Sun Java Studio Creator 2 has been released

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News: Sun Java Studio Creator 2 has been released

  1. Sun Java Studio Creator 2 has been released (41 messages)

    Sun's Java Studio Creator 2 has been released for download, after a lengthy beta period. Java Studio Creator (JSC2) is an IDE designed to create web applications and portlets with JSF, with integrated web services support.

    JSC2 is built on the Netbeans 4.1 platform, and requires membership in the Sun Developer Network for download, which is free. Ed Burns, one of the JSF specification leads, offered these points as being of particular interest for TSS readers:
    • A collection of ready-to-use, ready-to-deploy AJAX JSF UI Components. These are usable outside of Creator in any JSF 1.1 application, though they work best with Sun's JSF implementation. These components are product quality versions of the some of the components found in the Java Blueprints Solutions Catalog and include a Google Maps component, a value-binding enabled auto-complete text field component, and a value-binding enabled progress bar component.
    • In addition to the AJAX JSF UI Components, there is also a comprehensive set of "regular" JSF UI components such as Table, Calendar, Tree, Tab Set, File Upload, and many more. These too are ready for use within and without Creator.
    • Portlet support. Java Studio Creator 2 also enables graphically building JSF based JSR-168 portlets.
    • Finally, Creator 2 bundles Sun's Java System Application Server version 8.1 Platform Edition as well as a pre-configure sample database, ready to deploy for your production environment.
    JSC2 is able to innately deploy to Tomcat, WebLogic, WebSphere, and (of course) the bundled Sun Application Server. Instructions on deploying to JBoss can be found in Dru Devore's "How to setup JBoss to work with Sun Java Studio Creator" blog entry.

    Threaded Messages (41)

  2. Inconsistent sample apps?[ Go to top ]

    I've been testing JSC2 sample apps to show it capabilities, but most of them crash trying to open "design view".
    This "basic test" could be (sure) the 1st TODO on JSC2 for most users but ... do i need a HOWTO to run sample apps?
  3. Inconsistent sample apps?[ Go to top ]

    I've been testing JSC2 sample apps to show it capabilities, but most of them crash trying to open "design view".This "basic test" could be (sure) the 1st TODO on JSC2 for most users but ... do i need a HOWTO to run sample apps?

    Worked here on the travel agency webapp, as for running it, I just pressed the run button ;-)
  4. Thanks Sun[ Go to top ]

    That thing simply is awesome.
    Exactly a filler for a huge gap in the Java world
    (Rad tool for small to medium size webapps which have to be programmed fast)

    I know there is JDeveloper but until a short while ago, there were licensing issues with ADF, which exactly prevented these kind of applications in non Oracle shops.
    (Those have been resolved for the components fortunately, thanks also to Oracle)

    I really did not like the first version of the Creator, but the Creator2 is simply awesome.
  5. Thanks Sun[ Go to top ]

    That thing simply is awesome.Exactly a filler for a huge gap in the Java world(Rad tool for small to medium size webapps which have to be programmed fast)I know there is JDeveloper but until a short while ago, there were licensing issues with ADF, which exactly prevented these kind of applications in non Oracle shops.(Those have been resolved for the components fortunately, thanks also to Oracle)I really did not like the first version of the Creator, but the Creator2 is simply awesome.

    I absolutely agree with everything you said but would also add that users who want to demo the tool better have 1024 of memory. I tried to work with on my machine (with only 512) and it couldn't handle it. I'm not saying this is that big of deal, memory is cheap and Sun even mentions it takes 1024 RAM in their requirements. However, I am curious as to why it's such a memory hog though compared to other similar IDEs.

    Mike
  6. it doesnt work..again[ Go to top ]

    thanks SUN
  7. can this be part of netbeans itself ?
  8. can this be part of netbeans itself ?[ Go to top ]

    That's something I would like to see. Afterall, Creator is now made available without charge. I don't like the idea of having so many different IDEs on my PC, and having to learn how to use them all too. It'll be nice to have just one IDE that could do everything. Perhaps that's too much to ask. ;-)

    Anyway, I'm really looking forward to NB 5.0 release more so than Creator 2, which has been in EA for far too long. Using Creator 2, I feel like I'm taking a step backwards (NB 5.0 -> 4.1). But that said, I'm still looking forward to downloading and trying out this new tool!

    Cheers,
    Adrian
    http://www.frappr.com/dukekids
  9. I absolutely agree with everything you said but would also add that users who want to demo the tool better have 1024 of memory. I tried to work with on my machine (with only 512) and it couldn't handle it. I'm not saying this is that big of deal, memory is cheap and Sun even mentions it takes 1024 RAM in their requirements. However, I am curious as to why it's such a memory hog though compared to other similar IDEs.
    I think part of this memory hog is that the application and database servers are running. If you stop them you can release
    a good amount of memory.
  10. This looks pretty nice. If someone could show us how to use Tomcat rather than the full app server for development, then this could be a quite useful tool for certain situations. Having the full appserver as the development platform seems a bit overkill for simple web apps.
  11. don't think it can be run without a full-stack application server. sun need to show their full-stack in practice, even tho it is over-kill for the majority of applications that you would use creator to develop.
  12. don't think it can be run without a full-stack application server. sun need to show their full-stack in practice, even tho it is over-kill for the majority of applications that you would use creator to develop.

    Well I have not figured that out as well (the server list only shows me the sun servers), but actually I personally do not really care, because the hot deployment seems to work rather nice.

    Given the fact, that this thing acts as a data consumer a normal tomcat probably would do it, after all JSF is not dependend on an ejb infrastructure.

    Nevertheless this thing currently is the closest program you can get as replacement for a Delphi for webapps on the java side.
  13. Given the fact, that this thing acts as a data consumer a normal tomcat probably would do it, after all JSF is not dependend on an ejb infrastructure.Nevertheless this thing currently is the closest program you can get as replacement for a Delphi for webapps on the java side.

    Although I was rather unimpressed with version 1, comments like this - a comparison to Delphi - is enough to make me want to take another look. However, the point about application server use is relevant, as Borland (the producers of Delphi) always seemed to manage to produce tools which were full-featured yet light on resources. By contrast, Sun seems to have a tendency to ship IDEs that can overwhelm the fastest workstations. When I tried Studio Creator 1 it brought back painful memories from years back of Java Workshop. I don't think that IDEs should need that much disk or memory - and bundling a full app server as default seems a bad decision if JSF wants to have an impact on the smaller web application design market, as it reinforces a belief that JSF is a 'big J2EE' technology.
  14. And is it possible to download the components only and use them
    with another server/IDE?


    Dmitry
    Coldbeans
  15. Simple Resource Test[ Go to top ]

    Just for the sake of argument, I downloaded Creator2, and gave it a quick whirl.

    I wrote a very dirty little app that calculated the used memory. Simply, the methodology was to create a new byte array in 1MB chunks until I got an exception (OutOfMemory), then I null the list holding the blocks, call System.gc() twice, and then look at Runtime.freeMemory and Runtime.maxMemory.

    I ran this using the out of the box SJAS deployment.

    I ran it and SJAS, while it launches configured for 512MB heap, was consuming 70MB. It has a couple of EAR and WARs deployed in it (nothing enormous I imagine, but I didn't look), as well as some data sources.

    I then exported the WAR file, and ran it in Tomcat 5.5 (the one shipped with Netbeans 5).

    There, the consumed memory was 14MB.

    So, SJAS seems to have a rough overhead of 56MB over pure tomcat. Mind, there may be parts that could be stripped out of the app server to lower the footprint (like the admin console). Tomcat was running with an empty Webapps directory save for my new WAR.

    Other notes.

    To run the WAR in tomcat, I had to plonk the JSTL jar from Creator into common/lib, jstl doesn't appear to be bundled with the WAR.

    Once I did that, "it just worked" and was painless.

    Also of note is that I have zero JSF or Creator experience. I dragged and dropped some static text, some fields, and a button, browsed the source code, made the "leap" that the RequestBean1 was "important", added my fields to that, "Refactor -> Encapsulate Fields" (read that somewhere about Netbeans) to make the set/getters, bound the fields to the bean, set the properties in my button action, and viola...it worked. Pretty painless.

    I have no idea what I did. But it works (and I guess that's the point).

    While SJAS has a heavier footprint than Tomcat, there's no reason I believe it needs to be as heavy as it is. You could easily drop SJAS to 256 as is, and probably even to 128 for smaller apps. I would imagine you could turn off parts to reduce the overhead as well. You probably won't be able to get it down to the level of pure Tomcat (obviously), but then, if you wanted any features beyond Tomcat, you'd have to bulk it back up.
  16. Using Tomcat[ Go to top ]

    This looks pretty nice. If someone could show us how to use Tomcat rather than the full app server for development, then this could be a quite useful tool for certain situations. Having the full appserver as the development platform seems a bit overkill for simple web apps.

    It's not ideal but if you right-click on the project in the Project Explorer then choose 'Export War', you can put your package into any directory you want, eg. deploy folder of another app server. In theory you shouldn't have to use the Sun Appserver at all then.

    Please note I haven't actually tried this, but it is recommended by Creator itself if you try and set up a new remote server.

    HTH
    Kit
  17. Using tomcat[ Go to top ]

    This looks pretty nice. If someone could show us how to use Tomcat rather than the full app server for development, then this could be a quite useful tool for certain situations. Having the full appserver as the development platform seems a bit overkill for simple web apps.

    Just go into the help and type "Tomcat". Very straightforward configuration.
  18. I downloaded it and gave it a quick go .. my first impression is that it’s refreshing to know that the tool support for JSF is finally starting to materialize. This is far superior to the release I used about 1.5 years ago. Like others, I am hoping that the default app server can be swapped out for something like Tomcat .. have not had enough time to try.

    I wish this was integrated in netbeans 5.0 .. or made available as a plug-in. I am not sure why both of these IDE’s haven’t been merged? It be would be a pity to have to have two IDE’s (netbeans and creator) open at the same time to get the best of both worlds.

    Anyways congrats to the Creator team.
  19. I downloaded it and gave it a quick go .. my first impression is that it’s refreshing to know that the tool support for JSF is finally starting to materialize.

    Actually there are lots of tools for JSF already, I am not sure if more than for Struts but definitely lots of them.
    Here is a list:

    JSF IDE
    The Eclipse JSF Project (which is in its infancy)
    Oracle JDeveloper 10g
    IBM Websphere Application Developer
    Studio Creator 2
    MyEclipse
    Exadel
    Bea (Nitrox)

    There is at least 1-2 additional Eclipse plugins which I must have missed

    Probably Borland also has something, i have not watched them too closely recently.

    Besides that every good java ide and a good xml editor should do the trick as well, just like in Struts.
  20. A lot of these so called jsf ide/plugins had wizards that added the required libs … I don’t really consider that sufficient jsf support … obvioulsy things have changed over the last 1.5 years.

    <quote>
    Besides that every good java ide and a good xml editor should do the trick as well, just like in Struts.
    </quote>

    I don't think the intent of JSF was suppose to be used without good tool support although many people have been successful. Take swing for example, you can probably create an entire application in notepad ... but most people don't. Ask any .net developer if he/she creates apps with good xml editor ... the answer is NO across the board.
  21. A lot of these so called jsf ide/plugins had wizards that added the required libs … I don’t really consider that sufficient jsf support … obvioulsy things have changed over the last 1.5 years.
    Yes indeed, only the JSF Eclipse project and Netbeans 5 are as basic as that. Even the JSF IDE has at least a pageflow Editor.
    Most tools center around a page flow editor a visual dual screen designer (semi working most of the time) and a bunch of wizards for backend bean handling.
    Some of them still have some problems due to the fact that they are based on WTP which slowly but surely these days finally becomes usable (not even version 1.0 is, but bugs are hammered out which should have been removed before 1.0)
    And some of them try the RAD approach. JSC is one of the RAD approach tools.

    There arent too many tools currently which are limited to a set of wizards and even those try to get out of the state they are in.
    <quote>Besides that every good java ide and a good xml editor should do the trick as well, just like in Struts. </quote>I don't think the intent of JSF was suppose to be used without good tool support although many people have been successful. Take swing for example, you can probably create an entire application in notepad ... but most people don't. Ask any .net developer if he/she creates apps with good xml editor ... the answer is NO across the board.

    The funny thing is, that JSF is easier to cope with without tools than Struts (which most people work with by hand) due to the fact that in many areas the xml configuration part was somehow cut down. Some frameworks try to eliminate the need for a xml toolset altogether (Seam for instance)
    But I still prefer a good set of tools and visual/half visual editors because they ease a lot of things.
  22. I don't think the intent of JSF was suppose to be used without good tool support although many people have been successful.

    I think that was the one of the main intents. At least that is my reading of the JSR proposal. There were 8 design goals in the proposal, and only one of them mentions 'tools'. To quote from the proposal:

    "Ideally an off the shelf tool would simplify high level tasks like arranging and reusing GUI components and interconnecting component state and input handling with the objects that define the application's behavior."

    In other words, it was intended that JSF would enable developers to use tools to simplify things, but this would certainly not be a requirement.

    Many developers find tools useful to simplify configuration and design in frameworks like Struts, but that does not mean that these frameworks were only intended to be used with tools.
  23. I don't think the intent of JSF was suppose to be used without good tool support although many people have been successful.
    I think that was the one of the main intents. At least that is my reading of the JSR proposal. There were 8 design goals in the proposal, and only one of them mentions 'tools'. To quote from the proposal:"Ideally an off the shelf tool would simplify high level tasks like arranging and reusing GUI components and interconnecting component state and input handling with the objects that define the application's behavior."In other words, it was intended that JSF would enable developers to use tools to simplify things, but this would certainly not be a requirement.Many developers find tools useful to simplify configuration and design in frameworks like Struts, but that does not mean that these frameworks were only intended to be used with tools.

    Your arguing a mute point. We both know that it was intented to have robust tool support to stack up against its main competitor Visual Studio .NET. JSF was designed with this in mind .. struts was not! We could argue the same thing about the java programming language .. that it's really not necessary to have sophisticated ides like netbeans, eclipse and intellij. We could all go back to using textpad. Ask yourself how these ides have become a MUST and not the … “it’s not really a requirement” that you argue. You might get by without tools .. but as the tools become better and better you'll see this less and less.
  24. We both know that it was intented to have robust tool support to stack up against its main competitor Visual Studio .NET. JSF was designed with this in mind .. struts was not!

    "Indended to have robust tool support" is not the same as "intended to be primarily used with tools", or "difficult to use without tools".
    We could argue the same thing about the java programming language .. that it's really not necessary to have sophisticated ides like netbeans, eclipse and intellij. We could all go back to using textpad.

    We could, and I am regularly astonished at the number of developers (excluding me!) who still do use simple text editors for such development.
    Ask yourself how these ides have become a MUST and not the "it's not really a requirement"; that you argue. You might get by without tools .. but as the tools become better and better you'll see this less and less.

    Sorry, but I think you are plain wrong. The IDEs are not now a "must", never have been and I hope they won't be for a long time. My experience (so far) is that GUI design tools are a poor way to put together really high quality web pages. There are so many issues of cross-browser compatibility and accessibility.

    Designing a quality internet-visible web page should not be the same as developing a GUI in Visual Basic or Delphi. (Internal websites may be a different matter). I am a great believer in GUI tools where appropriate - such as for Swing interfaces, but for most websites, I have yet to be convinced that this is appropriate.

    Until I am convinced, I will continue to develop JSF pages by hand (well, in good IDEs with JSP + XML editors) and I happen to find it easy.

    [Of course, I may be convinced when I finally get time to play with Creator 2]
  25. [Of course, I may be convinced when I finally get time to play with Creator 2]
    Somehow, I doubt it. Creator2 is a nice tool. From what I've seen, I don't think I would necessarily use it in anger for JSF unless I had severe time pressure issues, such that I needed to use its methodology for pure speed (and not out of preference.) The fact that it's built off of a (mostly) netbeans 4.1 platform means that it feels somewhat archaic -- if you've not tried out netbeans 5, you should, if only to see how it's changed -- and this affects its performance and finger feel.

    I rather agree with one of the other posters in the thread who said JSC2 should be a plugin for netbeans, rather than a complete separate installation.
  26. Probably Borland also has something, i have not watched them too closely recently.

    JBuilder has JSF support.
  27. Nice comments about bandwidth usage but clearly noone in this forum has even tried to build an app with it even with the bundled components.

    It doesnt work AT ALL
  28. Nice comments about bandwidth usage but clearly noone in this forum has even tried to build an app with it even with the bundled components.It doesnt work AT ALL

    I have not built an app yet, but the examples work fine here...
    No crash at all.
  29. Nice comments about bandwidth usage but clearly noone in this forum has even tried to build an app with it even with the bundled components.It doesnt work AT ALL
    I have not built an app yet, but the examples work fine here...No crash at all.
    Actually I have done in EA, some small web application db forms with master detail to figure the stuff out, usual Crud stuff, I did not run into severe problems in EA (while I did in EA1) and the final looks good to me, a tad faster but most of the gripes I had already were ironed out with EA2.
  30. <quote>
    It doesnt work AT ALL
    </quote>

    Non sense! Creator works very well. We just checked it out under Win and Mac (Linux to come).

    Great work Sun, NetBeans (the foundation of Creator) is becoming better and better!

    Cheers,
    Lofi.
  31. Congrats to the Java Studio Creator team with a great working JSF Development tool which also nicely works on Mac (PowerBook G4 using JDK 1.5.0_05) :o)
  32. Free software[ Go to top ]

    It would have been nice if the various components that is added to a webpage when using the tool would have been from some free (as in speach JSF) implementation.

    As I see it you can't build free software with this, unless you just use it as a simple java editor.

    Or am I wrong? I hope I am.
  33. Free software[ Go to top ]

    It would have been nice if the various components that is added to a webpage when using the tool would have been from some free (as in speach JSF) implementation.As I see it you can't build free software with this, unless you just use it as a simple java editor.Or am I wrong? I hope I am.

    Building an app in Creator and deploying to the appserver is completely free. If you're refering to Pointbase...Yes, I would think in the future that they'll switch to Derby. That's what the newer version of Netbeans bundles with if I'm not mistaken. Using another database like MySql with creator apps is not nearly as difficult as switching the app server.

    Mike
  34. Thanks Sun & Craig![ Go to top ]

    I tried Studio Creator when it came out about a year and a half ago and though it look promising it was not functional. The new version has great controls and it's quite powerful.
  35. Pair Programming[ Go to top ]

    Has anyone used the pair programming feature?
  36. Pair Programming[ Go to top ]

    Has anyone used the pair programming feature?
    I have, but not in anger - Netbeans' collaboration is actually pretty neat. Code is synchronized across accounts, so changes appear elsewhere. I haven't really pushed it, though - I don't know what happens when both sets of people modify code, nor what will happen if they modify the same lines of code. It'd be an interesting test.
  37. Wow. This is pretty slick. Using the Sun App Server slows my machine a good bit, but it's easy enough to grab the war and put it somewhere else (Tomcat).

    I was wanting to create an app with a file upload component, and doing it with myFaces (without knowing a ton more about JSF) looked pretty daunting. Creator makes me want to investigate JSF more to actually see how this stuff works.
  38. Not perfect but great RAD tool ![ Go to top ]

    I've evaluate JSC 2 and found it's a resource hunger (CPU and memory) but as a java RAD tool it just rocks !

    I've been using Elipse + MyEclipse and recently trying up Netbeans 5 but both tools won't give a such a easy way to create a web application. Maybe because I'm a fan of Borland Delphi so JSC2 works in a similar manner so I really like it.

    Off course, there's still plenty of room of improvement but it provide an easy way to build a small-mid size web application.
  39. I have installed SJSC2 on an old machine(P3,700MHz,512MB). However it was slow, I was able to run all of the samples.

    I must say that I'm very impressed by the easy-to-use user interface, and the nice looking JSF components.

    This is one more proof that Sun can make very good RADs if the really want to :-)

    It would be nice to see this feature in Netbeans.
    Hopefully, Sun won't wait untill Eclipse get there before releasing the code to Netbeans.

    Arcadius.
  40. I installed it on a P4 2.6G + 768M machine, and created a page with dynamic tree. Wow, it's like I am using a swing builder, straight forward and easy; created a WAR and deployed to SunOne WebServer 6.1, and it worked perfectly.

    This is the best IDE from sun I've ever used. I do not know if I want to use myeclipse to build JSF apps anymore (sad, I just migrated from CVS to SVN a couple days ago, but SJSC2 does not support SVN !).

    I hope SUN will upgrade the code base to NB5 very soon, it's too slow when the bundled app server is running. Allowing external web server or app server to be used for test is another option. I won't want to use it on a "P4 2G + 1G memory" machine.

    Also I wish the Tab Set component be improved a little bit so that I could place a component on the Tab Pane easily.

    hsheng
  41. Tomahawk components anyone?[ Go to top ]

    Has anyone succeeded in using an non-trivial external component library, e.g. MyFaces's Tomahawk components, with Creator2? Are the RAD-features preserved even for such a "foreign" component set?

      cheers,
      gerald
  42. Tomahawk components anyone?[ Go to top ]

    Has anyone succeeded in using an non-trivial external component library, e.g. MyFaces's Tomahawk components, with Creator2? Are the RAD-features preserved even for such a "foreign" component set?&nbsp;&nbsp;cheers,&nbsp;&nbsp;gerald

    To my knowledge not directly, at least not visually due to the fact thet JSC2 needs some extra classes and data for the visualisation. Neither myfaces or another component set currently has those RAD tool extensions integrated (they are doable because they are well documented on Suns side, but nobody has done them yet)

    So to sum it up, this stuff is doable and well documented, but no it is not done yet, you however can add the tags on source level anytime...