Four new Plug-ins for Netbeans

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News: Four new Plug-ins for Netbeans

  1. Four new Plug-ins for Netbeans (24 messages)

    Sun has announced the availability of four new plugin modules for the NetBeans IDE. They are Jackpot, Real-Time Java technology, Web Services Interoperability Technology (WSIT) and Grid Compute Server for NetBeans. Jackpot (called "intelligent code re-engineering" in documentation) provides the ability to perform scriptable transformations on Java source. It also enables global source code transformations based on a comprehensive model of the project's structure. WSIT helps facilitate development of cross-platform Web services, and the Compute Server plugin is designed to help developers leverage Sun's Grid Compute Utility. The modules can be found at http://www.netbeans.org/.

    Threaded Messages (24)

  2. Wow, I can hear the crickets on news of this release. It surprises me that some developers out there still use Netbeans. Then again, some programmers still swear by vi. Anybody remember Kawa?
  3. NetBeans is pretty good, IMO[ Go to top ]

    Ahem, I still use NetBeans for both web and standalone applications. I think it's great. I suppose you're using Eclipse? I tried using it but I didn't have the plug-in that lets me load the other plug-in that is used to plug-in the IDE for Java. :oD Seriously though, as an out of the box code writing tool, Eclipse ain't so hot.
  4. NetBeans does deliver a great out-of-box experience. But I think when we compare apples to apples, the debate becomes invalid. Eclipse doesn't purport to be a shining, pretty, all-in-one solution. It's purposefully taken 90% of the way, and then allows the user to customize their environment as desired from there with inherent features, plugins and Eclipse-based IDEs like MyEclipse and others. Comes down to preference and efficiency within your own workspace at the end of the day. To me, the plugin availability for each platform is always news. Emerging open standard technologies are what drives both sides to success - in a sense a Cold War of technological excellence. But this one seems to be fought mostly with word salvos - not bombs. I hope. :-)
  5. Re: NetBeans is pretty good, IMO[ Go to top ]

    NetBeans does deliver a great out-of-box experience. But I think when we compare apples to apples, the debate becomes invalid.
    Eclipse doesn't purport to be a shining, pretty, all-in-one solution. It's purposefully taken 90% of the way, and then allows the user to customize their environment as desired from there with inherent features, plugins and Eclipse-based IDEs like MyEclipse and others.
    +1
  6. NetBeans is okay for beginners in Java I suppose. Oh, and maybe for people who create Swing apps. But I don't particularly need the candy colored buttons or wizards for my work.
  7. Re: NetBeans is pretty good, IMO[ Go to top ]

    NetBeans is okay for beginners in Java I suppose. Oh, and maybe for people who create Swing apps. But I don't particularly need the candy colored buttons or wizards for my work.
    So full J2EE support as shipped is just for beginners?
  8. Re: NetBeans is pretty good, IMO[ Go to top ]

    If you have valid points to make, and back it up with reasons why.... but not just state things and say which colors you like, as IDEs don't work better based on color of buttons.
  9. Re: NetBeans is pretty good, IMO[ Go to top ]

    NetBeans is okay for beginners in Java I suppose. Oh, and maybe for people who create Swing apps. But I don't particularly need the candy colored buttons or wizards for my work.
    I would not say that Netbeans is for beginners, it is just a good ide, with an excellent J2EE coverage.
  10. IDE wars[ Go to top ]

    It's too easy to get into religion wars over IDEs. Rather than ridiculing people who use a different IDE to you, why not just accept that people have different personal preferences? The fact of the matter is that Java now has two great open source IDEs. That's two more than .Net has, which is fantastic news. The reason NetBeans has got so good recently is the challenge thrown down by Eclipse. Sun themselves admit that if it wasn't for Eclipse, NetBeans would still be a neglected, clunky IDE with no users. Now NetBeans has thrown down a challenge to Eclipse... to respond, Eclipse has to make its tools more integrated and provide a better out-of-box experience. Eclipse is responding to the challenge with its Callisto release. Anyway, it's all good for Java developers. As for IDEA... as much as it was innovative and loved by developers, I just can't see how it can keep up with the pace now being set by Eclipse and NetBeans. JetBrains is a small company with limited resources. Perhaps if they open-sourced it...? :-)
  11. Re: IDE wars[ Go to top ]

    It's too easy to get into religion wars over IDEs. Rather than ridiculing people who use a different IDE to you, why not just accept that people have different personal preferences?

    The fact of the matter is that Java now has two great open source IDEs. That's two more than .Net has, which is fantastic news.

    The reason NetBeans has got so good recently is the challenge thrown down by Eclipse. Sun themselves admit that if it wasn't for Eclipse, NetBeans would still be a neglected, clunky IDE with no users.
    I agree, the challenge Eclipse gave to Netbeans basically drove the development into a faster pace, and given that since 4.5 Netbeans has become really good, I think the ball now is in Eclipse place.
    Now NetBeans has thrown down a challenge to Eclipse... to respond, Eclipse has to make its tools more integrated and provide a better out-of-box experience. Eclipse is responding to the challenge with its Callisto release. Anyway, it's all good for Java developers.
    Well Eclipse has to get its act together bugwise. Callisto is not a get started instantly thing. It is more like a combined plugin release with a still rough foundation (WTP) I think the main focus point where Eclipse now really has to improve is in the WTP area, this has been Eclipse weak point for years now, and still is. Netbeans definitely has the advantage in this area. Given the fact that most development currently happens server side, I can see a bright future for Netbeans until the WTP finally has stabilized to a satisfying degree.


    As for IDEA... as much as it was innovative and loved by developers, I just can't see how it can keep up with the pace now being set by Eclipse and NetBeans. JetBrains is a small company with limited resources. Perhaps if they open-sourced it...? :-)
    Well IDEA has the problem that they basically pushed Visual Fabrique which was a dead project from the beginning given the roadmap of JEE, but I would not count them out. The fabrique codebase can be pushed towards JEE 5 I assume, so I have high hopes for Version 6. Also do not count JDeveloper out yet, in many areas it is even further than Netbeans and Eclipse combined.
  12. Re: IDE wars[ Go to top ]


    Also do not count JDeveloper out yet, in many areas it is even further than Netbeans and Eclipse combined.
    JDeveloper definitely has better tools for viewing/managing databases. I wish Netbeans would catch up by providing something similar for viewing/editing schemas and editing data.
  13. Absolutely but[ Go to top ]

    I have noticed that an increasing number of developers are using a combination of these tools for different tasks. In addition to IDEA (since 2001) I'll use for Swing JFormDesigner or NetBeans. If I need to work on Web apps, I'll use Java Studio Creator or MyEclipse. Different tasks require different tools. They all have benefits and drawbacks and we should all grow up and be thankful for all the choices we have available. Competition drives innovation. Thank you IDEA, Eclipse, NetBeans, JFormDesigner and whatever tool I haven’t mentioned for making our job easier. Cheers. Aziz K.
  14. Re: Absolutely but[ Go to top ]

    I have noticed that an increasing number of developers are using a combination of these tools for different tasks.
    I know I do. Just as I don't want my cell phone to be my ipod, my camera, my pda, etc., I like tools that give me a simple straight forward way of performing my task. Harnessing the technologies is challenging enough without the tools getting in the way. Right now I switch between Eclipse (with MyEclipse) and Netbeans. With better J2EE support, I may be using Netbeans more than I have so far. Frankly I question whether its possible to develop an IDE that is great at everything. The more features that get added to an IDE (or Office product, etc.) the more complicated it usually becomes to do anything. All I ask is that my source and supporting files remain transportable.
  15. Re: IDE wars[ Go to top ]

    As for IDEA... as much as it was innovative and loved by developers, I just can't see how it can keep up with the pace now being set by Eclipse and NetBeans. JetBrains is a small company with limited resources. Perhaps if they open-sourced it...? :-)
    How would they make any profit if it was open-sourced?
  16. Re: IDE wars[ Go to top ]

    How would they make any profit if it was open-sourced?
    They probably couldn't. Like BEA and Borland before them, JetBrains are probably going to have to give up any hope of making money from IDEs - it's a commodity market now.
  17. A lot of Java newcomers I know are using Netbeans. IMHO it became much more nicer and polished, and it's pretty easy to use. That said, it misses a few niceties from IDEA which I can't live without ;), though Netbeans is moving in the right direction - 5.5beta is really awesome.
  18. where we can download them or read a more complete document about them ? Thanks
  19. Download and more Info[ Go to top ]

    More info and download links can be found at: Jackpot Real-Time Web Services Interopability Technology Compute Server/Grid Regards, Armin Wallrab, Sun Microsystems
  20. Yay for NetBeans[ Go to top ]

    As a current Eclipse/MyEclipse user, I am taking a serious look at NetBeans 5.5 beta. The E/ME combo has a super-long list of things they support, but they don't support all the things that -I- need. My primary view technology is Facelets via XHTML which is a poor editing experience under the E/ME combo. Ya, I know I can download Exadel and add that to Eclipse (a separate install of Eclipse because of plugin dependancy hell) but that seems conter to what Eclipse was supposed to be all about. No, Netbeans doesn't support Facelets either but it seems to have better server (start/restart/deploy) support than MyEclipse, better UML support and it seems faster than Eclipse and definitely lower mem footprint. I have to give up the cool spring editor but it seems to be worth it so far. So, hurray for these NetBeans plugins. I'll be hopin' for plenty more!
  21. Re: Yay for NetBeans[ Go to top ]

    As a current Eclipse/MyEclipse user, I am taking a serious look at NetBeans 5.5 beta. The E/ME combo has a super-long list of things they support, but they don't support all the things that -I- need. My primary view technology is Facelets via XHTML which is a poor editing experience under the E/ME combo. Ya, I know I can download Exadel and add that to Eclipse (a separate install of Eclipse because of plugin dependancy hell) but that seems conter to what Eclipse was supposed to be all about.

    No, Netbeans doesn't support Facelets either but it seems to have better server (start/restart/deploy) support than MyEclipse, better UML support and it seems faster than Eclipse and definitely lower mem footprint.

    I have to give up the cool spring editor but it seems to be worth it so far.

    So, hurray for these NetBeans plugins. I'll be hopin' for plenty more!
    Yes Netbeans looks more and more polished nowadays. I have been using Eclipse since 2.0 but now since I had my hands on 5.5 I probably will switch as soon as SVN support has become stable. There is so much more for my day to day usage than the combination Eclipse/ME currently has to offer. I almost switched already in 1.5 but SVN kept me from switching and now 5.5 the support still is flakey (it bombs with internal null pointers on my after project checkout) but as soon as it is there, goodbye Eclipse, unless for CSS Editing :-)
  22. Netbeans and JBoss[ Go to top ]

    I would never think about Eclipse if just Netbeans support JBoss as well as Sun Application Server.
  23. Re: Netbeans and JBoss[ Go to top ]

    I would never think about Eclipse if just Netbeans support JBoss as well as Sun Application Server.
    Looks like you are in luck! Since version 5 Netbeans supports JBoss, WebLogic and SJAS (and Tomcat for web apps). I think Websphere support may be coming too.
  24. I suspect some of you have drank of the Sun Kool-Aid with the "Out Of The Box Experience" (C) you are having with NetBeans. Wierdoes. Even more interesting is the "gauntlet" tossing conventions used by a few of you about some fictitous battle between Eclipse and Netbeans. Like Eclipse even cares about little ole Netbeanies. Microsoft's Notepad is more of a threat than NetBeans. And guess what: you can write J2EE apps with it!!!
  25. I suspect some of you have drank of the Sun Kool-Aid with the "Out Of The Box Experience" (C) you are having with NetBeans. Wierdoes.
    Netbeans supports J2EE out of the box. Eclipse requires you to download additional plugins. That's pretty easy to understand, even for an Eclipse zealot.

    Even more interesting is the "gauntlet" tossing conventions used by a few of you about some fictitous battle between Eclipse and Netbeans. Like Eclipse even cares about little ole Netbeanies. Microsoft's Notepad is more of a threat than NetBeans. And guess what: you can write J2EE apps with it!!!
    No battle between Netbeans and Eclipse? Where have you been, mate?