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Performance and scalability: Performance on different browser/OS combination

  1. Performance on different browser/OS combination (3 messages)

    Hi, we are taking performance timings on server with different OS / browser combination.

    For Win XP-IE, Win XP-Netscape and Linux Mozilla combination the timings are almost same. But with Mac OS-IE combination the timings on server side increases more then 10 times.

    Does the browser have any effect on timings that are taken on server using System.currentTimeMillis()

    The server is weblogic and the views are JSPs

    Thanks.
  2. I say your mac machine as a very bad tcp/ip stack performance.
    Obviously, the browser has no impact on the server routines, except for data transfer. If you don't mesure the time the server is waiting for client, the server is probably fine. Maybe there are retransmits, packet loss, suboptimal tcp message window size (like 576 for modem instead of 1494 for ethernet), packet fragmentation. Could get much worse if SSL traffic: bad ssl negotiations with macs?

    Good luck.
  3. with a good java profiler, you should highlight easily if time is lost in your app or if it is in the i/o layer.
  4. But with Mac OS-IE combination the timings on server side increases more then 10 times. Does the browser have any effect on timings that are taken on server using System.currentTimeMillis()The server is weblogic and the views are JSPsThanks.
    The most simple way to discover why the browser in Mac OS has such a poor perfomance, is to use a network protocol analyzer (a sniffer) such as Ethereal. You can download Ethereal here (the product has GNU License, so you don't have to pay an euro for it):

    http://www.ethereal.com/


    By the way, maybe the problem with the browser is the way it manages the cache of downloaded files. We have a lot of performance problems with MSIE in Windows 2000, when using XML and XSL files, and all the problems are related with the cache managing algoritm. It looks like MSIE tries to check all the time if there are new files; this simple operation implies sending small packets of verifications all the time, and the sum of this packets is very significant with low bandwidth networks such as ISDN networks.


    Jose R. Huerga
    http://www.terra.es/personal/jrhuerga