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News: JSourcery Javadoc/Source Code Website Announced

  1. JSourcery Javadoc/Source Code Website Announced (24 messages)

    The JSourcery website exists to provide Java developers with a resource for quick access to Open Source Java APIs and their associated source code.

    Several websites already provide access to Javadoc API references, but the real value in JSourcery is embedded [Source] links. Each class, method, and member reference contains a [Source] hyperlink which maps to the corresponding class, method, or member in an HTML version of the source code. Further, every class, method, or member reference in the source HTML is hyperlinked to where it was declared. Hence, it is possible to trace program execution by clicking through the HTML links.

    Currently, JSourcery contains Apache and SourceForge projects and Sun's J2SE 1.4.2, but more will be posted in the future.

    Here is a link to the SourceForge Azureus (Bit Torrent client) API Javadocs and here is a link to the source of an Azureus source file, MainWindow.

    JSourcery is a new website and can benefit from your feedback. If you have questions, comments, or requests for APIs you would like to see on the website, please contact us at support@jsourcery.com

    Threaded Messages (24)

  2. This is indeed a more useful site than JDocs.com and predict will kill Jdocs.com. I've always thought JDocs.com sucks.
    Well done guys, I'll bookmark your site for frequent use.
  3. Far from JDocs[ Go to top ]

    Nice work indeed. The source code idea is fine.

    I just don't see (previous post) how it beats JDocs which has 2 major features: comments from community in the docs and searchability (which is not as simple problem as it looks like).
  4. Looks nice, but I am not sure why bother? I do not see much value in browsing of sources in browser. IDE allows seeing Javadocs and jumping to source code of libraries. At least Intellij-IDEA does it perfectly IMO (including various usage reports).
    Therefore Jdoc.com user API comments are much more valuable.
  5. Seen source code in javadoc is helpfull if :
    * you want to take a look at how a method/class is implemented or how configuration take effect,
    * you want to take a look a test unit sample (if included/linked), tests are documentation
    * you want to take a look at the developper coding style,...

    Without download the source/devel dist, and browse it with your filemanager or configure your IDE.
  6. :* you want to take a look at how a method/class is implemented or how configuration take effect,
    For a fairly advanced project it is not that simple and usually requires extensive method usage and implementation searches, especially with IoC and runtime implementation registrations.
    For a simple project it should be kind of obvious.

    >>* you want to take a look a test unit sample (if included/linked), tests are documentation
    agreed

    >>* you want to take a look at the developper coding style,...Without download the source/devel dist, and browse it with your filemanager or configure your IDE.

    Maybe for someone, but it does not fit my habit:
    - firstly I look at project features and few samples;
    - secondly I download project and look at the examples, at this time I already have project on my machine and have IDE configured to access Javadocs and sources;
  7. +1
    Seems like a solution in search of a problem...

    Regards,
    Nikita.
  8. Seen source code in javadoc is helpfull if :<br>* you want to take a look at how a method/class is implemented or how configuration take effect,<br>* you want to take a look a test unit sample (if included/linked), tests are documentation<br>* you want to take a look at the developper coding style,...Without download the source/devel dist, and browse it with your filemanager or configure your IDE.

    * Exception is raised in some package of product you use. In my experience in 80% cases the bug is in my code and in 20% cases the bug is in package I use, but in any case I have to take a look at package source.

    Nebojsa
  9. J2SE docs[ Go to top ]

    contains [docs for] Sun's J2SE 1.4.2

    I take it you like getting polite letters from Sun's legal department?
  10. Are there tools available to do the same to our own code without the use of Maven? I've played with Java2HTML, but it won't build an actual coherant web site, just pretty print source code.
  11. Javadoc + source with ant[ Go to top ]

    I combine Java2HTML (patched) and a Taglet to link htmlized java and javadoc. And it work pretty well, take a look at :
    http://my-lib.sourceforge.net/api/my/yaep/files/FilePurge.html

    The taglet overload the @version tag to append link to sources file (original and tests).

    The combinaison done in build.xml
  12. Is there any feature or location where we can download the source and include it in my eclipse project for debugging purposes.
  13. search?[ Go to top ]

    And what about JDOC's features like search and comments?

    Dmitry
    http://www.servletsuite.com
  14. It's -linksource. They don't use it on the browsable docs because the library writers think their documentation is adequate (ha, ha, ha). It also makes the download much bigger, but IMHO, they should offer it as an option.
  15. Thanks for the feedback[ Go to top ]

    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for the valuable feedback. I had expected a mixed bag of comments. Allow me to address some concerns.

    First of all, jsourcery.com is certainly a work in progress. The truth is I simply wanted to make it available sooner than later and depending on the feedback I would keep working on it. Thus far, the response had been quite positive, so I am still motivated.

    Many people have compared jsourcery.com to the jdocs.com web site. It seems to me that jdocs.com is purely for Javadocs API discussion, whereas the jsourcery.com web site targets actual API implementation (ie the source code). I had not originally intended using Javadocs at all, but evidently its a good interface for accessing the code. At the moment, jsourcery.com is fairly vanilla and simply serves static HTML. However, I would like to think the web site is in its infancy and will evolve into a resource for discussion of open source libraries. Further, I am quite open to implementing any features that people think might enhance the JSourcery experience (including a discussion forum/notes for API similar to jdocs.com).

    I am aware of Sun requesting jdocs.com to remove the J2SE Javadocs. If and when they contact me, it will be removed. However, I will be disappointed to get such an email seeing that I believe having an HTML version of the code available on the web is a valuable resource.

    A few people have mentioned using Maven, Java2HTML, or the -linksource javadoc option to produce the same results as found on jsourcery.com. As far as I know, none of these software tools allows developers to produce HTML with the same embedded links as JSourcery. I hope I am not wrong about that - otherwise I have wasted a lot of time developing the software to generate the HTML! :) Please let me know if thats the case.


    Some people have suggested that there is little value in the jsourcery.com web site because you can get similar results from an IDE. I agree with this opinion to some extent. In the case that a developer has already decided to include a particular API in a project, it would be easier to use the IDE interface. However, I was partly inspired to create jsourcery.com because there were many time in which I wanted to browse open source source code, but did not necessarily want to download the API. In any case, I suggest a developer use whatever means is most convenient at the time.

    Dmitry Namiot, there is a search feature, but it is not implemented very well at the moment. At the top and bottom of each source code page there is a search feature. Its a service provided by the hosting provider and is not implemented very well. It is something that will be addressed in the future.

    Once again, thanks for the great feedback.
    Rob
  16. sorry....
    i dont see why to go to this website. it offers nothing.
  17. Guys, I'm sorry to low down a bit the volume of "It rocks!" responses, but the only
    value I see in resources like JSourcery/JDocs is keeping an eye on available frameworks,
    nothing more. I always have all required libraries locally with their sources and javadocs
    (updated on the same day the new version is available) so that jumping to any of them
    is a matter of keyboard shortcut in IDEA :) In addition, I don't have to see Google ads
    in the middle of the source or wait for the site response. Seriously, I just don't get
    all this "wow" about bunch of outdated sources and javadocs (JDocs provides javadocs
    for Spring 1.0.2 and JSourcery provides sources for Java 1.4.2_04) available on-line ...
  18. Oh, I see Rob has already addressed some of my points. Well, if it's easier for you to develop and maintain such a resource (than download the source bundle) + keep many other people happy - then why not, of course ..
  19. Value?[ Go to top ]

    I don't see the value. Why would anyone consider using an OS project without downloading the source of the version they are using? If I'm going to be checking the source, chances are, I'm going to be modifying it.
  20. Value?[ Go to top ]

    I don't see the value. Why would anyone consider using an OS project without downloading the source of the version they are using?

    I think Rob should be commended on the work he has done on this project. If you don't see the value, then just don't use it. I for one plan on using his website. Not everyone bothers to download the source and/or use an IDE. This website will be a nice resource to use.
  21. http://www.koders.com/[ Go to top ]

    personally im a fan of
    http://www.koders.com/

    similar kind of thing in lots of languages.
  22. stfu[ Go to top ]

    stfu u idiots
  23. The site looks quite nice and I definitely like the idea of being able to easily look at a library's source code. But there really is a lot of overlap with Jdocs.com. Both sites provide very similar Javadocs browsing functionality, except that Jdocs.com adds the comment feature while JSourcery adds source code access. Rather than adding yet another specialized site, wouldn't it be much nicer if all this functionality was available at a single site?

    Have you contacted the Javalobby guys about this idea? Maybe you could pitch it to them and collaborate with them to integrate this functionality into Jdocs.com instead.

    --
    Digitalhobbit
  24. JSourcery Upgrade[ Go to top ]

    I have attempted to post the following as a top level post on theserverside approximately 4 times, but each message has been ignored. I also wrote the editor personally to inquire as to why my posts were ignored, but no response. The best I can do is add it here to my original post. Thanks for the great feedback. JSourcery is a web site dedicated to providing Java developers with documentation on open source Java projects. With recent upgrades, JSourcery now offers:
    • Javadocs and hyperlinked source code which makes tracing program execution easier.
    • Search. I think its fair to say that JSourcery is the most sophisticated Java source code engine in the world. You can do basic flat searches on Java code, or you can do extremely fine-grained searches on most Java constructs (classes, methods, variables, interfaces, and annotations). For instance, you could search for all methods named warn in org.apache.commons.logging.Log or you could search for all references to the method warn in all APIs listed on JSourcery. See the examples page for more details.
    • Signed-in users can download all processed APIs for local browsing
    • RSS feed to broadcast when new APIs are added
    • Served on a 100Mbit connection.
    The JSourcery web site first went public in December 2004. At this time, it was no more than static html. The changes over the last few years have been based on valuable user feedback. Please continue to help make this a better service. Lastly, at some point this year, the JSourcery software will be made available for download so anyone can process their own APIs, open source or not.
  25. [Normally, I would try a top level post, but if you read the previous post, you'll see why I didn't bother.] The JSourcery web site has provided Javadocs and hyperlinked source code for many open source Java projects for several years. Until now, the software was not open to the public. You can now download it or run the application via webstart. This software will read in Java source code and produce HTML output. It will create the standard Javadoc output, with embedded [Source] links for each class, method, variable, annotation etc, which link to an HTML version of the source code. This source HTML also contains embedded links to class, method, an variable references so you can actually trace program execution. It can be used to process your own Java software for private usage or to produce content for public browsing on a web site. The JRE 1.5 version can be downloaded from... http://www.jsourcery.com/download/JSourcery1.5.zip and the JRE 1.6 version can be downloaded from... http://www.jsourcery.com/download/JSourcery1.6.zip To try it out using webstart (probably easier) you can use the following links. The JRE 1.5 version: http://www.jsourcery.com/webstart/1.5/launch15.jnlp The JRE 1.6 version: http://www.jsourcery.com/webstart/1.6/launch16.jnlp There is no difference between the 1.5 and 1.6 versions. Both are made available for convenience's sake. The software is currently in beta. There isn't much documentation available on the web yet, but everything you should need is included in the download bundle or through the JavaHelp of the application itself. If you have any questions, you can ask them at here. Rob