Early Access of NetBeans Profiler available

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News: Early Access of NetBeans Profiler available

  1. Early Access of NetBeans Profiler available (15 messages)

    The NetBeans project is pleased to announce that the first look at NetBeans Profiler, an integrated CPU and memory profiler for NetBeans IDE 3.6, is now available.

    The Profiler is based on the JFluid research project that has been in development at SunLabs for the last two years and adds tight integration into the NetBeans IDE and an improved user interface.

    * Feature Highlights

      - Memory profiling. Track object allocations and garbage collection, with results showing the amount of memory occupied by instances of each class and the ability to determine from which places in the code those instances were created.
        
      - CPU performance profiling. Measuring the performance of the entire application, specific feature or a code fragment, allowing you to pinpoint places in the code that cause performance problems upon application startup or during execution.

      - Low-overhead profiling. One of the unique features of the NetBeans profiler is the ability to significantly decrease the profiling overhead by focusing the profiling instrumentation to a specific piece of code only. For example, this allows you to measure the performance of the execution of specific feature without affecting the rest of the application's execution. Similarly, the results are focused on that particular piece of code, which makes the analysis much easier.
      
      - Task-based approach. NetBeans Profiler strives to significantly decrease the complexity of typical performance-related analysis. Built-in tasks enable you to preset the profiler into the configuration that is most suitable for the particular task that you are working on.
        
      - Tight integration into the IDE workflow. Running the application in Profiler is done exactly the same way as regular execution, without the need for any complex class path or startup option setup.

    For more information and to download NetBeans Profiler, visit http://profiler.netbeans.org.

    The JFluid/NetBeans Profiler team

    Threaded Messages (15)

  2. JFluid[ Go to top ]

    I would like to commend JFluid team on their achievement. JFluid was the only free profiler that did not crash when I was profiling a large application I am working on. This is probably due to JVMPI limitations that JFluid goes around. I highly recommend this tool to everyone.

    Artem
  3. To see how badly it is coded and why does it eat entire memory and cpu when i start net beans. Why dont u guys just copy code from Eclipse. Lets just say that sun cant make a single software work well and so lets make modifications to eclipse code and re sell. Isnt that what suse and red hat doing to linux ? someone else's brain sold by someone else..
  4. I am sure you have not run netbeans 3.6[ Go to top ]

    I have been using netbeans3.6 for the last 3 months. Though I use WSAD5.1/Eclipse at work most of the time. I find it quite responsive and requires less memory than
    Eclipse 3.0. Though it does not have some of the features like refactoring, it does have features that eclipse does not have.

    Your comments are not very constructive to say the least. Have you reported the problems to netbeans?

    As noted earlier in many forums, TSS is subscribed by a large number of whiners, who do not hesitate to use free software, but post destructive comments when it does not meet their expectations.
  5. I am sure you have not run netbeans 3.6[ Go to top ]

    I have been using netbeans3.6 for the last 3 months. Though I use WSAD5.1/Eclipse at work most of the time. I find it quite responsive and requires less memory than Eclipse 3.0. Though it does not have some of the features like refactoring, it does have features that eclipse does not have.Your comments are not very constructive to say the least. Have you reported the problems to netbeans? As noted earlier in many forums, TSS is subscribed by a large number of whiners, who do not hesitate to use free software, but post destructive comments when it does not meet their expectations.
    I have used forte and then netbeans for a year and then switched to Eclipse 2.1 and now 3.0. And there is a huge difference in how they work. I will NEVER suggest anyone to use netbeans. Its the slowest, featureless, dumbest IDE i have ever seen. Visual cafe was a better product that netbeans. I will go with IDEA and pay $500, but not take up netbeans. The problems are numerous memory is the first which hits you thats why I said it. And i m not a whiner but you seem to be one. Eclipse 3.0 startup time has gone up, but so have the number of features. It outnumbers netbeans by light years. And i dont have to restart my eclipse every now and then. I use it for months without restarting. On the other hand netbeans freezes my screen & other aplications. I have to close everything on my box to use netbeans. It just SUCKS - just like any other sun software. Its worst than some of microsoft products.
    So keep quiet now.
  6. You are talking about NetBeans 3.5[ Go to top ]

    I have been using netbeans3.6 for the last 3 months. Though I use WSAD5.1/Eclipse at work most of the time. I find it quite responsive and requires less memory than Eclipse 3.0. Though it does not have some of the features like refactoring, it does have features that eclipse does not have.Your comments are not very constructive to say the least. Have you reported the problems to netbeans? As noted earlier in many forums, TSS is subscribed by a large number of whiners, who do not hesitate to use free software, but post destructive comments when it does not meet their expectations.
    I have used forte and then netbeans for a year and then switched to Eclipse 2.1 and now 3.0. And there is a huge difference in how they work. I will NEVER suggest anyone to use netbeans. Its the slowest, featureless, dumbest IDE i have ever seen. Visual cafe was a better product that netbeans. I will go with IDEA and pay $500, but not take up netbeans. The problems are numerous memory is the first which hits you thats why I said it. And i m not a whiner but you seem to be one. Eclipse 3.0 startup time has gone up, but so have the number of features. It outnumbers netbeans by light years. And i dont have to restart my eclipse every now and then. I use it for months without restarting. On the other hand netbeans freezes my screen & other aplications. I have to close everything on my box to use netbeans. It just SUCKS - just like any other sun software. Its worst than some of microsoft products.So keep quiet now.
    With NetBeans 3.5 and earlier I would agree with you entirely. It was unstable, unresponsive and looked terrible.

    NetBeans 3.6 is in an entirely different league to previous versions. Unlike previous versions it is stable, responsive, and LESS memory than Eclipse. I know this because I use both NetBeans and Eclipse.

    NetBeans 4.0 has a better windowing system than Eclipse 3.0. Eclipse 3.0 has no autopopup toolbars. NetBeans 4.0 also has a new look with new icons.

    I would not agree that Eclipse offers more features than NetBeans. To start with editor abbreviations in NetBeans are much more efficient from an interaction perspecive than the nearest equivalent (templates) in Eclipse. Eclipse isn't very useful without any plugins. NetBeans supports web applications out of the box. Eclipse currently has better refactoring support than NetBeans. NetBeans 4.0 adds some refactoring, but not all the options of Eclipse. NetBeans has the JFluid profiler. Eclipse has no equivalent (free or otherwise).

    You really should keep up to date with the latest tools before making comments about them. Your comments really refer to NetBeans 3.5 and earlier (In which case I would agree with you entirely).

    Since I use both the latest versions of Eclipse and NetBeans I am in a better position to comment on their relative merits than someone who has only used older and broken versions of NetBeans.
  7. You are talking about NetBeans 3.5[ Go to top ]

    I have been using netbeans3.6 for the last 3 months. Though I use WSAD5.1/Eclipse at work most of the time. I find it quite responsive and requires less memory than Eclipse 3.0. Though it does not have some of the features like refactoring, it does have features that eclipse does not have.Your comments are not very constructive to say the least. Have you reported the problems to netbeans? As noted earlier in many forums, TSS is subscribed by a large number of whiners, who do not hesitate to use free software, but post destructive comments when it does not meet their expectations.
    I have used forte and then netbeans for a year and then switched to Eclipse 2.1 and now 3.0. And there is a huge difference in how they work. I will NEVER suggest anyone to use netbeans. Its the slowest, featureless, dumbest IDE i have ever seen. Visual cafe was a better product that netbeans. I will go with IDEA and pay $500, but not take up netbeans. The problems are numerous memory is the first which hits you thats why I said it. And i m not a whiner but you seem to be one. Eclipse 3.0 startup time has gone up, but so have the number of features. It outnumbers netbeans by light years. And i dont have to restart my eclipse every now and then. I use it for months without restarting. On the other hand netbeans freezes my screen & other aplications. I have to close everything on my box to use netbeans. It just SUCKS - just like any other sun software. Its worst than some of microsoft products.So keep quiet now.
    With NetBeans 3.5 and earlier I would agree with you entirely. It was unstable, unresponsive and looked terrible.NetBeans 3.6 is in an entirely different league to previous versions. Unlike previous versions it is stable, responsive, and LESS memory than Eclipse. I know this because I use both NetBeans and Eclipse.NetBeans 4.0 has a better windowing system than Eclipse 3.0. Eclipse 3.0 has no autopopup toolbars. NetBeans 4.0 also has a new look with new icons.I would not agree that Eclipse offers more features than NetBeans. To start with editor abbreviations in NetBeans are much more efficient from an interaction perspecive than the nearest equivalent (templates) in Eclipse. Eclipse isn't very useful without any plugins. NetBeans supports web applications out of the box. Eclipse currently has better refactoring support than NetBeans. NetBeans 4.0 adds some refactoring, but not all the options of Eclipse. NetBeans has the JFluid profiler. Eclipse has no equivalent (free or otherwise).You really should keep up to date with the latest tools before making comments about them. Your comments really refer to NetBeans 3.5 and earlier (In which case I would agree with you entirely).Since I use both the latest versions of Eclipse and NetBeans I am in a better position to comment on their relative merits than someone who has only used older and broken versions of NetBeans.
    Just wait for 3 more months and you will call this release of netbeans also as broken. See there is a huge difference. There was no BROKEN release of eclipse ever. Most of the thinsg were very vert stable. Once you try something and know its broken, you never get back to it again. And why would I. It was the worst designed IDE and I was so frustated with it. Crashing my machine all the time, freez the screns, no refactoring, the auto correction of errors is poor. Netbeans has way to go to catchup with tool like eclipse. So big old M A dont tell me that u have a better look at both and so can comment on this topic better than me. I have also worked on emacs and VI editors. So being old and grumpy is not the criteria to be right. What you see is what is right.
  8. You are talking about NetBeans 3.5[ Go to top ]

    Your rants are getting worse. Do not be condescending. Using your own words people are going to trust their own experience and not your rants.
  9. I have been using netbeans3.6 for the last 3 months. Though I use WSAD5.1/Eclipse at work most of the time. I find it quite responsive and requires less memory than Eclipse 3.0. Though it does not have some of the features like refactoring, it does have features that eclipse does not have.Your comments are not very constructive to say the least. Have you reported the problems to netbeans? As noted earlier in many forums, TSS is subscribed by a large number of whiners, who do not hesitate to use free software, but post destructive comments when it does not meet their expectations.
    I have used forte and then netbeans for a year and then switched to Eclipse 2.1 and now 3.0. And there is a huge difference in how they work. I will NEVER suggest anyone to use netbeans. Its the slowest, featureless, dumbest IDE i have ever seen. Visual cafe was a better product that netbeans. I will go with IDEA and pay $500, but not take up netbeans. The problems are numerous memory is the first which hits you thats why I said it. And i m not a whiner but you seem to be one. Eclipse 3.0 startup time has gone up, but so have the number of features. It outnumbers netbeans by light years. And i dont have to restart my eclipse every now and then. I use it for months without restarting. On the other hand netbeans freezes my screen & other aplications. I have to close everything on my box to use netbeans. It just SUCKS - just like any other sun software. Its worst than some of microsoft products.So keep quiet now.
    With NetBeans 3.5 and earlier I would agree with you entirely. It was unstable, unresponsive and looked terrible.NetBeans 3.6 is in an entirely different league to previous versions. Unlike previous versions it is stable, responsive, and LESS memory than Eclipse. I know this because I use both NetBeans and Eclipse.NetBeans 4.0 has a better windowing system than Eclipse 3.0. Eclipse 3.0 has no autopopup toolbars. NetBeans 4.0 also has a new look with new icons.I would not agree that Eclipse offers more features than NetBeans. To start with editor abbreviations in NetBeans are much more efficient from an interaction perspecive than the nearest equivalent (templates) in Eclipse. Eclipse isn't very useful without any plugins. NetBeans supports web applications out of the box. Eclipse currently has better refactoring support than NetBeans. NetBeans 4.0 adds some refactoring, but not all the options of Eclipse. NetBeans has the JFluid profiler. Eclipse has no equivalent (free or otherwise).You really should keep up to date with the latest tools before making comments about them. Your comments really refer to NetBeans 3.5 and earlier (In which case I would agree with you entirely).Since I use both the latest versions of Eclipse and NetBeans I am in a better position to comment on their relative merits than someone who has only used older and broken versions of NetBeans.
    Just wait for 3 more months and you will call this release of netbeans also as broken. See there is a huge difference. There was no BROKEN release of eclipse ever. Most of the thinsg were very vert stable. Once you try something and know its broken, you never get back to it again. And why would I. It was the worst designed IDE and I was so frustated with it. Crashing my machine all the time, freez the screns, no refactoring, the auto correction of errors is poor. Netbeans has way to go to catchup with tool like eclipse. So big old M A dont tell me that u have a better look at both and so can comment on this topic better than me. I have also worked on emacs and VI editors. So being old and grumpy is not the criteria to be right. What you see is what is right.
    I've used both Eclipse (not yet 3.0) and NetBeans/Forte for quite some time. My opinion is that NetBeans, from a functionality aspect, beats out Eclipse. I understand the flexibility that Eclipse provides with its plug-in approach, but its annoying that some things (like J2EE-web development) aren't provided out of the box. However, having said that I prefer the functionality of Netbeans to Eclipse, I've almost reached the point where I'll stop using it for good. 3.6 is better, and I really want to try 4.0 too, but this platform is a way too slow. One of the machines I use is a bit older, a laptop, with only 256 mb of RAM. Still Eclipse 2.1 starts in up in about 10 seconds and is extremely responsive. I know to walk away for about 5 minutes for some coffee when I try the same thing with Netbeans. (And its no picnic once its running either)

    Here's hoping 4.0 is more responsive.
  10. Nice but...

    I'm trying to attach the profiler to a running WebLogic server instance. I installed the Profiler module, fired up the WLS instance, clicked on Attach and Profile under Profile Menu option and it asks me for a working directory - ok, I assume this is the directory WLS is running from. I select that directory but the Attach button is still disabled. Despairing a little, I turn on the little checkbox, 'Attach on Startup' even though my server is already started but voila, the attach button springs to life. One more try - a dialog box prompts me to take a thread dump in the running server instance and then click ok. Dutifully did all that but it has been 5 minutes now and I'm still seeing the dialog 'connecting to the target VM'

    Click on Profiler help - nothing happens.

    Sigh...I was excited to read this profiler has little overhead, can attach to a running VM without chaging the startup command line, can detach when I want...uses bytecode instrumentation instead of the horrible JVMPI which renders other tools practically unusable with complex apps...

    Would love to get it to work though...can someone help please?
  11. Custom JVM[ Go to top ]

    Since I only used JFluid, I would not be able to give you exact instructions with respect to NetBeans profiler.

    The thing to look for is definitely a custom JVM that the profiler is shipped with. In JFluid you have to run your target application using this JVM in order to be able to profile. Read the manual for more information.

    Artem
  12. It uses a custom VM. The VM is in ~/.netbeans/modules/profiler-ea-vm/jre/

    HTH

    Regards
    Chuk
  13. Sorry about the delay, and thanks to everybody who has already responded to this question: you are right about the custom JVM and where it is located. However, the "working directory" that JFluid needs to establish the connection might be another issue with WLS. The definition of this thing is, essentially, the "user.dir" property as returned by the JVM that runs the application you want to profile. For an application launched as "c:\mydir>java MyApp" it's, naturally, "c:\mydir". However, with app servers this may be not so easy - the launch scripts of some of them (I personally am aware of at least the Sun ONE AS) tend to change the directory to some predefined thing before launching the AS main class. This may be the case with WLS as well, as some e-mails from its users that I received in the past seem to indicate. So you may need to read your AS documentation or just experiment (e.g. write a servlet that just prints the System.getProperty("user.dir")) to determine this directory.

    Regards,

    Misha Dmitriev
    NB Profiler Team
  14. JFluid Standalone[ Go to top ]

    Can I get JFluid as a standlone produce instead of as a plugin to use outside of NetBeans?

    Thanks
  15. JFluid Standalone[ Go to top ]

    The old, experimental standalone JFluid tool can still be downloaded from http://research.sun.com/projects/jfluid/download. Note though, that its UI is pretty much bare bones and in many respects much less intuitive than that of the NB plugin.

    Currently we are discussing a possibility of releasing an improved standalone version of JFluid in future. It would be useful to find out how many users really need it, as well as what other additions/improvements you would like to see. So, if you have any comments or suggestions, please send them to us at feedback at profiler dot netbeans dot org.

    Thanks and best regards,

    Misha Dmitriev
    NetBeans Profiler Team
  16. I realise that it can be a burden to maintain a standalone version beside the integrated one, but it also could help keeping the project fairly independent from the IDE. From my point of view, I vote with independence as much as possible, as I don't want to use netbeans (or any other IDE than I'm currently using, in other words I don't like to change my tools I'm used to).

    Cheers,
    Csaba.