Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey

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Blogs: Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey

  1. Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey (22 messages)

    Bruce Tate got a new pet Monkey that he named Joe and wouldn’t you know it, Joe learned how to code. This made Joe a much more interesting Pet then his old pony Seabusbus. But as is the case with all pets, they are cute when young and but can cause no end of grief as they older. Take a Friday break and learn more about Bruce's new pet Joe.

    Threaded Messages (22)

  2. Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey[ Go to top ]

    A dog is for life, not just for Christmas...

    "Dog ownership comes with a great deal of responsibility and once the novelty of a cute and furry present bounding round your living room wears off, these poor animals are often discarded as looking after them becomes a chore."

    http://www.walsall.gov.uk/newsdocs/NewsArticle.asp?NewsId=2351
  3. Context-shift Whiplash[ Go to top ]

    Did we read the same blog entry?
  4. Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey[ Go to top ]

    What is it ? Some kind of joke? Can someone remove it from TSS. Post this as news in TSS too ugly.
  5. Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey[ Go to top ]

    Cool...
    a little bit of fun in this ocean of serious posts...

    and not surprisingly, some of you will find this to be non professional...cmon, buy and read PeopleWare : http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0932633439/104-4843302-3374330?v=glance&n=283155&v=glance

    Laurent.

    little joke : do you know the difference between a cemetery and a WC ?
    well, there aren't any : when you've got to go.....you've got go.
  6. Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey[ Go to top ]

    Monkeys rule. That can also make coffee if you train them. I have 4 in the office to do all kinds of tasks.

     S.
  7. Stir crazy[ Go to top ]

    Editors Note : Inappropriate content removed.
  8. Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey[ Go to top ]

    No offense, I think Joe is hilarious. But really, shouldn't this be in the "Blogs" section?

    If not, can also you post my most recent blog entry as a new story? It's called "Be a TCFTC block for Halloween this year". It's just as funny, I promise! Come on TSS! I also have some support questions I could use answered. :-)

    Keith
    http://www.jroller.com/page/kdonald
  9. +1

    There seems to be more and more of such posts on "News" sections.

    It's first some transaction rollback, samy hero and now this monkey; what's happening TSS? They've their audiences given the right section.
  10. +1There seems to be more and more of such posts on "News" sections.It's first some transaction rollback, samy hero and now this monkey; what's happening TSS? They've their audiences given the right section.

    Gotta keep trafic to the site. Coming up soon - nude pictures.

    Is it me or since TMC was acquired, this site has been moving off target (pun!).
  11. +1There seems to be more and more of such posts on "News" sections.It's first some transaction rollback, samy hero and now this monkey; what's happening TSS? They've their audiences given the right section.

    Samy is news as it exposes a serious security flaw in AJAX that developers should know about.

    The Monkey posting as being humorus look at a serious discussion that is taking place in the community right now. I find the post delivers it's message in a creative and entertaining manner. It authored by someone who is well respected in the community. Bruce is a developer, a speaker and a best selling author. On that basis alone the blog has it's merits.

    Kind regards,
    Kirk Pepperdine
  12. Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey[ Go to top ]

    I'm sorry, is this some kind of news? Did someone hack theserverside and is posting fake news? Does my DNS point www.theserverside.com to some funny-jajaja clone?
    I had it. I'm never visiting this site again. I'm evolving to java.net.

    Regards,
    Martin
  13. Joe, the Amazing Coding Monkey[ Go to top ]

    I realize Bruce has some books to sell, and has been talking up Geary who's inevitably coming out with another RoR book. I read Bruce's article over at onjava.com (!) and while Ruby's syntax is more compact (easier to read is a toss up), he did everything he could to make Java look overly burdensome.

    There's a couple other questions: are continuations only practical for procedural programming? Encapsulation of state within OO seems to prove that the continuation requirement is unecessary.

    Convention over configuration and metaprogramming are strong goals within Java-- take a look at the EJB 3/persistence spec. But as was already admitted, Ruby/RoR isn't there yet, performance wise compared to other Java frameworks.

    Anyways, if Ruby truly has it's place and popularity, then it's simply asinine to be posting this stuff on Java.net and TSS.
  14. Had a good laugh
    Friday, August 21
    A puppy! What an adorable little puppy! Here, Ruby, Ruby.

    GOTO: Wednesday, August 12
  15. funny blog, and...[ Go to top ]

    a good weekend meal!

    horse has been fat. what is the next generation of java? i would know that is the monkey joe. :)

    but really, now the chief editor is not as good as that one before.
  16. Lighten Up![ Go to top ]

    I think some of us are missing the point. The overall purpose of this "article" *ahem* is to laugh! Who cares if Bruce is jabbing Java a little. I'm certainly no fan of Ruby, but I'm also not wound up so much as to not be able to appreciate a little drollery.

    It does beg to ask the question: What if Ruby does surpasses Java? I absolutely don't think it will...but what if? Someday something will.

    I've taught several Java classes and it's funny how much resistance I get from the older procedural programmers. They sound, well, a little like us when someone presents something that is different from Java. I'm not into jumping bandwagons, but when the time comes that this band wagon slows to a halt, and Ruby or some other technology is taking off, I'll jump. I've got bills to pay!

    Food for thought.

    Thad Smith
  17. Lighten Up![ Go to top ]

    People are worrying about nothing. We've all seen all these doom messages before when .net appeared. If mammoth Microsoft couldn't replace Java with all their weight and $$$, I really doubt some 12 y-o niche-oriented language/framework will. And in case it happens, it will just be the case of learning a new tool, no big deal.

    Lighten up,
    Henrique Steckelberg
  18. Lighten Up![ Go to top ]

    +1. If one doesn't like it, they can ignore it. Or as for a refund. :)
  19. TSS quality is slipping[ Go to top ]

    What the hell is going on with quality control at TSS? Since Floyd Marinescu left we've had:

    - Katrina relief appeals (maybe my opinion is controversial but I felt it didn't belong here)
    - Some guy posting his homework questions
    - "samy is my hero"
    - This drivel about a pet monkey.

    Come on TSS, sort it out.
  20. Right associations?[ Go to top ]

    It seems odd that Bruce chose a monkey to represent Java and a dog to represent Ruby. After all, aren't monkeys agile and dogs slow? (Or is "dog slow" a regional expression?)
  21. In all seriousness...[ Go to top ]

    Guy Steele gave a great talk at OOPSLA a few years back on language design in which he talked about the lifecycle of a language.

    Let me paraphrase the essentials (as I remember them):

    People flocked to a new language early on because it is a simple language with minimal class libraries. As it matures the libraries multiply and the language takes on features that complicate it. Over time the language becomes a large thing that scares new users (the books on the bookstore shelf are really thick). Usually at the five year mark a new language comes along. Small, easy to learn, with a low cost of entry. People flock to it. The cycle continues.

    Guy knows what he's talking about--he's lived the cycle. I could serverely injure someone by throwing my copy of "Common Lisp: the Language" at them.

    The appearance of Ruby (as a force) is a little past the five year mark but it fits the pattern. Of course languages don't die; they just split marketshare. C++ is alive and well ten years after the appearance of Java.

    As a recovering Smalltalker I find the excitement around Ruby a little ironic. A little bit "back to the future". Myself, I recently bought a copy of Stéphane Ducasse's "Squeak: Learn Programming with Robots" to introduce my kids to Smalltalk. I think my kids can pick up Smalltalk much easier than Ruby. All those "@" signs are ugly.

    --Shaun (has written lots of Smalltalk and enough Ruby to be dangerous)
  22. In all seriousness...[ Go to top ]

    Of course languages don't die; they just split marketshare. C++ is alive and well ten years after the appearance of Java.

    A look at the TIOBE index is illustrative:
    http://www.tiobe.com/tpci.htm

    Although they are not that widespread, there is still significant use of LISP, FORTRAN and COBOL and they are all between 40 and 50 years old, and still changing. C is extremely popular and is over 30 years old! I am afraid I can only be sceptical at any suggestion that Java as a language is stagnating and is likely to be replaced as a major language anytime soon. I don't think that the evidence of IT history backs any such conclusion. Programming languages change and adapt to new demands.
    As a recovering Smalltalker I find the excitement around Ruby a little ironic.

    Indeed.
  23. Joe the amazing coding monkey[ Go to top ]

    Should give both Bruce and Joe a banana