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News: Enerjy CQ2 Code Quality Solution for Dev Managers Released

  1. Enerjy has released Enerjy CQ2, a code quality management tool for Java development managers seeking early detection of coding errors. The tool allows managers, for the first time, to monitor individual developers coding and testing behaviors to correct problems before they become project setbacks.

    Key features of Enerjy CQ2 include:

    Alerts to standards and coding violations enabling development managers to take corrective action
    Integrated reporting system empowers development managers to monitor:
     - Quality of the project as a whole
     - Quality of individual developer’s work
    Report metrics to help you discover:
     - Amount of code developers are writing / editing / deleting
     - Amount of code being tested / unit test coverage
     - Number of tests being written
     - Number of tests passing / failing
    Code analyzer feature enables developers to self audit and modify their own behaviors to problems before handing it over to management for review:
     - Best Practices
     - Standards Compliance
     - Bug Detection

    Using Enerjy CQ2's self-auditing and correction feature, developers can also review and correct errors before they are flagged on the console. Additionally, Enerjy CQ2 collects key performance indicators, allowing senior management to review detailed reports on the quality of the application being written in real time.

    With Enerjys Precision Team Management technology, Enerjy CQ2 empowers development managers to monitor, measure and modify the behaviors of individual developers. This new process to the development cycle identifies if individual developers are adhering to testing, coverage, and quality standards throughout the development lifecycle. As a result, managers can take corrective action to continuously improve the quality of the application project.

    Threaded Messages (10)

  2. Validation?[ Go to top ]

    This looks very interesting, but I couldn't find, from their site, information concerning the validation of the metrics used. To me, measurements and graphs by themselves are useless unless I know how the path of reasoning from desired outcomes to measurements to applicable industries goes.

    Is code coverage testing more valid than measuring the size of skulls? What relation does it have to "code quality?" Are there subcategories of "code quality" of which some matter more to certain industries and some matter more to others? What kind of variation is normal? How can I detect the improvement of team or corporate culture from these metrics?

    I can do my own guessing, and a unvalidated tool doesn't really protect me from liability.
  3. Re: Validation?[ Go to top ]

    Hi Mikael

    A development manager can't manage what can't be measured. Out of the metrics that are available, we've identified the ones that we believe are directly related to code quality. These metrics are presented in a format that make them easy to collect, understand, and act upon.

    In terms of liability, the development manager who has done something with these metrics is in a better position than the one who has done nothing.

    Regards

    Mark Dixon
    CTO, Enerjy Software
  4. Re: Validation?[ Go to top ]

    Hi Mark,
    A development manager can't manage what can't be measured. Out of the metrics that are available, we've identified the ones that we believe are directly related to code quality. These metrics are presented in a format that make them easy to collect, understand, and act upon.In terms of liability, the development manager who has done something with these metrics is in a better position than the one who has done nothing.

    Yes, but (in a perfect world) a development manager also understands what it is he's basing his decisions on, in other words how are the metrics calculated. Perhaps you could consider putting names/explanations of the algorithms on your company webpage/product manuals/...?

    Otherwise it very much resembles doing something just for the sake of doing something (with no actual measurable benefit). I remember a joke where Dilbert was asked for some reports and he answered something in the lines of "Do you want me to explain for 10 minutes why you can't use these reports or are you from marketing?". The guy answered you-know-what and Dilbert handed him the reports.

    Long story short - I don't think the development manager should "be from marketing". I understood you have identified the useful metrics. Please luk these as well. From my (potential client) point of view it only builds credibility and trust.

    Regards,
    Einar

    P.S. I had a very good impression of your product at the pavilion during the last JavaOne. I'll try to evaluate your CQ2 version as soon as possible.
  5. How Much?[ Go to top ]

    Can you provide a ballpark cost for this so I know whether it is even worth my while finding out if it is useful.
  6. Just another QA tool ..[ Go to top ]

    I wonder what the business case is for this tool .. In a world of open source solutions like PMD, JDepend, CheckStyle, and Hammurapi your turf is small. Even Parasoft start to realize this.
  7. Just another QA tool ..[ Go to top ]

    Plus their 244 inspections pales in comparison to the over 500 found in IntelliJ. Unless I'm missing something, you could simply get IntelliJ, tack on a code coverage tool (several free ones to choose from or buy Clover) and your done. Since they don't openly publish the cost of this product I'm assuming it's pretty damn expensive.
  8. An Indian company I was working with earlier, was in the process of developing a Code clinic for their flag ship financial client from France, to detect code issues, perform automated code reviews, implement best practices (Aspect Rules) to increase developer productivity for managing around 30K Java sources in their Securites Services Re-engineering project.I cannot disclose the name, but its the biggest Java, J2EE project ever in whole EU.

    If something like that can come together, it would such nice thing to have !

    PMD + Clover + CheckStyle + AspectJ + Simian = Code Clinic for all major IDE's

    Peace,
    Vijay
  9. ...right here. A fair review... he talks about the profiler and whatnot.

    I poked around the Enerjy web site a bit but couldn't figure out if they have a copy/paste detector like CPD.
  10. Just to clarify, that blog entry refers to a presentation about their existing code analysis tool, which as you probably noticed I was lukewarm about. CQ2 is something else entirely.

    I had a conference call with one of their tech guys a few of weeks ago and I like the whole dashboard approach to summarizing code quality. While the CQ2 website tells you about the key features, there's certainly some stuff that isn't (yet?) mentioned. Some of these other features are particularly useful, IMHO. Perhaps they are mentioned in the whitepapers - I'll take a look when I get a chance.

    Simon
  11. Free Alternative - hammurapi[ Go to top ]

    Here is a free alternative:
    http://www.hammurapi.org
    Hammurapi is an Open Source Java code review tool. It has more than 120 embedded Inspectors and such unique features as waivers, autowaivers and cascading rulesets.