NetBeans 4.0 Beta 1 Released

Discussions

News: NetBeans 4.0 Beta 1 Released

  1. NetBeans 4.0 Beta 1 Released (51 messages)

    The NetBeans(tm) team is proud to announce that the NetBeans Integrated Development Environment (IDE) 4.0 Beta 1 is now available. The NetBeans IDE provides a pure Java(tm) technology development environment for Windows, Linux, the Solaris(tm) Operating System and Mac OS X.

    Download the beta from:
         http://www.netbeans.org/downloads/index.html

    Key Features
    See http://www.netbeans.org/community/releases/40/index.html for more information.

    Java 2 Platform, Standard Edition 5.0 (J2SE) language feature support

    J2SE 5.0 (Tiger) brings important new language updates: metadata, generics, enumerated types and autoboxing of primitive types. NetBeans IDE 4.0 supports these new language features in the editor, debugger, refactoring, etc.

    Ant-based projects

    A completely new project system based on Apache Ant, the de facto standard for Java technology build tools, featuring:

         An open architecture, which third-party modules can extend to support current and future types of Java applications
         Project types for J2SE desktop, two-tier web applications (JSPs, servlets,...), and MIDP applications out of the box.

    Beginning users don't have to know Ant to use the system, but the full power of Ant is accessible to advanced Ant users. These project types come with built-in support for generating, developing and running unit tests using JUnit, the de facto standard in Java code testing.

    Java 2 Platform, Micro Edition (J2ME) MIDP development support

         Support for the Mobile Information Device Profile (MIDP) 2.0
         Support for the Connected, Limited Device Configuration (CLDC) 1.1
         Support for code obfuscation (commonly used to reduce application size)
         Easy integration of third party phone/device emulators
         
    Available as separate download NOW
      
    This release simplifies coding with templates for MIDlet and MIDlet suites. It solves device fragmentation problems by enabling you to edit and compile custom configurations for each device, without requiring separate source files for each device.

    See http://www.netbeans.org/kb/articles/mobility.html for more information.

    Java refactoring

    Refactoring allows developers to make sweeping changes to their code without affecting functionality. The refactoring in NetBeans IDE 4.0 provides features such as renames (class/method/field), move class,
    rename package, change method parameters, encapsulate field and find references.

    Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition (J2EE) development support for NetBeans IDE 4.x (Early Access available in October)

    The NetBeans team will release a J2EE module collection as a separate download for NetBeans IDE 4.0 Beta 2 that will extend the NetBeans IDE Web-Tier development capabilities and will allow EJB(tm) and Web Services development.

    Features include:
         Create EJB Modules and EJB Session Beans
         Synchronize Deployment Descriptor files
         New Web Service wizard to create Web Services artefacts
         New J2EE Application project type wizard, that allows the developer to define a J2EE Application (a set of Web Applications and EJB Modules)
         Deployment and execution target to Sun Java System Application Server
         Platform Edition 8.1 Beta and Tomcat 5

    Performance Profiler (coming soon)

    NetBeans is adding a CPU and memory performance profiler to its long
    list of features. The Profiler is based on the JFluid research project
    that has been in development at SunLabs for the last two years and adds
    tight integration into NetBeans IDE and an improved user interface.

    Features include:
      Memory profiling and leak detection
      CPU performance profiling
      Low-overhead profiling
      Task-based profiling
      Tight integration into the IDE workflow
      Attach to currently running JVM and do on-the-fly configuration changes

    The initial Early Access release is available NOW as a separate module
    collection download for NetBeans IDE 3.6. The beta version will be
    available as an additional download for the production version of
    NetBeans IDE 4.0 in December.

    See http://profiler.netbeans.org/ for more information.

    Threaded Messages (51)

  2. Way to go ...[ Go to top ]

    I always liked NetBeans. It sounds like 4 has added a lot of new features.
  3. Way to go ...[ Go to top ]

    I always liked NetBeans. It sounds like 4 has added a lot of new features.
    Looks good on a higher level. Still refactoring and some other features are way behind eclipse.
  4. Way to go ...[ Go to top ]

    I always liked NetBeans. It sounds like 4 has added a lot of new features.
    Looks good on a higher level. Still refactoring and some other features are way behind eclipse.
    Probably "eclipse" is a better name if we are talking about this feature, but I do not see how NetBeans is behind eclipse. Doe's it better rename files ?

    BTW I use both.
  5. Way to go ...[ Go to top ]

    I love netbeans. Best Java IDE!
  6. Way to go ...[ Go to top ]

    Congratulations to the NetBeans team!

    NetBeans 3.6 is great and I look forward to all the new features in 4.0.

    NetBeans is quite fast overall at 3.6 -- despite all the overblown Eclipse hype the speeds of these IDEs seem comparable overall. One item I should mention, however: the Java command line heap options really need to be adjusted in the ide.cfg file for NetBeans to really work optimally. For example, one might use the following for a sizable project:
      -J-Xss1024k -J-Xverify:none
      -J-Xms150m -J-Xmx150m -J-XX:NewSize=32m -J-XX:MaxNewSize=32m
      -J-XX:SurvivorRatio=10 -J-XX:PermSize=32m

    It would be helpful if the NetBeans folk would look at the JVM, ask questions of the user as needed, and then set such settings out of the box as appropriate for the machine, JVM, and user responses.
  7. Just started suing it[ Go to top ]

    I just started using it yesterday, after converting my projects over to the new Ant build system, it worked great. They're doing a lot to speed it up. Very nice. There are still some things that really need cleaning up though.

    The refactoring's encapsulate automaticaly makes both getters and setters, it would be nice to be able to just do one or the other if you are making your class immutable or what not.

    Anyways, great IDE ;)
      .adam
  8. Just started suing it[ Go to top ]

    Funniest typo ever !!
  9. NetBeans 4.0 Beta 1 Released[ Go to top ]

    Sounds like some really nice features. *Almost* makes me want to put IntelliJ on pause to give it a try ;) I haven't used NetBeans in about 1.5 - 2 years and at that time it was really slow and prone to lockup. I can't seem to wash the bad taste away enough to bring myself to try it again. Besides, I'm surprised they're still moving forward considering all the popularity Eclipse seems to be enjoying
  10. NetBeans 4.0 Beta 1 Released[ Go to top ]

    Besides, I'm surprised they're still moving forward considering all the popularity Eclipse seems to be enjoying
    Well considering it's used as the base for Sun's products it makes sence to continue.

    Besides, OOTB, NetBeans is far easier to use than Eclipse. Maybe not for hardcore advanced developers. For beginners in Java, it's much easier to use, and has much more stuff that is ready to use without having to configure a lot of things.

    The code formatter in JSPs is very good already at formatting the HTML/XML elements and ignoring the JSP code. If it will begin to format the Java code in declarations and scriptlets as well under its own identation structure it would be perfect!

    4.0 is nice, haven't yet seen if the Version Control linkup is as nice as the 3.6 version. I have hopes that it will be.
  11. Download problems...[ Go to top ]

    I'm trying to follow the link "NetBeans IDE 4.0 Beta 1 download"
    (on page "http://www.netbeans.org/downloads/index.html"),
    but I can't load the next page...

    Any alternatives?
  12. J2ME and Mac OS X[ Go to top ]

    I was hoping to see the J2ME MIDP development support released for Mac OS X... Unfortunately, this is not the case.
    Anyway, I will give it a try in the next few days.
  13. J2ME and Mac OS X[ Go to top ]

    I would like to as well. Unfortunately, there is no emulator environment for Mac OSX :( that we could use at the moment.
  14. J2ME and Mac OS X[ Go to top ]

    That's not completely true. You can have MIDP1.1 development with a working phone emulator on Mac OS X. You just have to start a X server.
  15. It's cool to have all these new features but I still can't
    get past the L&F of the tool.

    Here's a list of things that are just not quite right to me:

    -The windows L&F. Is it me or this "Windows" L&F circa 1998? I feel like
    I'm looking at JBuilder5.

    -The tree cell rendering just doesn't look right.
    There's too much space between each node in the tree.

    -The default font (I forget what it was) isn't appealing, nor is it large
    enough (10pt on eclipse == 12pt on netbeans it seems)). OK so this one's not
    really a problem but just an initial impression.

    -The menus items all have too much space on the left side of the icon.

    -If you expand a class in the tree and double click on one of the methods or members it does take you to the declaration but you can hardly tell because
    it doesn't highlight and center the member or method you've chosen.

    -The treetable in the options dialog shows rows of a table as well as the
    vertical lines of the tree.

    -In that same widget the usage of a column header for an expand/collapse button
    is unorthodox at best.

    -Clicking on some items will cause the same dialog to appear twice in a row. (See Indentation engines. Click on any engine's "User" button and then click
    on the "Default" button. You'll be greeted with the same dialog twice in a row, and if you're really lucky an NPE)

    -There's no way to view a type's hierarchy.

    This is all from 10 minutes with the tool.

    That said I think it's cool that there's a profiler being worked on and
    integrated. 1.5 support, MIDP support, J2EE support, again all great if the
    features are well done.

    I just can't help but wonder "Why does Sun keep dumping money into this project?". It's not as good as eclipse or intellij and doesn't appear to be on that track. Choice is always a good thing but I don't see why anyone would choose to use netbeans at this point other than to maybe
    1) mockup a GUI in swing.
    2) use the profiler.
    3) write a J2ME app.
  16. Still doesn't look quite "right"[ Go to top ]

    I think you are underestimating the popularity and power of NB. I have been using it since its Forte days and I live by it.

    I like how easily I can mount directories and Jars into my project in NB. I like the flexibilty it gives me. I like its integration with Ant. I like its "J2EE readiness" : I depend on its debugger while testing my apps on Jboss or Tomcat. I am looking forward to using its profiler. The only reason I tried Eclipse was its hyped up speed over NB and I found this to be just false advertising : I found NB just as fast and I didn't see any reason to switch.

    Refactoring with NB was never an issue as there were commercial product plug-ins to NB which did a much better job . Now even refactoring is included in NB ide

    So now what else has Eclipse got that NB doesn't have ?
  17. Still doesn't look quite "right"[ Go to top ]

    I don't doubt that there are people that use the tool.

    Other than the UI points I made above and the NPE I found
    in the property editor there are a couple of things that
    are missing that are pretty big to me but I realize that
    everyone has different ideas of what's important. At any
    rate those are:

    - The inability to open a class in a hierarchy viewer
    - cntrl-1 to suggest fixes for errors in your source code.
    - cntrl-shift-m to add an import for the explicit item you're
    editing. Or alt-enter in intellij.
    Netbeans only allows to "fix imports" which will operate on the whole class.

    Try this little experiment I just stumbled upon while looking for bullet
    points to answer you:

    1) Create a class
    2) Create an ArrayList
       ArrayList foo = new ArrayList();

    Netbeans gives you red squigglies. So now you'd like to add an import
    to fix that. Hit alt-shift-f to have netbeans "fix imports".

    Next gasp in utter disbelief at how you are now presented with a modal
    dialog that requires you to use your mouse to select which ArrayList you'd like to have imported. (java.util.ArrayList or java.util.Arrays.ArrayList)

    In eclipse or intellij you are presented with a small popup window that allows
    you to scroll to select the proper item to import.

    Perhaps these types of things aren't important to you but to me they are pretty
    core things that I do on a daily basis that enhance productivity.

    There's also no project support for creating a plugin.

    At any rate I realize it's a personal choice but at some level it's also a
    productivity choice. I'll use whatever makes me the most productive. I'm
    curious at the productivity value add with this tool over the others.
  18. Michael,

    If you are hung up on the importing of classes/packages in NB try alt-shift-i

    I believe there is a plug-in for creating plug-ins although I haven't had the need myself.

    I wasn't going to get into a my ide is bigger than yours but nobody else responded and I could tell you wanted your mind put at ease :)

    Michael
  19. Thanks Michael I'll give that a try and see what that does for me.
    But I don't imagine it changing the interaction because I still need
    to answer the question of which ArrayList I want imported and NB
    presents that question in a modal dialog that you have to use the mouse
    to make a selection as you can't tab to the drop down box to make a choice
    via keyboard.

    I know it's hard not to get into a holy war about these types of things.
    I spent a little time today looking at NB and am left wondering what
    it offers that the tools with a larger market share don't that makes
    it either compelling to switch, or at least compelling for certain tasks.

    Seems like mobile apps and profiling might be the standout features here.
  20. Still doesn't look quite "right"[ Go to top ]

    Another option to importing is Shift-Alt-I while having the cursor on the class you want to import. That one lets you choose with the keyboard without problems.
    I would call the Fix Imports dialog a bug, I'll file it as such.

    what do you mean by project support for creating plugin?
  21. Still doesn't look quite "right"[ Go to top ]

    In eclipse or intellij you are presented with a small popup window that allows you to scroll to select the proper item to import.Perhaps these types of things aren't important to you but to me they are prettycore things that I do on a daily basis that enhance productivity.
    Try alt-shift-i when the cursor is on ArrayList (it works in 3.6, haven't tried 4)
  22. Still doesn't look quite "right"[ Go to top ]

    In eclipse or intellij you are presented with a small popup window that allows you to scroll to select the proper item to import.Perhaps these types of things aren't important to you but to me they are prettycore things that I do on a daily basis that enhance productivity.
    Try alt-shift-i when the cursor is on ArrayList (it works in 3.6, haven't tried 4)
    Yep that works a little better. I at least get a dialog that I can negotiate
    with the keyboard. Although I find it troubling that one dialog, (alt-shift-i) can only find java.util.ArrayList and the other, (alt-shift-f) java.util.ArrayList and java.util.Arrays.ArrayList.

    Also seems like maybe alt-shift-i should be the menuitem that appears in the
    context menu of the source editor (right click) instead of alt-shift-f. alt-shift-i is nowhere to be found in a menu.

    I did find some things that were nice after poking around a bit more. The runtime tab that allows for easy configuration is very nice. And support for writing a webapp is very good.
    Very snappy with the embedded tomcat server. Would be nice to have a better
    JSP editor but for the price it's a nice environment.

    Also noticed that the automatic semicolon placement is in NB like eclipse.
    example:

    foo.myMethod("string")

    if you put a ; at the end of the String, both eclipse and NB will properly
    place it at the end of the line for you.
    foo.myMethod("string";)

    Placed anywhere else in the String eclipse doesn't place the ; at the end but NB does. Not sure if that's a good thing or not. Depends on whether or not you're trying to actually place a semicolon into your String or not. :-)
  23. Still doesn't look quite "right"[ Go to top ]

    I think you are underestimating the popularity and power of NB. I have been using it since its Forte days and I live by it.I like how easily I can mount directories and Jars into my project in NB. I like the flexibilty it gives me. I like its integration with Ant. I like its "J2EE readiness" : I depend on its debugger while testing my apps on Jboss or Tomcat. I am looking forward to using its profiler. The only reason I tried Eclipse was its hyped up speed over NB and I found this to be just false advertising : I found NB just as fast and I didn't see any reason to switch.Refactoring with NB was never an issue as there were commercial product plug-ins to NB which did a much better job . Now even refactoring is included in NB ideSo now what else has Eclipse got that NB doesn't have ?
    I cant believe that you live bu it and have been using it since forte days. After forte I have never re-visited it till today . and still furstated with it. ITs not just one thing , its a lot of small small things like color coding, automatic compiling on the fly , tree for a class or a package etc. ITs just is not anywhere near eclipse. But as they say - its difficult to convert a Democrat. into a Republican in a brisk. So is the case with IDE's . You cant change someone to use some other IDE that fast. For me Forte was so bad, slow , CPU hogger that I naver DARED to go back to it. Eclispe is the Best one for me for now.
  24. When this non-sense is going to stop[ Go to top ]

    I tried to use Lomboz with Eclipse in Linux(Fedor core 2). Every time I used, it froze the ide. Though the base tool is good, the most of the plugins are unfit for real life use.
    If you want to develop a web application, you need to use the plugin from sysdeo. Though it is good in what It does, it does not provide JSP support at all. The debugging support does not cover all the projects in the ide.

    NetBeans on the other hand, provide out of box supports for web applications, JSP debugging, JSP code completion, Swing GUI development.

    The memory usage is not much different from Eclipse. I am sure NetBeans people will fix it as 4.0 is just beta 1. The profiler that comes with netbeans 3.6 is excellent. There is a littel meter that shows the memory usage also. You can point to a class and automatically create JUnit tests.

    I work on WSAD5.1 which is certainly based on Eclipse. It has its quirks also.

    I feel there will be a strong competition to Eclipse.

    If you love Eclipse so much why don't use just use it and stop indulging in flame baits like this unless you have some vested interest.
  25. When this non-sense is going to stop[ Go to top ]

    Lomboz kinda sucks as well, and there are things about Eclipse I don't like. However overall the IDE is the best on the market. You can download or purchase a plugin for just about anything you'd ever need to do.

    For about $500 you can get an awesome JSP/Struts dev tool. Jigloo and Swing Designer ($290 or so) are very good SWING editors. There are also free external profiler tools that are far and above what is in 3.6.

    The thing here is that Netbeans 3.6 (not sure on 4) doesn't operate anything close to anything else. It's very confusing, has been very buggy in the past, and it's missing features. V4 just now adds refactoring, and not very much of it I might add.

    As for the IDE I love, that wouldn't even be Eclipse. That's reserved for Intellij IDEA. I have to use Eclipse because certain things aren't available in IDEA such as struts designer & swing (more than a panel designer) tools.

    Flame baits? I'll say this, if the TSS puts lame stuff on their site, then it's open war as far as I'm concerned. Everyone's opinion counts guy.
  26. Lomboz[ Go to top ]

    Lomboz kinda sucks as well
    Agreed!
  27. Still doesn't look quite "right"[ Go to top ]

    There's too much space between each node in the tree.-The default font (I forget what it was) isn't appealing, nor is it largeenough (10pt on eclipse == 12pt on netbeans it seems)). OK so this one's notreally a problem but just an initial impression.-The menus items all have too much space on the left side of the icon.-If you expand a class in the tree and double click on one of the methods or members it does take you to the declaration but you can hardly tell because it doesn't highlight and center the member or method you've chosen.-The treetable in the options dialog shows rows of a table as well as thevertical lines of the tree. -In that same widget the usage of a column header for an expand/collapse buttonis unorthodox at best.-Clicking on some items will cause the same dialog to appear twice in a row. (See Indentation engines.
    Give us a break !!!!!
    I just can't help but wonder "Why does Sun keep dumping money into this project?". It's not as good as eclipse or intellij and doesn't appear to be on that track. Choice is always a good thing but I don't see why anyone would choose to use netbeans at this point other than to maybe
    1) mockup a GUI in swing.
    2) use the profiler.
    3) write a J2ME app.
    Yes keep the profiler, GUI , J2ME and web app stuff rather make it look pretty
  28. Netbeans vs Eclipse[ Go to top ]

    Just to dispel any misguidings about Eclipse. Eclipse does have the support for all the technologies that you say it doesn't.
        MyEclipseIDE - full J2EE support including JSP editing and debugging
        Hyades - an Eclipse sub project that provides integrated test, trace and monitoring environment.
        VE - Eclipse sub project titled Visual editor for visually building GUI's

    We can go on with this discussion forever. The Bottom Line is Eclipse is for real programmers and Netbeans is for amateurs
  29. Not out of the box it doesn't.. MyEclipse costs money, and by the looks of the comments on the eclipse plugin site, seems to have a quite a few people unhappy.

    You install eclipse and what do you have? A java editor with support for creating plug-ins, will spawn notepad for editing JSPs.. Hmmn.. Not exactly the priority I would have given to things.

    Netbeans provides out of the box support for J2EE, tracing, debugging, GUI editing. It also allows you to easily find upgrades and new plugins without having to dig through the pile of dodgy, incomplete websites.

    Is there a decent FREE JSP editor for eclipse? If so, can someone tell the eclipse people that JSP editing is like java editing: necessary for a lot of the time.. So include it by default.

    I think for all the millions of *cough*mostly useless*cough* plugins out there, one would think that there would be a decent, free, included JSP plugin that comes with eclipse by default!

    Bottom line is that if you want a decent-out-of-the-box FREE IDE with actual IDE functionality for java, J2EE, source control and all the associated technologies then Netbeans wins hands down. I would think real programmers expect their tools to provide functionality rather than using a text editor?

    regards,Nathan Lee
  30. Don't be silly[ Go to top ]

    The Bottom Line is Eclipse is for real programmers and Netbeans is for amateurs
    It is clear from your post that Eclipse is being used by slashdot kiddies. Nobody else would make such a childish remark!
  31. Don't be silly[ Go to top ]

    The Bottom Line is Eclipse is for real programmers and Netbeans is for amateurs
    It is clear from your post that Eclipse is being used by slashdot kiddies. Nobody else would make such a childish remark!
    Good grief, and I was hoping to be enlightened. I switched from NB to Eclipse a year ago out of frustration with the tool and was wondering whether to look back - there are still some things I miss.

    Would anyone out of diapers with some experience of both tools care to comment on the current state of play of NB vs Eclipse? Someone able to outline their experience and opinions without resorting to religous convictions or name-calling?

    Thanks

     - Peter
  32. Huh?[ Go to top ]

    The Bottom Line is Eclipse is for real programmers and Netbeans is for amateurs
    It is clear from your post that Eclipse is being used by slashdot kiddies. Nobody else would make such a childish remark!
    Good grief, and I was hoping to be enlightened. I switched from NB to Eclipse a year ago out of frustration with the tool and was wondering whether to look back - there are still some things I miss.Would anyone out of diapers with some experience of both tools care to comment on the current state of play of NB vs Eclipse? Someone able to outline their experience and opinions without resorting to religous convictions or name-calling?Thanks - Peter
    I think calling all NetBeans users "ameteurs" and Eclipse programmers "real programmers" reeks of religous name-calling.
    If you wanted a balanced opinion of Eclipse vs NetBeans from someone who has used both why didn't you just say so? I have used both and here are my thoughts:

    Eclipse:
    -Eclipse 3.0 offers more refactoring options than NetBeans 4.0.
    -Eclipse editor text is smoothed while NetBeans text is both small and totally unsmoothed :( Will have to wait a few years for this to be properly fixed in Swing.
    -Eclipse uses more memory than NetBeans 3.6, but much less than the current NetBeans 4.0 beta.
    -No support for JSP, servlets by default :( Have to buy plugin or use one of the *lame* free plugins

    NetBeans:
    -Much more stable and responsive since version 3.6 : None of the null pointer errors and lockups which characterised 3.5 (which I hate BTW).
    -Look and feel is dramatically better in 3.6 and especially 4.0 (using a recent JDK)
    -Ever since NB3.6 I have been a fan of BOTH NetBeans and Eclipse.
    -With the NB4.0 windowing system (which is great) I believe that NetBeans has pulled ahead of Eclipse. Eclipse 3.0 was slightly ahead of NB3.6 IMHO.
    -NetBeans supports web apps and GUI design out of the box.
    -NetBeans 4.0 supports JDK5.0, while Eclipse is lacking in this regards

    Hope this helps

    regards
    M.
  33. Huh?[ Go to top ]

    Take a look at IntelliJ, I'm not going to go through a long feature comparison but I've used to a reasonable degree most IDEs and have settled for IntelliJ.
    It is indeed a personal choice and I have no desire to 'convert' anyone.
    However it is a very professional tool with many features that work well for high productivity. Certainly I never thought I would get the chance to code as easily as I can with this tool.

    It also allows you to code top down which is great when you're sketching out code from a design. As you mention classes or methods that you haven't written yet it smoothly allows you to generate the classes or methods you've described. This means you can code top down not bottom up.

    The main difference for me in IDEs (like we find in open source software also) is not features but ease of use. I spend very little (if any) time fighting my IDE. In fact I tend to find it suprises me by offering to do things for me I wouldn't have suspected. Now this is a very specific user experience and one you can only have by trying a particular tool out. IntelliJ was the first IDE to exceed my expectations rather than to disappoint me.

    Just incase you're wondering, before IntelliJ I preferred using vi/textpad style editors because I don't like fighting IDEs. Now I use IntelliJ for 'hardcore' coding and Gvim for bugfixing etc.

    Ultimately it has to be the right tool for the right job that should make our decisions rather than some personal attachment or 'cultural' trend.

    Interesting to here the different features and experiences of these other tools in this thread though.

    PS: Every January they do a special offer and sell it half price (from the 1st - 15th Jan I believe) if you buy it then all upgrades are half price. This is a personal license not a corporate one.
  34. NB vs. Eclipse[ Go to top ]

    Just so ye know it, I'm following this discussion quite closely. I've been using NB 3.6 for about half a year, building a rather complex web-application. I haven't tried Eclipse.

    NB suits my needs for functionality at most times. All those L&F quirks don't bother me. Best thing about it is that it's light (runs smoothly with 512MB ram), although some times the in-code error annotation really slows it down, and that's a real pain. Another note is lack of refactoring (yesterday I had to change a package name around 300 places).

    Hopefully those issues will be solved with version 4. I would convert to Eclipse if someone told me it's almost just as light as NB, easy to get into and better to design web-apps in.
  35. NB vs. Eclipse[ Go to top ]

    Well, my installation of NB 4 gets a NPE each time I try to open a JSP file.

    Sorda renders it a bit useless in my eyes, then. Hope it works for you guys..
  36. NB vs. Eclipse[ Go to top ]

    And just for the sake of it, I just tried to install Eclipse 3.0 and got "An error has occurred. See the log file..".

    Back to good old 3.6 it is!
  37. Huh?[ Go to top ]

    Hope this helps.
    It does indeed, and it's a breath of fresh air in this thread. Thanks.
  38. Huh?[ Go to top ]

    -Eclipse editor text is smoothed while NetBeans text is both small and totally unsmoothed :(
    This is a very annoying default option that the NB guys chose to leave off!
    This just gives people a bad first impression... Go to the editor options menu (yes I know its confusing and huge) and select text antialiasing. Fonts will look OK. To make them larger run the ide with the -fontsize option.

    NB has quite a few issues left, but these are mostly cosmetic rather than technical. Most of the stuff has workarounds so I can live with it the way it is. I'm really not to crazy over Eclipse and I don't think intelliJ provides enough of an incentive for me to switch over.

    I pretty much agree with you, there are several very reasonable Java IDE's and two powerful open source solutions. Eclipse offers advantages to some and NB offers advantages to others, both are decent products with plenty of room for improvement.
  39. Text smoothing...[ Go to top ]

    -Eclipse editor text is smoothed while NetBeans text is both small and totally unsmoothed :(
    This is a very annoying default option that the NB guys chose to leave off!This just gives people a bad first impression... Go to the editor options menu (yes I know its confusing and huge) and select text antialiasing. Fonts will look OK. To make them larger run the ide with the -fontsize option.
    I normally modify the default font size. I just think they should choose a more sensible default. The antialiasing renders some text very blurred or smudged. Certain characters seem particularly bad. Hopefully this is a JDK issue which will be resolved.
  40. Huh?[ Go to top ]

    -Eclipse editor text is smoothed while NetBeans text is both small and totally unsmoothed :(
    This is a very annoying default option that the NB guys chose to leave off!This just gives people a bad first impression... Go to the editor options menu (yes I know its confusing and huge) and select text antialiasing. Fonts will look OK. To make them larger run the ide with the -fontsize option.NB has quite a few issues left, but these are mostly cosmetic rather than technical. Most of the stuff has workarounds so I can live with it the way it is. I'm really not to crazy over Eclipse and I don't think intelliJ provides enough of an incentive for me to switch over.I pretty much agree with you, there are several very reasonable Java IDE's and two powerful open source solutions. Eclipse offers advantages to some and NB offers advantages to others, both are decent products with plenty of room for improvement.
    I actually like it. Text smoothing on smaller fonts doesn't look very good. I have found that netbeans has a lot of good features that are not well documented.

    For isntance did you know you can autogenerate BeanInfo classes for beans? Not very obvious, but expand a class node, and then right click on the "Bean Patterns" node. You can also add listener support from there, pretty handy.

    I think that netbeans has been getting consistantly faster over time, while I feel like eclipse is getting a bit more bogged down. Don't get me wrong I love both, and I use them both, but there are some really excellent features in netbeans I think people ignore.

    Oh and the ctrl-k / ctrl-l autocompletes are a godsend.
      .adam
  41. Now I KNOW you are using an old JDK![ Go to top ]

    It's cool to have all these new features but I still can'tget past the L&F of the tool. Here's a list of things that are just not quite right to me:-The windows L&F. Is it me or this "Windows" L&F circa 1998?
    Now I KNOW you are using an old JDK. You need at the very least JDK1.4.2 to get the XP L&F. I would recommend the JDK5.0beta2 for a very responsive UI.
  42. Now I KNOW you are using an old JDK![ Go to top ]

    Nope... I'm using 1.4.2. I can try using 1.5b60 instead and see what that
    does. I guess it is fair to note that I wasn't on an XP box (win2k) while using
    NB so getting that XP L&F is gonna be tough ;-) Have to check it out on an XP
    machine and see if it looks nicer.
  43. Choice is always a good thing but I don't see why anyone would choose to use netbeans at this point other than to maybe 1) mockup a GUI in swing.2) use the profiler.3) write a J2ME app.
    Although most of the time I use Eclipse, I acknowledge Netbeans has it's place *right now* into my toolbox:

    1) Out of the box XML support.
    2) Decent JSP debugging
    3) Servlet 2.4/JSP 2.0 support
    4) TCP/IP monitor

    It's possible to have those things in Eclipse thanks to products like MyEclipse or the IBM's contibution to the Eclipse's web tools project, but then, Eclipse is a memory and CPU hog as NetBeans.
  44. Netbeans Sucks[ Go to top ]

    Man is this thing ever going to die? Give it a rest already... I couldn't even figure out how to build libraries in the last one, that is, assuming you could do it.

    It's so far behind the curve, why would anyone bother?
  45. Netbeans Sucks[ Go to top ]

    Man is this thing ever going to die? Give it a rest already... I couldn't even figure out how to build libraries in the last one, that is, assuming you could do it.It's so far behind the curve, why would anyone bother?
    People I work with tried to figure out what plugin you used to work with JSP code in Eclipse and couldn't find one that was anywhere close to Netbeans over 2 years ago.

    Eclipse is so far behind the Web Applicaiton curve, it's so evident that they aren't bothering to catch up with that space.

    It works both ways, you see.

    FWIW, I've built libraries in Netbeans 3.5 and 3.6 without issue.

    All I use Eclipse for is an Oracle query tool plug in because I can't use TOAD at my place of business. And it's really annoying to load all of that bloat to use that feature.

    http://www.netbeans.org/download/misc/feature-matrix.pdf
  46. Netbeans Sucks[ Go to top ]

    Eclipse has better J2EE support than netBeans has, with the free plugin Lomboz (I compared it with Netbeans 3.6). It let you develop EJB, webservices, JSP's and webservices and makes debugging and hot deployment of most application servers work. I tried to work with netbeans 3.6 for a month, because the other developers of the team used it. It was one big nightmare: no refactoring, no source optimazation functions and so on.
  47. Netbeans Sucks[ Go to top ]

    Eclipse has better J2EE support than netBeans has, with the free plugin Lomboz (I compared it with Netbeans 3.6). It let you develop EJB, webservices, JSP's and webservices and makes debugging and hot deployment of most application servers work. I tried to work with netbeans 3.6 for a month, because the other developers of the team used it. It was one big nightmare: no refactoring, no source optimazation functions and so on.
    I'm sorry, I disagree.

    Lomboz is a plugin. Eclipse didn't work straight out of the box 2 years ago.

    Netbeans and it flows much better IMHO for the work that I need to do.

    Eclipse has been playing catchup ever since.
  48. You haven't tried the latest version[ Go to top ]

    Man is this thing ever going to die? Give it a rest already... I couldn't even figure out how to build libraries in the last one, that is, assuming you could do it.It's so far behind the curve, why would anyone bother?
    You haven't tried the latest version. If you had you wouldn't be posting comments like this.
  49. I use it exclusivly for web applications and it works well. On my machine eclipse takes just a long to load and really isn't faster under normal usage. Also, I prefer the Netbeans interface to eclipses.

    I really like the ANT based build system that allows me to do all my stuff entirely outside of the IDE if I choose.

    Anyway, this is not a pissing contest people. If you don't like it, don't use it.

    Choices are good, and this is a nice IDE that I'll be using for some time to come.
  50. Editor Abbreviation[ Go to top ]

    Another thing that a prefer about NetBeans is editor abbreviations.
    The nearest equivalent in Eclipse (templates) is annoying to use in a hurry. I have to type ctrl+space and then select a template from a list. In NetBeans I can use any abbreviation e.g. sout for System.out.println(" an the result appears immediately - no special keys to press or lists to scroll through. The only advantage that Eclipse templates has is allowing you to "tab" between different parts of template.
  51. No where near....[ Go to top ]

    All these open source IDE's really get under my skin. You would think, a multi-million $$$ company (Sun) would come up with a decent IDE, and not keep on throwing away money at this netbeans something or other. No wonder they are having record loses. Java is not going to last in the enterprise if they keep on coming up with things like Java Studio Creator and Sun One Studio - "built on the Netbeans platform".

    Microsoft have come to the party with VS.net, a really intuitive development environment. Ok, I know what going to say... java is not vb or c#, so then lets take a closer look at home, Borland JBuilder and Intellij are two really great IDE's, even the look and feel is great. They are not even the mother company of Java... but yet they are getting it right. Imagine a company came up with a better IDE for vb or c# than Microsoft... it would be blasted all over the media, but yet Sun gets away with it. Sun needs to throw away netbeans and get those lazy ass computer scientists put something together that is at least professional... maybe then they will start making some profit.
  52. Features Lack... Eclipse.[ Go to top ]

    I am using Eclipse :( but I am a gr8 fan of NB. I have NB at my home and in free time I code in NB only.
    However I don't know very much Eclipse but following are the features lack I found with Eclipse:-

    1. No ctrl+k / ctrl+l facility.
    2. No triple click facility.
    3. If I search something (say, any variable) in the editor. It's occurance is shown. But if I put the cursor on some other text and then press ctrl+k, it starts showing second words occurance.
    4. It's mark occurance facility doesn't mark keywords.
    5. IT IS SLOWWWWW, heavily show. Only startup time is less as compared to NB.

    Sanjeev