New object-to-service mapping article posted

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News: New object-to-service mapping article posted

  1. New object-to-service mapping article posted (4 messages)

    Xcalia (makers of XIC, the object persistence product formerly known as LiDO), has posted "Using XIC to Dynamically Orchestrate Salesforce.com's Web Services", showing the use of XIC in object-to-service mapping (aka dynamic orchestration) to map POJOs to Salesforce.com's web services.

    This is the second article with demo code (the first is a Composite HR Application Demo) to illustrate object-to-service mapping, which is the generalization of object-to-relational mapping to include anything callable from java. It is a technology that enables dynamic orchestration of services.
    The main goal of this tutorial is to map POJOs (Plain Old Java Objects) to the data hidden behind the services provided by Salesforce.com.

    The tutorial is split into two parts. In the first one, we show how to read data from Salesforce.com. In the second part, we explain how to create, update and delete Salesforce.com objects.

    The example followed in this tutorial is a simple Customer Relationship Management (CRM) application, with three types of objects: Customers (corresponding to Salesforce.com "Account" objects), Opportunities and Contacts. Each type is described with its POJO class, and then mapped to the data hidden behind Salesforce.com web service.
    What do you think about the idea of object-to-service mapping?
  2. Nice to see JDO being put to good use. Don't think you could do this with EJB3 ;)

    However, on the general case of a Java object model being driven by underlying web services, I can only see fat desktop clients being typical users of this, and they seem to be out of favour. In fact, using Salesforce again as an example, on-demand applications over the web are much more in anyway.

    On the server side, web services are much more likely to be integrated via SOA and BPM behind the web-tier. Asking coders to develop a full object model to front the service layer seems to go against the general trend of keeping as much as possible maintainable by business analysts.

    Maybe I need to think outside the box more. Are there any more natural uses for object-service mapping?

    Kit
  3. Nice to see JDO being put to good use. Don't think you could do this with EJB3 ;)

    Many established JDO vendors and now providing EJB 3.0 (or at least previews), and things are are standard in JDO are provided as 'vendor extensions' to EJB 3.0. My view is that the unification of JDO and EJB has some way to go yet.
  4. Lots of code within XML, SQL request built of concats of strings (no prepared statements)... it seriously competes with bpel as a programatic language of orchestration...

        Bruno.
  5. Lots of code within XML, SQL request built of concats of strings (no prepared statements)... it seriously competes with bpel as a programatic language of orchestration...    Bruno.

    I doubt the average service integrator sees much BPEL XML during the course of a working day, and almost certainly no SQL.

    For very specific bespoke uses, Java may be the job. But for normal business service logic and orchestration, BPEL suits an IT director's agenda much better, IMHO.

    Kit