CORBA in a loosely coupled world

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News: CORBA in a loosely coupled world

  1. CORBA in a loosely coupled world (5 messages)

    "CORBA bindings for WSDL are key to allowing existing, deployed CORBA applications to continue to work in a web services world." These are the words of Steve Vinoski of Iona. CORBA has WSDL bindings now, and Steve talks about how you can use them.
    The typical way to integrate existing systems like CORBA with newer approaches like web services is not to integrate at the edges — within the consumers and services themselves — but rather to deploy gateways, bridges, or centralized intermediaries. Unfortunately, any approach to web services integration that requires the use of gateways or web service front ends just adds complexity to an already complex system. The use of gateways requires the deployment of new and often expensive hardware, creates new intermediary processes to manage, more network hops to cross, and more data conversions that reduce performance. The end result: added cost, more complexity, and slow services that don't deliver for the enterprise.

    CORBA bindings for WSDL allow a CORBA object interface to be described in the logical part of the WSDL description, and allow the object's communication mechanisms to be described in a binding definition that forms part of the physical part of the WSDL description. Communications with the object therefore go over whatever protocols and transports the object's interoperable object reference (IOR) specifies (typically IIOP). As a result, existing deployed CORBA applications can operate, untouched and without bridges or gateways, as part of a larger web services integration. Note that this does not mean, however, that consuming applications must be aware of CORBA. Service consumers are WSDL-based applications, not CORBA applications. They know and depend on only the logical contract, and WSDL abstractions along with the appropriate middleware isolate them completely from the underlying CORBA communications infrastructure.

    While it is true that not all aspects of all CORBA object definitions can be seamlessly redefined in WSDL, many CORBA objects in practice are quite compatible with WSDL. Redefining these in WSDL, thereby making all of these mission-critical CORBA applications available to the rest of the loosely coupled enterprise, is well worth it.
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  2. Now this is what SOA is all about...[ Go to top ]

    Great article. Service consumption should be just about user interaction and/or composite service production, not about plumbing, and definitely should not care about how the service is implemented or reached. I covered some of this in an article I wrote for BEA called SOA Much More than Web Services
  3. ...definitely should not care about how the service is implemented or reached.
    Nope, we should care about efficient reach (wire etc.) and implementation.
    Boogie and trolley and car are about the same from 'high theoretical perspective': get in- wait - get out, ant outcome is the same: we came to our destination. But something is different about them….
  4. What I was getting at was that the producers and consumers of services should not care about the wire function. The producer just provides the backend functionality, the consumer the UI. A "platform", ESB, or other mechanism should take care of the plumbing.
  5. Where are the bindings?[ Go to top ]

    The message says "CORBA has WSDL bindings now". Where are they, all I can find is a request for proposals for wsdl bindings for corba.
  6. Where are the bindings?[ Go to top ]

    The message says "CORBA has WSDL bindings now". Where are they, all I can find is a request for proposals for wsdl bindings for corba.
    The binding is not yet available and the proposal is at the Request For Comments (RFC) stage bypassing RFP. It would probably take a few months before it becomes a standard with OMG.