4. can't stop laughing[ Go to top ]

    Sweet, I can't wait to learn this new application server. JBoss and Spring haven't been doing anything innovative lately. I'd love to learn a new IDE as well. You guys thought about building an IDE from scratch as well. That would be great! How about a new open source servlet container to replace Tomcat That would be exellent!
    oh man, that almost bust my gut from laughter
    I don't have to learn a new one because since the direction of JBoss has always been ambiguous (open source on the surface, closed source deep down), I never thought it safe to use it or recommend it to anyone.

    Plus, I hope Geronimo will have a recovery log and TCP/IP multiplexing like weblogic does.
  5. can't stop laughing[ Go to top ]

    I don't have to learn a new one because since the direction of JBoss has always been ambiguous (open source on the surface, closed source deep down)
    Some information on contributing to JBoss since you seem to be misinformed.

    We've added about 25-30 new committers over the last 12 months. Our committers and patch submitters retain copyright we just require them to license under LGPL. Our bug list is hosted openly on sourceforge and is a good first place to start when beginning to contribute

    www.sourceforge.net/projects/jboss

    You can find our TODO lists here if you're interested in contributing on a feature.

    http://www.jboss.org/developers/roadmap/JBossRoadmap.html

    We are lenient about granting CVS access. Show initiative(code) and you're in. We do not have a legal document you have to sign like other OSS organizations, but we do require a short interview through email or messenger before granting CVS privileges.

    You are also free to add documentation on our WIKI which is a great help to the community:

    http://www.jboss.org/wiki/Wiki.jsp

    Or discuss development on our forums:

    http://www.jboss.org/index.html?module=bb&op=main&c=3

    If you are interested in contributing to JBoss, but need to come up to speed, our professional documentation is free of charge and available here:

    http://www.jboss.org/docs/index

    Some interesting things coming down the pipe soon that may perk your interest in contributing:

    JBoss 4.0 final
    JBoss AOP 1.0 final (with Eclipse integration)
    EJB3 early access release


    Best regards,

    Bill
  6. can't stop laughing[ Go to top ]

    Some information on contributing to JBoss since you seem to be misinformed. We've added about 25-30 new committers over the last 12 months. Our committers and patch submitters retain copyright we just require them to license under LGPL.
    I still view JBoss as a risky platform. There is too much conflict of interest going on. I am not worried about code being "stolen" - I am worried about the platform just falling by the wayside. When that happens it won't matter who owned what if nobody wants to maintain it.

    And the priorities are still not where they are supposed to be. It's unbelievable that a J2EE certified program doesn't need to have a recovery log.

    I appreciate your clarifications though in case I should change my mind.
  7. can't stop laughing[ Go to top ]

    It's unbelievable that a J2EE certified program doesn't need to have a recovery log.I appreciate your clarifications though in case I should change my mind.
     Log is a good way to implement recovery for performance reasons, but it can be implemented without it too. Is it possible to find some documentation about JBoss and Geronimo recovery ?
  8. can't stop laughing[ Go to top ]

    Log is a good way to implement recovery for performance reasons, but it can be implemented without it too. Is it possible to find some documentation about JBoss and Geronimo recovery ?
    The only other way I know to do recovery is using shadow paging. Anything else?
  9. can't stop laughing[ Go to top ]

    I don't have to learn a new one because since the direction of JBoss has always been ambiguous (open source on the surface, closed source deep down)
    For open-source J2EE, go to JOnAS site: http://jonas.objectweb.org
    Forge CVS tree: http://forge.objectweb.org/projects/jonas/
    JOnAS documentation: http://forge.objectweb.org/projects/jonas-doc/ (comes with translations in French, German, Chinese...)

    SourceBeat targets a book on JOnAS pretty soon: http://www.objectweb.org/phorum/read.php?f=25&i=70&t=70

    See, there's some good *open* source J2EE around, with *open* documentation, and people working on books too!

    BTW, keep up the good job, David ;-)
  10. can't stop laughing[ Go to top ]

    oh man, that almost bust my gut from laughter
    Have you read Hani's blog ? I havent laughed so good a long time !


    :-)

    Perhaps this is why O'Reilly is such a prestigious publisher. They have the uncanny ability to turn absolutely worthless incomprehensible frothing drivel into something mildly inoffensive. Hats off to them if they manage to salvage anything out of this train-wreck though.
  11. Geronimo could be worth waiting ![ Go to top ]

    Most of the Apache products have been quite impressive and people around the globe are more then satisfied,using them in development to production environment.

    For Instance Apache Web server powers nearly 70% websites J2EE/Non J2EE. Personally, using Apache or Tomcat has been fun and I am very anxiously awaiting the geronimo safe release.I intend to replace my existing server to Geronimo.But I guess, this will have to wait untill Dec....hmm

    Apache + Geronimo + MySQL + Eclipse + Struts + Maven = WOW !

    Cheers
    VIJAY
    J2EE Lead.
  12. sweet[ Go to top ]

    Notable Jboss Innovations:
    1) CMS -- ooh how the world held its breath while they were building this
    2) Mail server -- Java based mail server -- who'd have thunk it !!
    3) Not free documentation

    Wohooo!
  13. I think the Bile Blog described this work of 'art' best:

    http://jroller.com/page/fate/20040810#the_single_worst_technical_draft
  14. Just to be straight, no one is claiming this is finished product. It is a draft, nothing more. All constructive criticism, even Hani's, is welcome and will not fall on deaf ears.

    The two chapters were published solely for the upcoming Geronimo 1.0 M2 release so that people could have something more than a wiki in terms of documentation. O'Reilly normally likes to sell books, so this took a bit of convincing to make happen.

    I realize that getting crap is par for the course, that's fine. As long as some people are grateful to have more documentation than was previously available, I'm happy.


    -David
  15. Hani's blog asside, I think people should give this book a chance. This is only a draft - if you saw one of my early drafts I doubt you would like it either. The idea is to get feedback, which David is now getting.

    David is a good writer - these chapters just need less editing and more of David's natural style. When its release it will be a great book, I'm sure of it. David is an excellent teacher and communicator and really cares about people learning. Anyway, read the chapters for yourself and don't judge them based on the negative feedback from this and other sites - after all TheServerSide.com is not exactly the best resource for balanced feedback.
  16. It's always dangerous...[ Go to top ]

    It's dangerous to put early chapters up on a forum like this one. We didn't put out very early chapters of Better, Faster, Lighter for that reason. The final form will probably look nothing like this form. I do like the Developer Notebook format, and I'll probably do one for Spring. But I've got to admit, the tone is so informal that it's tough to get the voice right. Kudos to Brett (for the Tiger book). It's a fantastic book, with a strong, informal, and consistent voice.

    I'd echo what Richard said about the book. He's sold a few books in his time. He knows how to spot talent, and knows what he's doing.

    - Bruce Tate