J2EE and "Profile-based" MVC...

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Web tier: servlets, JSP, Web frameworks: J2EE and "Profile-based" MVC...

  1. J2EE and "Profile-based" MVC... (3 messages)

    Hi folks,

    I'm writing to share ideas with you, and maybe find people to help me push a concept forward...

    I'll try to be as concise and clear as possible, to present things quickly here and let you browse existing resources to keep my post a bit short.

    All my story is, in a few words, about presenting "customized pages" to end-users (I'm talking about HTML pages of course) depending on their "role", "group", or whatever else...

    As a matter of fact, many of you may remember an application that included the infamous "login page", and where specific pages had to be presented for users of different "nature"...

    Well, I looked for something cool on the web to do so a few years ago, but nothing existed yet (or I did not find it).
    Some ideas from great people (through the CorbaWeb project) came on top of this, and I started thinking about a framework to do this...

    'JWebViews' was born.

    It's a frawemork built on top of the servlet API that allows to display customized pages for some "profiles" and some "target objects".
    In a few words, this allows to assign "actions" (some controllers that are invoked by the framework on the behalf of user interactions) to some "objects" and some "profiles". Of course, the "profiles" represent you application's users, roles, etc.

    This allows to define profiled views of your model's objects...

    Describing all this short is quite hard actually, so don't hesitate to read the framework documentation there :
    http://www.rvkb.com/jwebviews/doc/Framework/index.html

    I've been using this "home-made" framework in several applications (even other developers did ! :-) ), and it revealed very efficient. I think it's much simpler than struts (actually because it has no such taglib and tools... but it keeps the MVC principle which is always good IMHO) but lets you do very powerful things when it comes to designing multi-profile web applications.

    With JWebViews, not only the code has a place, but it has a place for each profile !

    If you'd like to react, don't hesistate ! I'm looking for people to push this concept forward.
    I think this concept of executing UI code for objects and profiles is quite interesting...

    Also, some points in the framework are still to be investigated (JAAS-based auth., action linking, tools, ... so many things actually :-) ) to make it even more cool !

    Well, enjoy it :-)

    Cheers

    Remi
  2. J2EE and "Profile-based" MVC...[ Go to top ]

    Dear Remi:
       I've read your post and taken a look at the framework's documentation; I find it indeed interesting.
       I'm actually working on a big project for a Telco, and we use a similar approach. We use a hierarchy of security objects; users and/or profiles are assigned permissions on those objects, and menu items an other concepts are assigned to security objects.
       I wonder why you restrained it to webapps; I figure it could very well be used for desktop apps too.
       I'd like to further discuss this with you, and get involved in the project if it's possible. Do you have an email to keep in touch?

    Regards,
    Martin
  3. J2EE and "Profile-based" MVC...[ Go to top ]

    Hi Martin,

    You are absolutely right : the approach actually works for desktop apps too. They even had such a "proto" in a research lab I worked before (www.lifl.fr) !
    I can't say a lot because I don't know your expectations but basically the thing was about displaying profiled JPanels for CORBA objects (as y'ouve seen in JWebViews we display profiled HTML code for Java objects, but conceptually there is no big difference !).

    Well, it would be a real pleasure to share all this and get your experience so don't hesitate to email me (remi at rvkb dot com) !

    Cheers

    Remi
  4. Please don't continue this thread.
    Follow-up in "J2EE patterns", thread "Profile-based" MVC applications.

    Sorry for the inconvenience !

    Cheers

    Remi