Discussions

News: Transforming Enterprise Java into an Enterprise Commodity

  1. Java has gone from a media and technology darling to a watermark platform in the industry. As a result, products have changed from being daring adoptions to more commoditized acquisitions - where even application servers are being repackaged and tuned for specific deployments. In this tech talk, Geir Magnusson Jr. presents 'Transforming Enterprise Java into a Commodity,' an in-depth address about what commoditization means for the Java platform and its implications for the vendor and the developer community. In this presentation, Magnusson invites Hani Suleiman, Cameron Purdy, Cedric Beust and Patrick Linskey to the stage to answer questions and foster discussion on what's to come in the Java world in 2006. Topics include Web 2.0, Ajax, ORM frameworks, mashups, EJB and POJOs. Watch Transforming Enterprise Java into an Enterprise Commodity.
  2. Geir went back to Gluecode? ;-) Later, Rob Misek Tangosol, Inc. Coherence: Bringing data to where you use it
  3. Pretty good presentation. I like this type of freeform discussion. The concentration regarding AJAX was a little disturbing though. Even though, as Cedric puts it, the browser is everywhere and people are comfortable with it, the reality is that the browsers are all non-compliant in some form or another which makes it almost impossible to assume a "universal UI device". Just look at CSS2 nightmares and all the esoteric CSS hacks you have to do to achieve a common result. And with mobile taking more and more of a shrinking budget, the assumptions with current AJAX are going to be moot and solutions will be infinitely harder to produce to blend all worlds. If the talk is about Web 2.0 evolution or whatever, I think that we need to take a look at the underlying infrastructure of what the web is in addition to all the new acronym based frameworks. HTTP and HTML are stagnant if not dead in evolutionary terms. Where is the W3C? I don't think I've seen anything but glacial progress at best on any core infrastructure topics in the past 3 to 4 years. It's like "I want HDTV but under no circumstances are we going to change NTSC/PAL". If richer browser user experiences and applications are the goal, then the underlying protocols should be more robust than they are now. Better state management across HTTP comes to mind(HTTP-NG started this but petered out) instead of all the cookie and hidden field crap we have to use now. More intrinsic dynamic nature of HTML documents would be nice instead of the club-footed ballet of Javascript/DOM manipulation. I'll pass the mic back now.
  4. I don't think it depends solely on W3C. For example, we already have a preaty good standard for creating revolutionary UIs on the web, it's called SVG. If industry (read: microsoft) had adopted this standard since its first versions years ago, we'd be working with rich thin UI in the web for quite some time already. So it doesn't depend only on new standards being defined, but them being adopted too.
  5. I don't think it depends solely on W3C. For example, we already have a preaty good standard for creating revolutionary UIs on the web, it's called SVG. If industry (read: microsoft) had adopted this standard since its first versions years ago, we'd be working with rich thin UI in the web for quite some time already. So it doesn't depend only on new standards being defined, but them being adopted too.
    Fair enough. It's not a secret that Microsoft has been a killjoy regarding a lot of technology. XAML is going to be the next chaos to be injected into the mix. However, that is what the W3C is supposed to prevent. I always assumed that the web was the biggest app server going and the self-annointed stewards (ie W3C) have an obligation to evolve the various stacks in response to trends and market forces as well as defend the baselines for those stacks. Otherwise, all this talk of a Web 2.0 is academic since we will see splinter technologies to get around the inertia of the governing body and we will get more fragmentation. Use XAML as an example. Even though one the Web 2.0 goals is to write AJAX apps because of browser ubiquity, XAML will exclude non-MS clients once again. So what good is assuming the browser as an universal application container if developers are still going to have separate deployments for each browser or at best develop to the lowest common denominator which is where we are right now.
  6. Could you please provide a video format that doesn't require installing Real Player? -- Cedric
  7. Cedric, I can't remember if you use a windows box, but if you do, try Real Alternative (http://www.codecguide.com/about_real.htm). Agreed though...RM format sucks. Cheers, Clinton
  8. I really enjoyed listening to this presentation, even though, as Frank B. previously posted, I did concentrate a little too much on the AJAX -issues. Fortunately we've managed to keep the AJAXing to a bare minimum in our firm. It helps when you have certain issues like "debugging the browser" looming ahead; no rush to get there, we've got enough non-debuggable garbage of our own ;) . The bit on EJB life cycle sounded familiar: "when it (EJB) came out everybody wanted to do EJB". In everybody I can include myself. Yeah, it was pretty cool and seemed like great idea at the time (this was actually some pre 1.0 beta/custom hack from IBM...Yep and we bought it hook and bait :) ). Looking back (not currently using any EJB) only the Session Bean (later also Message Bean) earned its weight as a useful (adds value) & maintainable (clean) back end component. Entity Beans always ended sucking hard, even when we did MDA+generate -development and never touched the actual Entity Beans (the descriptors, especially for the ORM -part, eventually got us!)... Currently I'm hoping we'd go from a patternized domain model layer + Hibernate Persistence API to the new JPA and maybe bring back Session Beans too... first schedule a time to evaluate of course. -I ps. Listen to what "Male Speaker 7" has to say and what the transcript says.. Was the transcript ran through Office Speech Recognition or was it just the accent..? :)
  9. My favorite quote: "What we are going to do in the following 47 minutes is have an hour of community discussion " :)
  10. My favorite quote:
    "What we are going to do in the following 47 minutes is have an hour of community discussion " :)
    Yes! Just like the title says enterprise into enterprise for enterprise... and under the covers it's just an hour of 47 minutes. P.
  11. My favorite quote:
    "What we are going to do in the following 47 minutes is have an hour of community discussion " :)
    I am sure Einstein would have something to say about this.