XINS 1.3 released, adding SOAP and XML-RPC to REST support

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News: XINS 1.3 released, adding SOAP and XML-RPC to REST support

  1. XINS 1.3 has been released. Previously this framework only supported REST-style calls, but now it offers SOAP- and XML-RPC-support. Deploy one application and make REST-, SOAP-, XML-RPC- and possibly other type of calls to this one instance, without redeploying or reconfiguring.

    Other frameworks, such as Apache Axis and Sun JWSDP, have a steep learning curve and offer a limited amount of test support. XINS on the other hand does not require any knowledge of XML Schemas, WSDL, etc. It generates WSDL and other forms of specifications and documentation, as needed.

    Also, it generates client-side and server-side code. Both are semantically equivalent with your specifications. For example, if your specification says there is an input parameter birthdate and an output parameter age, then the corresponding generated classes will have getBirthdate() and getAge() methods, respectively.

    Test your applications with your web browser, using the generated test forms. Again, these match the specifications.

    The projects's home page provides a 15-minute tutorial (the "XINS Primer"), a User Guide, screenshots, a demo and various forms of other documentation.

    Overview of changes since release 1.2.5: server-side SOAP- and XML-RPC-support was added, filtering for diagnostic context IDs, a meta-function for automated ACL checking, etc. Unit tests for API implementations and multiple implementations per API are now supported. API stubs and API unit tests can be generated from examples. Generated test forms have been improved. Various other enhancements and bug fixes were implemented. Extensive testing and performance tuning was performed.

    Would you consider XINS as an RPC technology or as a Web Services framework?
  2. Another not standard protocol? Another way to use xml-rpc?
  3. Another not standard protocol? Another way to use xml-rpc?

    XINS supports different standards: XML-RPC, SOAP and REST-style RPC calls. It does this by providing an extremely simple XML (standard) based format, which is easily translated to HTML documentation, WSDL, etc.

    See XINS as a powerful container that lets you run your application in a sandbox and provides it with various means of support...
  4. Another not standard protocol? Another way to use xml-rpc?
    XINS supports different standards: XML-RPC, SOAP and REST-style RPC calls. It does this by providing an extremely simple XML (standard) based format, which is easily translated to HTML documentation, WSDL, etc.See XINS as a powerful container that lets you run your application in a sandbox and provides it with various means of support...

    Oh good...yes it is a fast way to dialog between components..i will use it!
  5. Oh good...yes it is a fast way to dialog between components..i will use it!
    Let us know how you use it and what you think of it! Will you use the REST-ful approach (which the XINS Primer showcases) or as SOAP service (potentially replacing Apache Axis?) or as an alternative XML-RPC framework?

    We would be interested to hear your comments and suggestions for improvements. You can send these to the xins-users mailing list: http://lists.sourceforge.net/mailman/listinfo/xins-users

    Ernst
  6. I'm dense, so I didn't get XINS at first. I looked at it as a possible replacement for Axis in my Web Service load testing tool (TestMaker.) What I found instead is a nicely thought out framework for building XML message-based applications. It reminds me of Ruby on Rails as the building-blocks to a RPC-style application are all there. If I want to provide a REST interface for a service then a few XML configuration files in XINS and a function definition in Java are all I have to create to be up and running.

    -Frank
  7. If I want to provide a REST interface for a service then a few XML configuration files in XINS and a function definition in Java are all I have to create to be up and running.

    I'm glad somebody finally gets what XINS is about. I find it very hard to explain in just a few words what XINS is, because it is or can be so many things. Is it a framework for REST-style RPC implementations? Yes. Is it a Web Services technology? Yes. Is it a code generation tool? Yes. Is it a specification technology? Yes. So what is it? :-)

    If you have any additional feedback or even suggestions for the documentation or for the next feature release, 1.4.0, please drop an e-mail at the xins-users mailing list.