Oracle's Project Raptor, GUI database dev tool, in early access

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News: Oracle's Project Raptor, GUI database dev tool, in early access

  1. Oracle's Project Raptor has arrived in the form of an Early Adopter release. With Project Raptor, you can browse database objects, run SQL statements and SQL scripts, and edit and debug PL/SQL statements. Project Raptor was developed in Java leveraging the Oracle JDeveloper IDE framework.

    Project Raptor requires OTN membership (which is free) as well as Java 5, and the download can be specified for Windows (with JDK) or for non-Windows (for which a JDK must be supplied.)

    One observation about Raptor (based on tutorial material) is that it is geared specifically for Oracle databases. While this is not much of a limitation, many developers are using PostgreSQL or MySQL (or SQL Server, or any of a large number of other databases) for development, which might limit Raptor's appeal. (With a free Oracle version, that may not be such a limitation after all, but it's worth considering if only for deployment considerations.)

    Threaded Messages (28)

  2. Going after TOAD[ Go to top ]

    Does this mean Oracle is gunning for TOAD?
  3. many developers are using PostgreSQL or MySQL (or SQL Server, or any of a large number of other databases) for development, which might limit Raptor's appeal.

    +1
  4. Why would Oracle care about the other databases and include features for them in its tool? But then who knows it might well be in the pipeline for future releases.

    I would really like to see something like this as an eclipse plugin. Or is there something I am not aware of?

    C
    http://chintanrajyaguru.com
  5. Oracle would care about databases if it wants to become more than a database company. WebSphere Studio supports MS SQL Server, Oracle, DB2, and others in its database tooling. Admittedly, that tooling's not quite as advanced as what it appears Oracle's done here, but it would help people who run SQL Server or DB2 (UDB / zSeries / iSeries) be able to choose Oracle tools for development and perhaps runtime.
  6. Oracle would care about databases if it wants to become more than a database company. WebSphere Studio supports MS SQL Server, Oracle, DB2, and others in its database tooling. Admittedly, that tooling's not quite as advanced as what it appears Oracle's done here, but it would help people who run SQL Server or DB2 (UDB / zSeries / iSeries) be able to choose Oracle tools for development and perhaps runtime.

    I think Oracle does a pretty good job of running the middle of the road. The standard features of their IDE work well for many platforms. I use JDeveloper to write java apps for OC4J, Tomcat, and Resin. There are a few more value-add features when using OC4J, but that makes sense.

    Also the DBtools that are built into the current Jdeveloper allow you to browse mysql and other databases, but when used against and Oracle database you can create and edit tables. Once again I think this is a reasonable balance.
  7. Is there a strategy here[ Go to top ]

    This is from the Oracle website.
    A production release of Project Raptor is scheduled for early 2006. The production release will be supported by Oracle Support for any customer with a current Oracle Database support contract. The enhancements made for Raptor will be included in a future release of Oracle JDeveloper (post 10.1.3).

    Is this tool available outside JDeveloper? If not, it sounds like a strategy to leverage Oracle database popularity to make people use JDeveloper.

    C
    http://chintanrajyaguru.com
  8. RE: Is there a strategy here[ Go to top ]

    This is from the Oracle website.
    A production release of Project Raptor is scheduled for early 2006. The production release will be supported by Oracle Support for any customer with a current Oracle Database support contract. The enhancements made for Raptor will be included in a future release of Oracle JDeveloper (post 10.1.3).
    Is this tool available outside JDeveloper? If not, it sounds like a strategy to leverage Oracle database popularity to make people use JDeveloper.Chttp://chintanrajyaguru.com

    Raptor is available outside of JDeveloper for people who are just looking for a tool that will allow them to work with the Oracle DB.

    But for the people on this forum (which I guess are mostly Java developers) I would actually suggest looking at the new JDeveloper 10.1.3 which is in EA1 out on OTN , which Raptor is based on - this way you get the type of functionality you get in Raptor (I.E. DB browser, sql execution, PL/SQL code insight and debug) as well as more DB features (such as DB modeling) and a complete Java IDE - all in one integrated IDE.
  9. Is there a strategy here[ Go to top ]

    Is this tool available outside JDeveloper? If not, it sounds like a strategy to leverage Oracle database popularity to make people use JDeveloper.
    You can just extract it into its own directory and run raptor.exe in the root. It comes with its own JRE--on Windows, anyway. So it's just a standalone app.

    It's easy to set up. All you need to put in to create a connection is username, password, hostname, port (default is the usual Oracle 1521) and the SID. If you're using the new XE product, this is "XE", which wasn't obvious (to me at least) from the XE installation.

    The combination of XE and Raptor looks like a really nice dev environment.

    Rgds
    Rod
  10. It's not free but i think http://www.allroundautomations.nl/plsqldev.html is still a superior tool for Oracle DB development.
  11. It's not free but i think http://www.allroundautomations.nl/plsqldev.html is still a superior tool for Oracle DB development.

    It may not be free, but its very cheap. Its a great value and my preference; however, our local TOAD fanatics are very loyal to their tool. We call those guys "warts".
  12. <yawn>
    There are numerous open source tools that do the same things across a wide variety of databases. SQuirreL is one that comes to mind, but there are lots.
  13. I need to look into the free edition of Oracle. Sounds very enticing as its free but more importantly it sounds like you can do any kind of development you would do on a commercial version (ie stored procs, etc.). There are limitations so unless you planning on upgrading to commercial Oracle db, its only suitable for small applications.

    I agree that there are already some decent database browsing tools out there. Just abou Though I haven't looked at this yet, maybe its more advanced. Every shop I've ever gone into using Oracle has T.O.A.D. And T.O.A.D's not super cheap so I've always wondered why Oracle didn't offer a better tool themselves.

    Mike
  14. I need to look into the free edition of Oracle. Sounds very enticing as its free but more importantly it sounds like you can do any kind of development you would do on a commercial version (ie stored procs, etc.). There are limitations so unless you planning on upgrading to commercial Oracle db, its only suitable for small applications.

    I guess "small" is a relative statement. XE is limited by one CPU (not sure how many cores that includes), 1GB of memory and 4GB of disk space.

    Sure not enough for most corporate environments, but not small change either.
  15. I need to look into the free edition of Oracle. Sounds very enticing as its free but more importantly it sounds like you can do any kind of development you would do on a commercial version (ie stored procs, etc.). There are limitations so unless you planning on upgrading to commercial Oracle db, its only suitable for small applications.
    I guess "small" is a relative statement. XE is limited by one CPU (not sure how many cores that includes), 1GB of memory and 4GB of disk space.Sure not enough for most corporate environments, but not small change either.

    Also I forgot to mention that you are allowed to embed and redistribute it with your applications as long as you don't break the above requirements.
  16. Not Bad[ Go to top ]

    It looks so similar to another good tool I have been using - DBVisualizer.
    Plus - Raptor has the option of either specifying a jdbc url string or go through your tnsnames sid's - that is great I think.

    looks like some very good use of Java swing components and very fast too..
  17. Not Bad[ Go to top ]

    Hi,

    I'm pleasantly surprised, given experience with Oracle GUI products in the past.

    I could see myself using this instead of TOAD. For what I do, it may be better, since it's leaner and cleaner. TOAD's getting awfully messy lately, in my opinion.

    Then again, I still do most of my SQL in sqlplus.

    Regards

    John Hurst
    Wellington, New Zealand
  18. Not Bad[ Go to top ]

    Hi,I'm pleasantly surprised, given experience with Oracle GUI products in the past.

    Indeed, between the experience with the speedy RPM installation of Oracle XE and Raptor, one might think that perhaps they fired Satan from their user experience design department.
  19. You never know[ Go to top ]

    Indeed, between the experience with the speedy RPM installation of Oracle XE and Raptor, one might think that perhaps they fired Satan from their user experience design department.

    Perhaps he has just been moved over to Human Resources
  20. Nice[ Go to top ]

    I really like it!! It appears to be pretty fast for the most part. I do run into some performance problems when first opening up a database connection or running sql as a script (program starts eating memory and maxes out the CPU). I like its simplicity and feature set. Really good showing for an early release.

    Joshua
  21. Squirrel[ Go to top ]

    I've been using Squirrel SQL to connect to Oracle, NCR Teradata, Informix, and DB2

    http://www.squirrelsql.org/
  22. One observation about Raptor (based on tutorial material) is that it is geared specifically for Oracle databases. While this is not much of a limitation, many developers are using PostgreSQL or MySQL (or SQL Server, or any of a large number of other databases) for development, which might limit Raptor's appeal.
    I think "being geared specifically for Oracle" is no bad thing. The thing that has always brought me back to Toad when I've tried pure JDBC-based alternatives (which are nice in other ways) is Toad's close integration with Oracle and DBA-ish stuff.

    Nearly all the projects I've been involved with use the database in an advanced enough fashion that trying to develop against one DB and deploy against another would just create problems. Using an O/R mapping tool doesn't really bridge the gap. You get lots of duplicated effort with triggers, stored procs etc. I've seen developers waste a lot of time on this kind of thing, and I've seen it adversely impact design.

    It is quite possible to develop against Oracle--speed is not an issue--the only real issue is that Oracle has a huge footprint and installing it on a machine is a big deal. The solution is to develop in such a way that you can test against Oracle (or Sybase, or whatever enterprise database you use) easily, rather than try to maintain two schemas and port triggers, indexes etc. constantly.

    Rgds
    Rod
  23. It is quite possible to develop against Oracle--speed is not an issue--the only real issue is that Oracle has a huge footprint and installing it on a machine is a big deal. The solution is to develop in such a way that you can test against Oracle (or Sybase, or whatever enterprise database you use) easily, rather than try to maintain two schemas and port triggers, indexes etc. constantly.Rgds Rod

    A few months ago I installed 10g enterprise on my laptop and had to remove it eventually as everything grinds to a halt. Oracle.exe is a monster. I'm anxious to put on the free version as it supposedly has a much smaller footprint.
  24. Yes, I am always reluctant to install Oracle on the machine I use daily. But I normally end up doing so, and when all except the essential services are turned off (it installs a lot of services that you don't want) it isn't too bad.

    The new development option (XE) is a lot smaller (150Mb download) and has a much smaller footprint. I installed it recently, and so far haven't noticed any adverse effect on my system. However, the installer did hang the first time, so they still don't seem to have figured out how to make install painless.

    Rgds
    Rod
  25. i have been using oracle in my laptop (1gb ram) with xp for a while. but i run it within VMWare with CentOS (used up 512mb).

    oracle does came with a tons of services that i hardly used. the only things i turned on are the oracle database instance and the listener, nothing else. it's ok.

    but still, sometimes you still hear the harddrive scratching *crazy*, it's annoying.
  26. Ahh, I'm looking forward to dual-core CPUs in laptops.

    I just switched to a dual-core CPU desktop for my main development machine for this very reason: running Oracle. I have 2x2.8GHz, + 2GB RAM, and I can honestly say that so far I don't notice Oracle running. The screen/keyboard are nicer than a laptop too. But I do miss the flexibility of the laptop, so retain one of those (well two actually!) for that reason.

    With other databases I've used lately (Firebird and PostgreSQL), you could run them without noticing them even on a very modest machine.

    I must check out XE.

    Regards

    John Hurst
  27. If you are already using Oracle DB, then this is a nice solution. Linux/Win32/Unix anything works. It's standalone
    (so no JDEV needed) and as far as I could see, only Oracle DB. Furthermore, it helps SQL development a lot. Check the snippets on the right side. Yes, I'm going to use this.

    Rokesh
  28. WOW!!!!!!!!!.. Just i downloaded the Tool. Its so nice better than TOAD.. Its very clean and We can switch multiple schemas without retyping the SQL queries.
  29. I used MySQL and PostgreSQL before and now using Oracle 11g in my office. I recommend Navicat GUI (http://www.navicat.com). Recently, I visited their site and found that Navicat released a new Oracle GUI - Navicat Oracle Lite. It's free version. Download URL : http://oracle.navicat.com/download.html News : http://blogs.navicat.com I think Navicat is quite intuitive and easy to use.