J2EE puts the smarts in Adobe Intelligent Documents

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News: J2EE puts the smarts in Adobe Intelligent Documents

  1. Adobe's combination of PDF, XML and productive use of J2EE, creates Intelligent Documents that can dynamically interact with core applications and integrate people into business processes. This article describes a joint solution by Adobe and IBM that enables interprises to communicate more effectively, automate document-based processes, access systems offline, and share information securely.

    Read Extending the IBM WebSphere Platform with Adobe Intelligent Documents

    Threaded Messages (19)

  2. It is Enterprises not Interprises.
  3. Cocoon[ Go to top ]

    Been doing this for 4 years already with Cocoon. And the "intellgents" can come from anywhere, J2EE, Web Services, POJO, Rule Engines, other HTMLs, files, etc...
  4. Adobe's Lifecycle series of products and other server-side integration technologies are very interesting since they help bridge the document and data processing worlds. They are available to a broad set of J2EE developers on both WebSphere and JBoss. http://www.adobe.com/products/server/procmgmt.html for the overview and http://www.adobe.com/products/server/formserver/systemreqs.html for sample system requirements.


    Bob Bickel
    JBoss
  5. A few comments[ Go to top ]

    Adobe PDF has its own place and I can see the value of using the new XDP format that they are coming out with. One of the key areas that interests me is the ability to attach XML Schemas to the XDP Format and extract the XML Data from it after the user has populated/filled out the form.

    I appreciate Adobe's intention to publishes all these standards at their site. But what I would be more interested is the following:

    1) When is Adobe going to come out with a Java API that lets me manipulate the XDP format. By manipulation -- I mean merging the Form Template with Data, extracting out the data, etc. This is very important if you want the likes of developers to try out and see the power for themselves. A simple question I would like to ask Adobe/JBoss or proponents of this approach is: I have the Java SDK and I have Tomcat server and ofcourse the Free PDF Reader -- can I do anything or try out anything ?

    2) I am not concerned with thrusting heavy duty servers like WebSphere/JBoss and a plethora of Adobe Tools/Servers to evaluate out this approach. All I need is a simple Java API. Unless you give me a Java API -- this approach is not lightweight and I will be quite willing to explore the possibility of understanding the XDP set of specs and hacking out an OSS API myself.

    When you publish articles like this -- atleast mention links to evaluation copies that one can try out. And lastly Intelligence in Documents has got nothing to do with J2EE. So do not confuse the two issues.
  6. A few comments[ Go to top ]

    Adobe PDF has its own place and I can see the value of using the new XDP format that they are coming out with. One of the key areas that interests me is the ability to attach XML Schemas to the XDP Format and extract the XML Data from it after the user has populated/filled out the form. I appreciate Adobe's intention to publishes all these standards at their site. But what I would be more interested is the following:1) When is Adobe going to come out with a Java API that lets me manipulate the XDP format. By manipulation -- I mean merging the Form Template with Data, extracting out the data, etc. This is very important if you want the likes of developers to try out and see the power for themselves. A simple question I would like to ask Adobe/JBoss or proponents of this approach is: I have the Java SDK and I have Tomcat server and ofcourse the Free PDF Reader -- can I do anything or try out anything ? 2) I am not concerned with thrusting heavy duty servers like WebSphere/JBoss and a plethora of Adobe Tools/Servers to evaluate out this approach. All I need is a simple Java API. Unless you give me a Java API -- this approach is not lightweight and I will be quite willing to explore the possibility of understanding the XDP set of specs and hacking out an OSS API myself.When you publish articles like this -- atleast mention links to evaluation copies that one can try out. And lastly Intelligence in Documents has got nothing to do with J2EE. So do not confuse the two issues.


    http://www.pdfbox.org is an open source Java API that has the capability of exporting/importing form field data.

    Ben
  7. Requirements[ Go to top ]

    Some of the above comments simply demonstrate the difficulty of trying out a simple prototype using a combination of heavy-weight Adobe/IBM Servers. I guess their target is not to impress upon developers like us but to garner those mega-million bucks in consulting fees that will make the engine come to life.

    Ben -- thanks for the link -- I will surely look it up. It the API you mentions works -- it will solve a major part of some of the initiatives I am looking into. All I want to do is use/manipulate the PDF format programmatically using a light-weight API.

    Could you or some other reader also list down some several Java APIs in the OSS domain that deal with PDF. iText is one too. This list could be helpful to quite a few of us.

    TIA
    Romin.
  8. Requirements[ Go to top ]

    Could you or some other reader also list down some several Java APIs in the OSS domain that deal with PDF. iText is one too. This list could be helpful to quite a few of us.TIARomin.
    If you can afford creating forms yourself then http://jasperreports.sourceforge.net/ is a great tool for populating forms with data and generating PDFs and other formats.

    IReport is a good tool for creating Jasper templates http://ireport.sourceforge.net/cap3.html
  9. Requirements[ Go to top ]

    Could you or some other reader also list down some several Java APIs in the OSS domain that deal with PDF. iText is one too. This list could be helpful to quite a few of us.TIARomin.

    check these out:

    * iText and iTextPDF

    * RetepPDF

    * PJX

    * jPedal

    * innoPDF
  10. Thanks for the libraries. While most of these libraries are useful for generating PDFs, I was looking more at the following:

    a) Take a PDF Form and populate the fields accordingly via XML data that comes in -- something which the Adobe Form Server claims to do but I dont want to use that due to all its servers and high license costs. That way I can design a PDF form and make use of all the validation, auto-computation of fields etc which the Adobe Form Designer supports.

    b) Submit the data from the Form as XML or even submit the PDF form as it is and then extract out the Data from it accordingly.

    Any OSS libraries in Java allow me to do the above?

    Thanks.
  11. Thanks for the libraries. While most of these libraries are useful for generating PDFs, I was looking more at the following:a) Take a PDF Form and populate the fields accordingly via XML data that comes in -- something which the Adobe Form Server claims to do but I dont want to use that due to all its servers and high license costs. That way I can design a PDF form and make use of all the validation, auto-computation of fields etc which the Adobe Form Designer supports.

    Commercial, but cost less than Adobe stuff http://big.faceless.org/products/pdf/index.jsp we use it to populate PDF forms created with Acrobat.
  12. Adobe Forms[ Go to top ]

    If you don't want to use the FormServer you could use a WSDL. However in order to do this the client would need to have full Acrobat on thier desktop or you would need another Adobe Server product. Adobe Reader Extensions Server. I'm not sure what the cost comparision would be.

    ARES allows users to use the free Reader to interact with PDF forms. You can turn on features that are normally only found in the full reader. This is dne within the PDF and is tranparent to the user. Things like Saving the form off line, using a WSDlL to import or export form Data.

    HTH
  13. Another commercial library available to populate PDF forms data is jPDFFields by Qoppa Software http://www.theserverside.com/news/reply.tss?message_id=150742
  14. Sorry... wrong post. Here is the correct link to jPDFFields by Qoppa Software jPDFFields
  15. What is XDP[ Go to top ]

    Hi Romin

    Just a little information regarding XDP. When used with FormServer there is a Java API that allows you to insert, extract, protect flatten etc. a PDF/XDP. THere are 5 moduals that ship with Form Server. They are the PDF manipulation.war, DataManagerService.war, XMLform.War, Processmanager.war and FontManager.war all of which are documented. So in a nutshell you can do anythiny you want with a PDF/XDP. From a designer perspective you can deploy an XDP as a PDF or a XDP. The XDP would be used in a FOrm Server environment and PDF would be for Stand alone PDF's.

    BTW, the designer allows you to add a WS within the PDF add logic using JavaScript or Form Calc.


    HTH
  16. Read a good explanation for both intelligent and dynamic documents on this site: SmartDoc Technologies - intelligent and dynamic document solutions
  17. System requirements
    Adobe LiveCycle Forms

        * 2 Intel 3.0 GHz CPUs with 2 gigabytes RAM. Actual requirements will be based upon your particular form processing requirements.

    Hmm, sounds like too much for something as simple as merging forms and data.
  18. Complementary approaches[ Go to top ]

    The solution described in the article is similar to W3C's XForms and also Microsoft's Infopath, in that the form data can be captured as XML. See a comparison of XForms and Infopath.

    The solution is PDF centric, and the document is primarily a container for the form data (though i don't mean to say you can't also use other features available in acrobat reader).

    For more document-oriented problems, eg where the users also need the full editing power of Microsoft Word, a system such as SpeedLegal's SmartPrecedent server may be attractive. This takes arbitrary XML documents and transforms them to HTML, PDF, RTF etc. It runs in tomcat, websphere, and weblogic.

    Jason Harrop
    CTO
    SpeedLegal
  19. InfoJet Service for InfoPath[ Go to top ]

    InfoJet Service is a Java class library to publish InfoPath Forms to the Web. InfoJet Service can be deployed as Web Services. J2EE and .Net Web application with integration of InfoJet Service support the users to edit InfoPath Forms in Internet Explorer and FireFox.

    http://www.infojetsoft.com
  20. Hi
    Does Adobe provide a Free or at the very least a Trial Version of Java Api that I can use. This is to generate PDF files, change them add data to them and things like that.
    Is there any other reliable third party API that I can check out it has to be available atleast as a Trial version
    Cheers
    Sunny