Discussions

Web tier: servlets, JSP, Web frameworks: Is JSF ready to take on ASP.Net?

  1. Is JSF ready to take on ASP.Net? (8 messages)

    Hello,

    I recently posted a quick review of MS ASP.Net and Visual Studio 2005 (Whidbey) compared to what is available today with the current JSF development enabled IDEs.

    I think JSF and it's relatively new IDE development support is definitely on the path to strongly competing with MS ASP.Net's development experience.

    Check it out and feel free to comment:

    http://jroller.com/page/cschalk/20050531#is_jsf_ready_to_take

    -Chris

    Threaded Messages (8)

  2. Could you also compare the components deployment for both IDE? How many steps do you need for adding a new control?

    Thank you,
     Marina
     http://www.servletsuite.com/
  3. If you mean comparing components themselves that definitely would be a good exercise.. As you may have seen my last blog posting showed how to work with WebGalileo Faces (www.jscape.com/webgalileofaces) with Oracle JDeveloper. In fact, there is a growing number of JSF components such as the open source MyFaces (myfaces.apache.org), Oracle also offers a cool new component library with it's ADF Faces (otn.oracle.com/jsf)... And many more.. You can see a good list of these components at jsfcentral.com.

    If your question is one components deployment, since essentially JSF components are Java classes and tag libraries (tlds) they follow the standard J2EE Web deployment methodology with a War file..

    If your question is how to add JSF components to an IDE, this differs on the IDE. In JDeveloper, it's just a matter of locating the JSP tag library for the components as well as any associated classes/jars. Sun's Creator Studio has a new Component Import feature that speeds up the process of importing 3rd party JSF components.

    -Chris
  4. From technology, JSF and ASP.NET, I think, are same. Actually some places in JSF are better than ASP.NET. But from commercial environment, JSF just looks like academic research project. From http://www.asp.net, you can find a lot of server control vendors. I really hope that JSF can someday create some package like ASP.NET System.ComponentModel.LicenseManager to make commercial JSF components easy.
  5. I am mainly a .NET developer, but since this year I have been envolved in J2EE projects.

    My first impressions on JSF were very good, EXCEPT for one thing :

    Backing beans defined and one XML file.

    ASP.NET defines its "backing classes" (called "code behind" or "code beside") on a page directive in the ASP.NET page.

    In my opinion it is a WAY better aproach than keeping all the definitions on a separate file.

    One question about JSF :

    In ASP.NET we can write "Designer classes" which are responsible for designing the control on design time. These classes are associated to the controls (by "attributes" or "annotations") and allow IDE to render the control, so that developers can check the appearance of custom controls in design time (even in dynamic way, changing properties and so on).

    Does JSF have the same feature? (Designer classes)
  6. I am mainly a .NET developer, but since this year I have been envolved in J2EE projects.My first impressions on JSF were very good, EXCEPT for one thing :Backing beans defined and one XML file. ASP.NET defines its "backing classes" (called "code behind" or "code beside") on a page directive in the ASP.NET page.In my opinion it is a WAY better aproach than keeping all the definitions on a separate file.One question about JSF : In ASP.NET we can write "Designer classes" which are responsible for designing the control on design time. These classes are associated to the controls (by "attributes" or "annotations") and allow IDE to render the control, so that developers can check the appearance of custom controls in design time (even in dynamic way, changing properties and so on).Does JSF have the same feature? (Designer classes)

    I tend to like the central nature of the managed beans of JSF. This highlights, I think the more flexible notion of managed beans in that they could be used purely as a "backing bean" to a specific page, or could be used just as generic classes to be used in any number of JSF pages. Since you already add a taglib directive to a JSp page for the JSF tags you want to use, adding another page directive to define the class(es) used in the page seems a little overkill to me. To each his own.. :)

    With regards to a "single" configuration file, this is kind of the default or most common early examples of JSF apps, but you can actually have multiple config files. For example Sun's Creator Studio separates the faces-config file into two files: one to handle just the navigation rules, the other to handle the managed beans and the rest of the classes/configurations..

    -Chris
  7. Looking forward...[ Go to top ]

    ... I tend to like the central nature of the managed beans of JSF. This highlights, I think the more flexible notion of managed beans in that they could be used purely as a "backing bean" to a specific page, or could be used just as generic classes to be used in any number of JSF pages ...

    Well, I can't imagine a "real world" example where a backing bean would be reused to manage different JSF pages ;)

    Anyway, I am looking forward to see JSF spread. It will be a big boost on J2EE web development. On the other hand, some ASP.NET 2.0 features seems very promising...

    Kind of changing topic, Do you think that before ASP.NET come into scene, the J2EE world was very confortable with Struts? I mean, does ASP.NET made JSF spec develop faster?
  8. ...[ Go to top ]

    ok i'm a computer science student and you know guys i'm just about to bang my head in the table 'cause i'm really very confused about which way to go J2EE or .NET ...
  9. I forgot to address your "designer classes" question.

    This is an area that JSF is still working on. There was a metadata proposal by Oracle not long ago which addresses how Tools render and offer design time support to JSF components.

    http://www.jsfcentral.com/articles/oracle_metadata_proposal.html

    I think this will be addressed in JSF 2.0, but I'll doublecheck with the JSF EG (Ed or Adam) on this since it's definitely an important area..

    -Chris