Confluence 1.2 Released: Knowledge Management Gets Practical

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News: Confluence 1.2 Released: Knowledge Management Gets Practical

  1. Atlassian has announced the release of Confluence 1.2 - the professional wiki. Confluence 1.2 features an enhanced search interface, new ways to explore the content of spaces, threaded comments, image thumbnails and galleries, a new permissions interface, and a raft of additional improvements and bug fixes.

    Find out more here about Confluence here.
    Read the full release notes here.

    About Confluence
    Confluence - The Professional Wiki, is a knowledge management tool designed to make it easy for a team to share information with each other, and with the world.
  2. I am pleased to hear there is a stable release of this product.

    I have been using Confluence on Codehaus, within the company I work for, and on various consulting engagements. The biggest benefits over a vanilla wiki is unparallelled usability, permission and search capabilities, export and integration with other tools.

    The teams I have been on that are using Confluence have really improved the way information is shared, because this tool also appeals to non-techies. In fact, it is so good that several companies I know of are now making it their knowledge management platform of choice.

    Aslak
  3. I have been playing a Confluence demo version and I found it simple and powerful ! I could write a entire book with this tool ;)

    But unluckily, the company I work for is still using an "enterprise" platform :

    Lotus Notes

    :|
  4. We use Confluence and Jira at the Open Source Lab. We've gotten enormously positive response about both from internal users at the OSL, users in the Open Source community, and business and education communities that we work with.

    In fact, Confluence and Jira are the only two applications we have running that violate my "eat your own dog food" policy about Open Source.

    Well done Atlassian.

    Jason McKerr
    The Open Source Lab
  5. It's great to see the wiki concept becoming more suitable for corporate use. It has all the benefits of standard document management systems, such as version and access control, while encouraging collaboration so much more effectively.

    As was commented in the recent spring thread, some companies just won't purchase something unless they have to put up $$$ for it. Which has traditionally been a problem for corporate adoption of wikis, as most are free. So thankyou Atlassian for releasing a product that can be "cost-justified", while keeping it free for open-source projects and non-profits. The fact that the money is actually well-spent on a superior product is icing on the cake.
  6. Congrats to atlassian for the 1.2 release of Confluence, but Jason, I believe you could try to not violate your rule by looking at open-source Wikis like XWiki or SnipSnap.

    I'd be glad to help you do that and show you the even more advanced features of XWiki compared to Confluence.

    Disclaimer: I'm the author of XWiki.
  7. Ludovic,

    Any Open Source project can use Confluence for free. Codehaus and Spring teams are using it (great content, BTW).

    Beside this, XWiki (looks pretty good) open source license is GPL, and AFAIK if I want to use GPL licensed stuff to make money I need to pay for it too, so...
  8. Rodolfo,

    Thanks for the nice comment on XWiki.

    I do know that Confluence and Jira are available for open-source projects and this is indeed a great way by atlassian to give back to the open-source community but as well to advertise the product ! However it doesn't make confluence an open-source product.

    A Wiki is a end-user tool so the GPL license allows to use it in many circumstances. What the GPL could prohibit is bundling with non GPL software and AFAIK the only bundle like that would be with a portal server and this is something XWIki supports (with eXo) but not Confluence.

    Finally, open-source is not about being free (I'm working on paying support packages for XWiki) but about opening the source.

    Ludovic
  9. Rodolfo,Thanks for the nice comment on XWiki.
    Thank you for your great job ! I will download XWiki too ;)
    I do know that Confluence and Jira are available for open-source projects and this is indeed a great way by atlassian to give back to the open-source community but as well to advertise the product !
    I call it a "really brilliant strategy", don´t you think ?
    Finally, open-source is not about being free (I'm working on paying support packages for XWiki) but about opening the source.
    I agree, I am starting to realize this.

    But according to http://www.atlassian.com/software/confluence/pricing.jsp, if you buy a commercial license, you can take the source code.

    My point is : they have a solid reputation in Open Source field : Webwork (they improve Rickard work), SiteMesh, Quartz, etc. They are even using another OSS great project : Spring. So, I don´t want to speculate, but IMO they just wanted a viable way to make some money. What´s the problem here ?

    Rgds
  10. Rodolfo,

    I agree, Atlassian has a great strategy by getting known through the open-source projects.

    True that if you buy the product you get the source, but that's not opening the source to the world and building a community. It is similar to the Microsoft Shared Source initiative.. On this subject, I'll let you read the article on the OSI web site if you are interested to learn the difference.

    And I don't think there is a problem with Atlassian and Confluence. I do respect them a lot and Confluence is a great product too. It's good for the professional Wikis to have good competitors open-source or not.

    I was just replying to Jason that was saying that the were not eating their own dog food by using Confluence to tell him that I believe there is an alternative to do so, not at all to say that Confluence shouldn't be considered because it is not open-source. This is not what I meant.

    Ludovic