RIFE 1.3.1 released

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News: RIFE 1.3.1 released

  1. RIFE 1.3.1 released (9 messages)

    RIFE 1.3.1 has been released. RIFE is a full-stack, open-source Java web application framework, providing request-based and component-based approaches and blending them together into a consistent component object model. This release offers important new features and fixes since release 1.0.

    The framework has attracted a lot of interest recently, going from its presence on major conferences like TheServerSide Java Symposium, JavaPolis and EuroOSCON to the endorsement of its viability as a modern Java web development solution by prominent developers like Bruce Tate, Guillaume Laforge, Patrick Lightbody and David Heinemeier Hansson.

    Highlights of the releases since version 1.0 are:
    The RIFE community also transformed and imported the previous static user's guide into the wiki to create RIFE LiveGuide. This allows readers to contribute to the documentation as they peruse it.

    The complete official announcement of this release can be found at the project's website.

    Threaded Messages (9)

  2. Comparison with others[ Go to top ]

    How do you can compare RIFE with other open-source full-stack frameworks as:

    - OpenXava
    - AppFuse
    - EJOSA
    - OpenMDX
    - AndroMDA

    Thank you
  3. Comparison with others[ Go to top ]

    How do you can compare RIFE with other open-source full-stack frameworks as
    Hi Javier,

    I can't really comment on that since I never used any of these. From what I see at a very short glance, RIFE is much easier to work with and doesn't require you to delve into architectural overviews and concepts before being able to get started. It's main purpose is to address the Long Tail and to allow smaller shops to quickly create maintainable solutions.

    You can find movies about how to develop with RIFE here:
    http://rifers.org/theater
    This should give you a good feel about the general approach.

    You can also find a summarized feature-list here:
    http://rifers.org/features

    I hope this was somewhat helpful.
  4. tutorial video's[ Go to top ]

    You can find movies about how to develop with RIFE here:http://rifers.org/theaterThis should give you a good feel about the general approach.You can also find a summarized feature-list here:http://rifers.org/featuresI hope this was somewhat helpful.

    Is it just me, or do those video's have no audio?
  5. tutorial video's[ Go to top ]

    You can find movies about how to develop with RIFE here:http://rifers.org/theaterThis should give you a good feel about the general approach.You can also find a summarized feature-list here:http://rifers.org/featuresI hope this was somewhat helpful.
    Is it just me, or do those video's have no audio?
    Also, aren't they too darn fast?
  6. tutorial video's[ Go to top ]

    You're right, there's no audio (yet).
    About the speed, you can always pause when you need to do so. The reason it's done like this is that for people that are just watching it to get a feel, a slower pace gets very frustrating.
  7. continuation question[ Go to top ]

    I think continuation are interesting. I am wondering how this is handled when having say a multi-node app or a cluster.

    It sounds to me that only a sticky session mechanism will ensure each user will have its own continuation context maintained. Thus limiting this to webapps.
    Then if a node is about to crash, this context is lost - which means that there can't be guarantee as say http session offers when using a reliable store mechanism.
  8. continuation question[ Go to top ]

    Hi Alex, the current continuations storage are indeed in-memory and rely on cloneability of objects. However, we're working on allowing people to rely on serializability instead, which can then be stored in a clustered cache, clustered sessions, etc. Also, by providing an additional continuations tree identifier, it's possible to ensure that the requests within the same continuation tree always go to the same server in the cluster.
    This is still WIP, but there are no indications that it will not work, time is just an issue to get it done, but isn't that always the case ;-)
  9. A basic question[ Go to top ]

    Excuse me if my question is very basic.

    What's a full-stack framework? Is it true that

    full-stack framework = Struts + Spring + Hibernate/iBATIS + SOAP?

    What kind of IDE called X-develop was used in the video? If I use Eclipse, do I have all those features of that X-develop?
  10. A basic question[ Go to top ]

    One can debate long about what a full stack framework is and I suppose it depends on how one wants to sell oneself. In my book, a full stack framework provides everything in one package (one jar in RIFE's case) and doesn't require any configuration to make things work together. Also, since it's full stack, it's possible to make things a lot easier for the user since you control every layer and things like meta data and declarations propagate consistently and automatically.

    X-develop is is my favorite IDE (http://www.omnicore.com). I recommend it to anyone that's interested in a lean and mean intelligent editor that stays out of your way and still offers unique features like instant project-wide error checking, cross-language refactoring and back-in-time debugging. Yes, I know this is a plug, but I just like this IDE so much that I want people to at least give it some credit and try it out.

    Most other RIFE developers and users actually use Eclipse, and everything works in a similar fashion. Someone even ported my X-develop live templates to Eclipse: http://rifers.org/wiki/display/RIFE/RIFE+Templates+for+the+Eclipse+Web+Tools+Platform