Discussions

Reviews: Software: SlickEdit 11.0.2

  1. Software: SlickEdit 11.0.2 (18 messages)

    This is a review of SlickEdit 11.0.2, deployed on Solaris 9 and Windows XP. It was also installed on Linux (a system running Debian) but this review only focuses on Solaris and Windows, with most of the focus on XP. SlickEdit is, at heart, a text editor. It has trappings that make its use in editing projects easier - such as build modes, project version control support, tag files, suggestions, and syntax highlighting - but it's really designed and targeted specifically at editing text. At its core task, it's a monster. SlickEdit is a commercial product. It has trial versions available from the web site, and it can be purchased for $284USD without media, and for $299 with media. Installation is very smooth. Installation is largely without options, and provides a working executable. On first run, users can choose to create tag files for C/C++, C#, Java, and COBOL. Users also choose an interface, from among CUA, the text-version of SlickEdit, Brief, vim, emacs, ISPF (a surprise) and some others. After that, startup is very quick. SlickEdit's text editing functions are very complete. It has toolbars specifically for the support of various languages and grammars, such as XML, Java, yacc, and others; setting up a project allows specification of versions so that custom builds can be selected for debug and release versions, which is a feature more likely to be used by C and C++ projects than Java, but it's still handy. Does SlickEdit compare to the powerhouse IDEs that Java has? Yes, and no. As a Java IDE, SlickEdit doesn't really match up feature for feature, although its text-editing features are easier to use and match what programmers are used to seeing in "pure" text editors. It doesn't have Java-specific features like GUI editors, deployment tools, or other things like that, although it can certainly invoke external processes for these functions. That said, it's not marketed as an IDE. SlickEdit is targeted specifically at editing text, and this reviewer has found it an invaluable tool for this purpose. Its memory impact is small (34MB, compared to the 220MB for a single process in an IDE) and it's very fast and has excellent finger-feel (depending on your choice of user interface, of course, although the interfaces are customizable if the norms don't match what you prefer.) SlickEdit's support structure seems very good. I had no problems interacting with support staff while looking for specific features; it turns out that despite not having looked very well for it in the online help (where the answers were), the staff was very helpful. In addition, SlickEdit has a set of community forums aimed at SlickEdit, Slick-C (the programming language internal to SlickEdit) and two other editions of SlickEdit: SlickEdit Plugin for Eclipse and SlickEdit Tools for MS Visual Studio 2005. The forums are well-populated, and many SlickEdit users are dedicated to the product and its support, making the community useful and responsive. All in all, the product is excellent. While it's not going to replace a Java IDE for most programmers, it's certainly valuable; this reviewer has a copy running for almost all incidental text edits on each of his servers and development boxes. Joseph Ottinger is the editor-in-chief of TheServerSide.com, and has extensive experience in server-side technologies ranging from Perl to Cold Fusion to C/C++ and Java.

    Threaded Messages (18)

  2. what for?[ Go to top ]

    As a java programmer, i cant see any reason to buy that thing. First its not an IDE as you mentioned. So its definitely not very competitive for java projects at least when you compare it to IDEA or something. Then there would be the text-editor argument, but hell, i wont pay 200+ bucks for a text editor. There is UltraEdit for Win or Textmate for Mac OS X, they are in the range of 60$ right? And both are pretty powerful in editing text. Perhaps it works out for people who wanna do C and Java development with one tool, but even for this group i would tend to argument that the "one fits all" is not the best option. Marc Logemann http://www.logemann.org
  3. Re: what for?[ Go to top ]

    As a java programmer, i cant see any reason to buy that thing. First its not an IDE as you mentioned. So its definitely not very competitive for java projects at least when you compare it to IDEA or something. Then there would be the text-editor argument, but hell, i wont pay 200+ bucks for a text editor. There is UltraEdit for Win or Textmate for Mac OS X, they are in the range of 60$ right? And both are pretty powerful in editing text. Perhaps it works out for people who wanna do C and Java development with one tool, but even for this group i would tend to argument that the "one fits all" is not the best option.

    Marc Logemann
    http://www.logemann.org
    I agree. I think one way to get users to use slick edit would be to make a strip down version available for free. Once you give a taste of your editor to the users then you can expect some of them to buy a paid version. But asking everyone to pay at the begining is a tough sell in the world of Eclipse and Netbeans and other editors for simple text. I used to extensively make use of slick edit when it was in version 6 and 7 stages. but then eclipse and textpad are free and best options i have now. Sorry slick edit :)
  4. Re: what for?[ Go to top ]

    As a java programmer, i cant see any reason to buy that thing. First its not an IDE as you mentioned. So its definitely not very competitive for java projects at least when you compare it to IDEA or something. Then there would be the text-editor argument, but hell, i wont pay 200+ bucks for a text editor. There is UltraEdit for Win or Textmate for Mac OS X, they are in the range of 60$ right? And both are pretty powerful in editing text. Perhaps it works out for people who wanna do C and Java development with one tool, but even for this group i would tend to argument that the "one fits all" is not the best option.

    Marc Logemann
    http://www.logemann.org
    Because the editors you mentioned are not really powerful, compared to the heavyweight ones like emacs or slickedit. Editors like these are usually built on some script languages, and thus extremely extensible - more than the plugins. For example, you could write a small piece of script in emacs-lisp or slick-c to add or update the header copyright comments to all your code files, probably with user interaction via editor's UI. Some of the scripts could even communicate on internet or build GUI window/dialog boxes. However, they've been lacking behind the advanced java IDEs for many years. With the new platforms like eclipse and netbeans getting more and more support, there isn't any reason for newbies to go for them now.
  5. Long time SlickEdit user[ Go to top ]

    Hi, I've been using Visual SlickEdit since the 2.x version on OS/2 in 1996, having come from its predecessor, the IBM-internal "E" family of editors before that. I spent most of every working day using SlickEdit for seven or eight years. My personal macro file is about 4,000 lines. I've had licences for it on variously, OS/2, AIX, Windows and Linux. I switched to IDEA for Java stuff in 2003 -- that was the first time I found an "IDE" that was better than SlickEdit, and even then it is only for specifically Java stuff. (Martin Fowler refers to the "Post IntelliJ era".) I still use SlickEdit daily for Ruby, SQL and various other files. The editing power of it is amazing, and it's damn fast. SlickEdit was at its strongest in the versions through to about 7. During that time they were adding more features than bugs, and every new release was exciting and pushed the envelope. These days there are still some new features being added, most notably Ruby support in the latest release. But the features aren't as solid or impressive or as well-designed as they used to be. Sometimes they just plain don't work. It could be because the husband-and-wife team that started the company divorced a few years ago, and seem to spend a lot of energy on court battles now. All said though it is still my editor of choice for many things, and I happily continue to pay my maintenance and support fee every year. John Hurst Wellington, New Zealand
  6. Re: Software: SlickEdit 11.0.2[ Go to top ]

    I can't think of switching from TextPad. Its just so cool and no frills editor.
  7. Just use JEdit[ Go to top ]

    JEdit can do everything SlickEdit can do and its free. I wouldn't suggest using either for code development, as there is probably a better IDE for the language you using (Eclipse, NetBeans, Visual Studio, etc). Check it out: http://www.jedit.org And before somebody tries to say "it's not as good as SlickEdit", supply an actual example of a feature that is missing.
  8. Re: Just use JEdit[ Go to top ]

    JEdit can do everything SlickEdit can do and its free. I wouldn't suggest using either for code development, as there is probably a better IDE for the language you using (Eclipse, NetBeans, Visual Studio, etc). Check it out:

    http://www.jedit.org

    And before somebody tries to say "it's not as good as SlickEdit", supply an actual example of a feature that is missing.
    - C++ refactorying - 3-way file diff - Integration with MSDN help. - Auto-complete and class browser for .NET and C++ - Debug .NET and native windows/linux programs .....
  9. Re: Just use JEdit[ Go to top ]

    - 3-way file diff
    diff plugin
    - C++ refactorying
    - Integration with MSDN help.
    - Auto-complete and class browser for .NET and C++
    - Debug .NET and native windows/linux programs
    .....
    These are all programming functions that Visual Studio does better than SlickEdit. Like I said before, I wouldn't use SlickEdit for programming since there is an IDE out there that is better.
  10. Re: Just use JEdit[ Go to top ]

    Everybody has his favorite editor, and only the foolish or the brave try to convert a programmer to a different one. :-) It's not just about features. This editor handles the big jobs. For example, I just opened a 1.5GB (yes that's Giga) file on my laptop, with 1GB RAM. The file opens instantly. It scrolls to the bottom instantly. It takes a little while (about a minute) to calculate the number of lines in the file (4,751,812), or to navigate to the 1,000,000th line (about ten seconds), but it does it. I tried to open the file in jEdit and it says "There was insufficient Java heap memory to complete the request". No kidding. "Try increasing the maximum heap size." Hmmm. Another thing SlickEdit does really well is vertical selections. I marked a random vertical slice through my large file and searched for string in it. SlickEdit instantly navigates to each match, tens of thousands of lines at time. This is great for log files. Don't ask it to sort a 4M line file. But I loaded a 40,000 line file, marked a vertical selection and sorted. About 2 seconds. Make some changes. Press undo a few times. Quick response, even undoing the sort almost instantly. This speed and functionality has been in it for years, and you get used to it. John Hurst Wellington, New Zealand
  11. Re: Just use JEdit[ Go to top ]

    For example, I just opened a 1.5GB
    I wrote an extension for JEdit that handles large files easily (had a need for it last year on a project where I had files over 12GB in size). When I get a chance I'll clean it up and put it out there. Until then you can either: (1) use one of the several free tools out there that breaks up large files or merges pieces or (2) use UltraEdit. UltraEdit can handle big files just fine and is still way cheaper than SlickEdit.
  12. Re: Just use JEdit[ Go to top ]

    JEdit can do everything SlickEdit can do and its free. I wouldn't suggest using either for code development, as there is probably a better IDE for the language you using (Eclipse, NetBeans, Visual Studio, etc). Check it out:

    http://www.jedit.org

    And before somebody tries to say "it's not as good as SlickEdit", supply an actual example of a feature that is missing.
    The most important one: VI key bindings.
  13. Re: Just use JEdit[ Go to top ]

    JEdit can do everything SlickEdit can do and its free. [..] And before somebody tries to say "it's not as good as SlickEdit", supply an actual example of a feature that is missing.
    Having used both extensively (each as a primary editor for at least a year), I can safely say that they are not even in the same universe. I'm not going to diss jEdit, but I can definitely compliment VSE. However, the utility of either to the "typical" Java developer has been diminished by workable IDEs such as IDEA. I no longer use VSE, and although it was limitless in its power (thanks to its "built in its own self" scriptability), I honestly don't feel like I need it now. I have also uninstalled jEdit, and I do not miss it either. Peace, Cameron Purdy Tangosol Coherence: Clustered Shared Memory for Java
  14. Re: Just use JEdit[ Go to top ]

    I can safely say that they are not even in the same universe.
    And despite all that experience with both tools you are were unable to give a single example of where SlickEdit was superior.
  15. Re: Just use JEdit[ Go to top ]

    I can safely say that they are not even in the same universe.


    And despite all that experience with both tools you are were unable to give a single example of where SlickEdit was superior.
    Stan, what is your interest in this? I have nothing to gain or lose from this. All I know about these products is that for years VSE was fun to use and did everything I needed in a way that was simple and obvious and dependable, while JEdit was painful to use and I was honestly happy to uninstall it. Isn't my opinion as an actual long-term user of each worth more than a list of features? Peace, Cameron Purdy Tangosol Coherence: The Java Data Grid
  16. SlickEdit will never replace a full-featured, Java-centric IDE for me (I'm completely happy with Eclipse), but it is an excellent tool for other tasks. Column-edit mode and regex search-and-replace are probably the most useful features IMHO and I can create custom SQL reporting scripts, XML import files and config sets in very short order with Slickedit.
  17. Column-edit mode and regex search-and-replace are probably the most useful features IMHO and I can create custom SQL reporting scripts, XML import files and config sets in very short order with Slickedit.
    And you can do all those in JEdit too.
  18. Editplus is the best!?
  19. PSPad[ Go to top ]

    I discovered PSPad on the front of a mag recently. I have to say, it is VERY impressive. I used to use Ultraedit and PSPad does everything that UE did at zero cost. Kudos to the PSPad creators. Kit