Free Algorithms Book online

Discussions

News: Free Algorithms Book online

  1. Free Algorithms Book online (8 messages)

    Kevin Dangoor posted a reference to "Algorithms," a book whose draft is online and readily available. The book summarizes the algorithms in fairly useful pseudocode, and is useful because, as Mr. Dangoor says, "you never know when you’ll need a different algorithm." What other books on algorithms have you found useful? What format is most useful to you: pseudocode (as in this book), or actual language implementations? What kinds of algorithms do you typically look for in such references?

    Threaded Messages (8)

  2. Another Algorithms Book[ Go to top ]

    Published by John Wiley and Sons "Arithmetic and Logic in Computer Systems" IMO, actual language implementations is most useful, http://www.developerzone.biz/
  3. Re: Free Algorithms Book online[ Go to top ]

    Kevin Dangoor posted a reference to "Algorithms," a book whose draft is online and readily available. The book summarizes the algorithms in fairly useful pseudocode, and is useful because, as Mr. Dangoor says, "you never know when you’ll need a different algorithm."

    What other books on algorithms have you found useful? What format is most useful to you: pseudocode (as in this book), or actual language implementations? What kinds of algorithms do you typically look for in such references?
    I have used "Algorithms in C" by Robert Sedgwick (Addison Wesley) in the past. As a non-mathematician, I found it particularly useful as its descriptions were more pictorial and less mathematical than found in most algorithms books. Kit
  4. Re: Free Algorithms Book online[ Go to top ]

    Kevin Dangoor posted a reference to "Algorithms," a book whose draft is online and readily available. The book summarizes the algorithms in fairly useful pseudocode, and is useful because, as Mr. Dangoor says, "you never know when you’ll need a different algorithm."

    What other books on algorithms have you found useful? What format is most useful to you: pseudocode (as in this book), or actual language implementations? What kinds of algorithms do you typically look for in such references?


    I have used "Algorithms in C" by Robert Sedgwick (Addison Wesley) in the past. As a non-mathematician, I found it particularly useful as its descriptions were more pictorial and less mathematical than found in most algorithms books.

    Kit
    Yes. Sedgewick's book is a classic. It's been in my collection for about 7 years now.
  5. Re: Free Algorithms Book online[ Go to top ]

    What other books on algorithms have you found useful? What format is most useful to you: pseudocode (as in this book), or actual language implementations? What kinds of algorithms do you typically look for in such references?
    I think that a lot of IT folks, who have a degree, had to use "Introduction to Algorithms" at university. But it's very formal and this free book would be more interesting to read. Nowdays programmers dont need to implement low level algorithms like sorting and searching. But for those who participate in coding contests like TopCoder, this book would be very valuable.
  6. Re: Free Algorithms Book online[ Go to top ]

    Nowdays programmers dont need to implement low level algorithms like sorting and searching. But for those who participate in coding contests like TopCoder, this book would be very valuable.
    However, programmers DO need to develop the ability to solve problems. The mathematical approach of Algorithms books provide a formal framework that programmers can and should use to solve their own algorithmic puzzles. I often find that those who can solve the hard algorithms problems in school are the same people who can find 5 different solutions to a same problem. A skill that is quite useful when there are outside limiting factors that may make 4 out of the 5 known solutions impractical! (A common occurrence in software development) So.. I wouldn't say that learning "low level" algorithms like sorting and searching are not necessary to learn. I'd say its essential to study these approaches so that your mind is able to find solutions when you see new unsolved problems.
  7. Re: Free Algorithms Book online[ Go to top ]

    Nowdays programmers dont need to implement low level algorithms like sorting and searching. But for those who participate in coding contests like TopCoder, this book would be very valuable.
    Implementing sorting and searching are just the introductory problems that everyone can understand without domain-specific knowledge. Don't let never having had to code your own merge sort lead you to think that understanding algorithms is just a trick for coding competitions. I believe that two simple skills could save many developers from hours of unnecessary work and rework: 1) Estimating the algorithmic complexity and runtime characteristics of a block of code 2) Recognizing NP-complete problems in the wild. The first should be obvious. If more developers could recognize that they were coding O(n^3) algorithms in critical code there would be far fewer five-alarm performance emergencies. The second is often overlooked. I have seen reasonably good coders who burned days (or longer) trying to solve the Traveling Salesman Problem (or equivalent) efficiently. Of course, they either bang their heads on the wall until someone lets them in on the secret or they come up with a clever general "solution" that doesn't work. I even ran into one who refused to listen when I explained the issue and complained to the boss that I was insulting his abilities. There are ways of working around the nastiness on specific instances of the problem, but only if they could recognize that they were facing an NP-complete problem in the first place. Vince Frisina
  8. Re: Free Algorithms Book online[ Go to top ]

    Comment on the book: Shouldn't the introduction include theta, omega and little-o as well as just big-O?
  9. Free Algorithms Book online[ Go to top ]

    Kevin Dangoor posted a reference to "Algorithms," a book whose draft is online and readily available. The book summarizes the algorithms in fairly useful pseudocode, and is useful because, as Mr. Dangoor says, "you never know when you’ll need a different algorithm." What other books on algorithms have you found useful? What format is most useful to you: pseudocode (as in this book), or actual language implementations? What kinds of algorithms do you typically look for in such references?