JRequire, Java/J2EE Requirement Coverage Tool, released

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News: JRequire, Java/J2EE Requirement Coverage Tool, released

  1. JRequire is a requirement coverage tool that facilitates getting an instant view of requirements that are successfully covered by code, broken requirements and requirements that are not covered by code.

    JRequire works on top of JUnit, the unit testing framework, to identify the requirement coverage in the code. This also makes JRequire useful for projects which use tools that operate on top of JUnit, such as Cactus, StrutsTestcase, etc.
     
    Why use JRequire?
    JRequire facilitates efficiently managing the coverage of requirements in your code.

    From a developer's perspective, JRequire faciliates getting an instant view of:
    • requirements successfully covered by code
    • broken requirements
    • requirements that are not covered
    As a project manager you get a good visibility into whether you are meeting the project requirements, and the potential risk areas. In addition, as the code enhances and unit tests fail or lag, you can identify the requirements that are at risk.

    JRequire is well-integrated with Eclipse and Ant with an easy to use interface. This makes it convenient for developers to stay focused on the requirements without having to switch between tools.
     
    Getting started
    JRequire is available as Community Edition (free for non-commercial use), Trial Edition and Commercial Edition, with downloads and pricing available from the product page.

    The tool comes bundled with a sample application for easy reference.
  2. This tool has most boring demonstration ever. You should cut the 15 minutes of crap about how to add or remove entries to your fancy editor and get to the point. It doesn't even allow fast forward...

    It seems that this tool can build a false impression about coverate level. If all test cases attached to some particular requirement are passing, it doesn't really mean that requirement is actually covered.

    Besides that. How this tool is any different from test groups that can be simulated by JUnit test suites at some level or explicitly configured in TestNG?
  3. The demo gives a tour of the key features in a proper sequence so that the viewer is not left to guessing how (s)he reached a particular point.

    JRequire intends to make development more requirement focused. The developer can keep an eye on the requirement coverage as development proceeds. Note that a project manager doesn't need to even think about an IDE. The IDE integration, as one can expect, is primarily for developers. The project management team can get a view of the requirement coverage by just looking at the build reports. JRequire offers an easy integration with ANT for this purpose.

    JRequire is most effectively applied when the unit tests associated with the requirement cover various unit testing scenarios. What makes it more interesting is as development proceeds and code changes, developers/management team have a handle on which requirements are broken and are at risk.
  4. Key features[ Go to top ]

    Time to read: http://www.computerworld.com/developmenttopics/development/story/0,10801,103905,00.html

    A tour of key features isn't what your users want to see.
  5. The demo gives a tour of the key features in a proper sequence so that the viewer is not left to guessing how (s)he reached a particular point.

    Are you expecting that your users won't be smart enough to figure out how to use add/delete actions from apopup menu?
    Moreover importing CSV has nothing to do with requirements coverage, so why should I stear at this for over 5 minutes. Demo should get to the point and should not have 20 seconds animations of moving mouse pointer if you really need to impress someone.
    JRequire intends to make development more requirement focused. The developer can keep an eye on the requirement coverage as development proceeds.

    Thats simple. Just add these tests into one or several groups in TestNG. Well, there is some limitations in TestNG, but I'm sure they will be resolved very quick. :-)
    Note that a project manager doesn't need to even think about an IDE. The IDE integration, as one can expect, is primarily for developers. The project management team can get a view of the requirement coverage by just looking at the build reports. JRequire offers an easy integration with ANT for this purpose.

    I see... You probably shown this at the end of your demo. Din't you? :-)
    JRequire is most effectively applied when the unit tests associated with the requirement cover various unit testing scenarios. What makes it more interesting is as development proceeds and code changes, developers/management team have a handle on which requirements are broken and are at risk.

    It sounds cool, but do you really think that your users are going to release producs with broken unit tests?

    Besides, I wonder how would you deal with the situation when unit tests had been removed, renamed or moved into the different package during refactoring? BTW with TestNG's groups it is not an issue at all.
  6. Well, the idea is to not let broken unit tests (and thus broken requirements) even go past development. However, during interim code drops, it is quite possible that unit tests fail. It's extremely good to have visibility into which requirements are impacted, such as, when doing internal demos.

    Yes, it is possible to take care of code refactorings.
  7. Congrat![ Go to top ]

    Hi, I haven't time to check out the project, but it's very impressive, I've been looking for a free coverage tool for eclipse for a long time, and now I'm glad, you provided this project. Congratulations
  8. It is not a test coverage[ Go to top ]

    It predends to be requirements coverage.

    For a test coverage integration plugins for eclipse you can look at djUnit or Coverclipse plugins.