NextApp releases Echo2 2.0.0, web framework with AJAX

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News: NextApp releases Echo2 2.0.0, web framework with AJAX

  1. NextApp has released Echo2 2.0.0, a reinvention of the Echo Web Framework built around an AJAX rendering engine. Distributed under the Mozilla Public License, Echo2 aims at providing a component-oriented/event-driven toolkit for developing web applications that approach the capabilities of rich clients. The EchoStudio development environment, a $499 USD Eclipse plugin, has also been updated to match the Echo2 framework.

    Echo2 features:
    • Applications are developed in server-side Java using a component-oriented and event-driven API that works like a user interface toolkit.
    • Rendering is accomplished entirely via AJAX, using a single HTML document. Server-based updates are rendered in the smallest form possible, only updating portions of the HTML document that have changed.
    • Applications can display true modal dialogs, where the application will disallow input outside of the modal area.
    • Server push technology enables an application to control client browsers outside of the traditional web request/response cycle.
    • An extensible component development API allows the creation of reusable AJAX components.
    • Support is provided for modern web browsers including Firefox, Internet Explorer, Opera, Konqueror, Safari, Mozilla, and Netscape.
    With EchoStudio, developers can visually assemble Echo2 components into complete user interfaces using the EchoStudio2 Form Editor, and build application themes using the StyleSheet Editor tool. Applications can be launched and debugged entirely from within the EchoStudio2/Eclipse environment.

    Threaded Messages (10)

  2. Interesting technology. A couple of questions:

    1. The ApplicationInstance is stored in the user's HTTP session. Is this perhaps too heavyweight and will affect an Echo2 app's ability to scale up?

    2. By never replacing the original window, it appears the problem of the "back" button is solved because there is never a back button displayed (no comment on whether or not breaking the "web" experience is good or not, but I understand that this solves some nasty problems). But if the window is accidentally "closed", can the app be relaunched and pick up where it was left off? This wasn't clear to me from reading the docs.

    3. Any metrics on how chatty AJAX apps like this affect Servlet container performance?
  3. Interesting technology. A couple of questions:1. The ApplicationInstance is stored in the user's HTTP session. Is this perhaps too heavyweight and will affect an Echo2 app's ability to scale up?2. By never replacing the original window, it appears the problem of the "back" button is solved because there is never a back button displayed (no comment on whether or not breaking the "web" experience is good or not, but I understand that this solves some nasty problems). But if the window is accidentally "closed", can the app be relaunched and pick up where it was left off? This wasn't clear to me from reading the docs.3. Any metrics on how chatty AJAX apps like this affect Servlet container performance?
    I'd look at their forums for some answers. Alot of good information there.
  4. Interesting technology. A couple of questions:1. The ApplicationInstance is stored in the user's HTTP session. Is this perhaps too heavyweight and will affect an Echo2 app's ability to scale up?

    In short yes. The components that make up and Echo2 app are chained together into a component hierarchy and stored in the session.

    Having just completed a "large scale web app" design course then having large HttpSession's is considered bad practice.

    If you consider that largish HttpSessions are bad, then Echo2 is the not sort of framework you should use if you are trying to rebuild EBAY. The same goes for JSF or Tapestry, because they build "component trees" and store them on a per user basis.

    BUT if you need a very well defined web application environment that allows for a richer user experience, and your user demographics are "reasonable" then I highly recommend Echo2.

    2.By never replacing the original window, it appears the problem of the "back" button is solved because there is never a back button displayed (no comment on whether or not breaking the "web" experience is good or not, but I understand that this solves some nasty problems). But if the window is accidentally "closed", can the app be relaunched and pick up where it was left off? This wasn't clear to me from reading the docs.

    Yes. The back button takes you back to the page before the Echo2 app started. If you presse forward from there, you et back to the last state of the Echo2 app.

    As for closing windows accidently, as long as you dont close your browser completely (and hence the session cookie is lost) then it will display up to the last "state point".
    3. Any metrics on how chatty AJAX apps like this affect Servlet container performance?

    Thats the million dollar question. I dont think that AJAX has been in production long enough for people to know this.

    I would be interested in other peoples views on AJAX request performance.
  5. Yay[ Go to top ]

    O Yay! Please place more release announcements here, especially when AJAX is involved.
  6. Another Example of Echo2 in Action[ Go to top ]

    In addition to the online demos, another example of an application using Echo2 is TrackIt: http://trackit.sf.net. It's a highly configurable project / issue tracking tool with many features, such as CVS / SVN integration, Timeline view with RSS support, unlimited item types (tickets, action items, etc.), a high level informational summary for the current user, and much more.
  7. Now after you have wrote a great piece of code, you need to hire a web designer who can put some visual polish on it ;)
  8. Echo2 Articles[ Go to top ]

    I wrote a few Echo2 related articles and demos a while back:

    http://ensode.net/echo2_review.html

    http://ensode.net/echo2_closer_look.html

    http://ensode.net/echopointng_intro.html

    http://ensode.net/echo2_drag_drop.html
  9. Fight against ASP.net2.0?[ Go to top ]

    Compare with MS' ASP.net2.0 nextAPP's Echo2.0 seems a little immature.
  10. Fight against ASP.net2.0?[ Go to top ]

    Compare with MS' ASP.net2.0 nextAPP's Echo2.0 seems a little immature.

    Why?
  11. Real world echo2 example[ Go to top ]

    Here's a real world echo2 implementation http://www.jx2.com.au/vinx2.html