What's New in Seam 1.1

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News: What's New in Seam 1.1

  1. What's New in Seam 1.1 (56 messages)

    As Gavin announced today, Seam 1.1 finally reaches GA status. Seam 1.1 is compatible with applications developed for Seam 1.0 with one small exception. Hence, an upgrade is recommended for all Seam users. Please read Gavin's announcement and his earlier interview with infoq for the full details of Seam 1.1. But for the impatient, here are some highlights: * Seam 1.1 provides a RoR-like application generator called Seam Gen. It generates complete Seam projects, with all necessarily configuration files and build scripts. So, you can get started with Seam in no time. Better yet, the generated projects can be opened directly in NetBeans and Eclipse with the build / deploy process fully integrated into the IDE. * With Seam 1.1, you can write "pure POJO" applications that have no dependency on EJB3 (although EJB3 components are still recommended for the additional container services and standard compliance). As a result, you can now deploy Seam applications in J2EE 1.4 application servers. As of Seam 1.1, Seam has been tested on JBoss AS 4.0.5 (with or without the EJB3 module), JBoss AS 5.0 beta, WebLogic 9.2, Glassfish v1, and Tomcat 5.5.17. * Seam 1.1 provides a CRUD application framework that allows you to develop the entire data access layer of your application declaratively. You can either wire together Seams built-in data access components in the components.xml file (Spring-like programming without the Java/XML repetition), or use Java code to extend those built-in components (no application logic in XML). All queries can be declaratively constructed and reused throughout the application. * AJAX has always been a strong point of Seam. But in Seam 1.1, Seam now works with leading AJAX frameworks such as Ajax4jsf and icefaces out of the box (see the official example apps). For those who prefer to do AJAX with raw JavaScript, Seam JavaScript Remoting is also enhanced with a new concurrency model at the backend. * If you are JSF developer, Seam have always provided great enhancements to JSF (e.g., RESTful pages, end-to-end validation with Hibernate validators). Now with Seam 1.1, Seam continues this tradition with more useful JSF components (especially for input validation and page cache) as well as an expanded JSF EL. For more Seam 1.1 features, please refer to Gavin's blog post. So, what do Y'all think about all these? Please let us know if there are new features you'd like to see in Seam or ideas on how to make Seam even more friendly to developers. Thanks in advance!

    Threaded Messages (56)

  2. 6 months[ Go to top ]

    I am using Seam about 6 months now... 2 year ago, I make my first webapp with ASP.NET... I loved the concept... 1 year ago, I started my second webapp, this time using Java with Spring/JSP/JSTL... I loved it too, but dislike all servlet and JSP style from MVC... 8 months ago, I decided move to JSF any costs and figured out that Spring was not so integrated with JSF the way it was with other view techs and that EJB3 was nice (my app really didn't need many of Spring features). That time, Seam took my attention... Since that (version 1.0.beta2), I realize the power of concept and how simple and beautiful a webapp could be. Now, with ICEfaces enter the same game (I loved Tomahawk, but is not the same), I am very happy with all aspects my apps need now of Java EE... I recommend anyone using JSF to try Seam (is a so obvious improvement)... anyone making Webapp should consider the option to move... and so on... My two cents... Thanks,
  3. Just ran examples on Resin[ Go to top ]

    I just ran a hibernate example on Resin with minor modifications ('standard' resin compatibility workaround).
  4. Re: Just ran examples on Resin[ Go to top ]

    I just ran a hibernate example on Resin with minor modifications ('standard' resin compatibility workaround).
    Nice, that's really good to know :)
  5. Re: Just ran examples on Resin[ Go to top ]

    Fantastic. I used Resin a couple of years ago and really liked it back then. Did you try the "jpa" or the "hibernate2" examples? We will add a resin build target for the those examples. Michael
  6. Ran hibernate examples[ Go to top ]

    I tried 'hibernate' examples. I used tomcat deployment targets. Basically the workaround was what I did is made web.xml resin 'compliant' - i.e. just made the name space empty () and added resin-web.xml where I declared to use apache xml parser (which I also added to lib web-inf/lib dir). In the example I managed to create a user, login and navigate through several pages - everything seemed running flawlessly and fast. I am trying to convert a small part of my big facelets/ajax4jsf project to use seam, I am very curious how that will go. Since jboss micro container is used my wild guess is that not only hibernate but also 'the usual' ejb3 would run.
  7. Re: Ran hibernate examples[ Go to top ]

    ... ...Since jboss micro container is used my wild guess is that not only hibernate but also 'the usual' ejb3 would run.
    Yes, that is correct. Good luck and let us know how it goes. Thanks. :)
  8. ... ...Since jboss micro container is used my wild guess is that not only hibernate but also 'the usual' ejb3 would run.


    Yes, that is correct. Good luck and let us know how it goes. Thanks. :)
    Only managed to run the hibernate examples so far. Running other examples (booking) causes reflection exceptions on javax.ejb.Local.value() Still better than nothing! :)
  9. ... ...Since jboss micro container is used my wild guess is that not only hibernate but also 'the usual' ejb3 would run.


    Yes, that is correct. Good luck and let us know how it goes. Thanks. :)


    Only managed to run the hibernate examples so far. Running other examples (booking) causes reflection exceptions on javax.ejb.Local.value()
    Still better than nothing! :)
    I think you are probably missing some JARs for the embedded ejb3 to work. Try build the "ant tomcat" target for the booking example and see if it deploys in Resin. :)
  10. used tomcat.deploy[ Go to top ]

    ... ...Since jboss micro container is used my wild guess is that not only hibernate but also 'the usual' ejb3 would run.


    Yes, that is correct. Good luck and let us know how it goes. Thanks. :)


    Only managed to run the hibernate examples so far. Running other examples (booking) causes reflection exceptions on javax.ejb.Local.value()
    Still better than nothing! :)


    I think you are probably missing some JARs for the embedded ejb3 to work. Try build the "ant tomcat" target for the booking example and see if it deploys in Resin. :)
    Not sure, ant tomcat.deploy is what I used.
  11. Just ran JPA examples on Resin[ Go to top ]

    Fantastic. I used Resin a couple of years ago and really liked it back then. Did you try the "jpa" or the "hibernate2" examples? We will add a resin build target for the those examples.

    Michael
    Just alittle update - JPA example also works!
  12. I have a question for you Ciro[ Go to top ]

    It's been a year since your post. Has your opinion changed? Have you been successful with Seam? What tools do you use in your Seam development? I would much appreciate if you shared your experience on Seam development with those who is not sure whether Seam is the way to go. please contact me for any further discussion: ibalashov_please_remove_this_spam_line_gmail.com Thanks,
  13. nice but[ Go to top ]

    i will give a try to seam, seriously.. --- a little off topic complaint --- Something bothers me from the beginning of Hibernate. it has too many useless dependencies. i mean they say use the thirdparty.jar for the seam, it is friking 5 megabytes. Why there is a dependency to dom4j if there is annotations now.. You use one or two class from commons collections AFAIK, why the whole library is required? list goes on.. i wish hibernate could be slimmer. Many of the stuff you use already available in Java5.. fork the project and switch to Java5 code in core hibernate please..
  14. Re: nice but[ Go to top ]

    ...Something bothers me from the beginning of Hibernate. it has too many useless dependencies. i mean they say use the thirdparty.jar for the seam, it is friking 5 megabytes ...
    Well, if you use JBoss AS, you need no 3rd party JARs for Seam or Hibernate (you do need facelets JARs if you want to use it). But I know that is not what you are asking. :) To include the entire 3rd party JARs is for maintainance reasons -- when apache releases a new commons JAR, we can just add it instead of trying to figuring out what has changed exactly. On the other hand, the large dependency JARs have minimal impact at runtime -- the classes you do not need are not loaded anyway. It would be nice if there is an automated tool to get rid of all "unecessary" classes from the dependency JARs.
  15. Re: nice but[ Go to top ]

    Something bothers me from the beginning of Hibernate. it has too many useless dependencies. i mean they say use the thirdparty.jar for the seam, it is friking 5 megabytes. Why there is a dependency to dom4j if there is annotations now.. You use one or two class from commons collections AFAIK, why the whole library is required? list goes on.. i wish hibernate could be slimmer. Many of the stuff you use already available in Java5.. fork the project and switch to Java5 code in core hibernate please..
    Believe me, no-one hates the dependencies as much as me, but unfortunately they are all there for a "good" reason. We can't just kick out dom4j.jar, for example, because its not all annotations, we still need to be able to parse persistence.xml, orm.xml, etc. We probably could fork the needed classes out of commons-collections into the Hibernate codebase, but that is pretty much the only case where we could do this, and it would not significantly reduce the "weight" of the Hibernate dependencies.
  16. Re: nice but[ Go to top ]

    Something bothers me from the beginning of Hibernate. it has too many useless dependencies. i mean they say use the thirdparty.jar for the seam, it is friking 5 megabytes. Why there is a dependency to dom4j if there is annotations now.. You use one or two class from commons collections AFAIK, why the whole library is required? list goes on.. i wish hibernate could be slimmer. Many of the stuff you use already available in Java5.. fork the project and switch to Java5 code in core hibernate please..


    Believe me, no-one hates the dependencies as much as me, but unfortunately they are all there for a "good" reason. We can't just kick out dom4j.jar, for example, because its not all annotations, we still need to be able to parse persistence.xml, orm.xml, etc. We probably could fork the needed classes out of commons-collections into the Hibernate codebase, but that is pretty much the only case where we could do this, and it would not significantly reduce the "weight" of the Hibernate dependencies.
    Gavin please do it, move the dependencies into a non colliding namespace, it is really a burden to keep all the deps in sync with projects using hibernate (ant to an even worse degree jboss embedded and seam), it is less the problem of having all these jars (60 or so, whatever the number of jars in a Seam project used to be way over the top) and the codesize, but you run often into conflicts with other jars or the same jars needed in different versions. A baselib and such are seam and hibernate to a big degree should not have too many dependencies into outside jars, none if possible.
  17. Re: nice but[ Go to top ]

    Just to clarify: very few jars are needed when you are running Seam in an EE environment. The jars are needed for: (1) integration testing with SeamTest (a pretty unique feature of Seam) (2) deployment of Seam applications to Tomcat Anyway, I hear the concerns, and we'll have *yet another* think about this stuff.
  18. ok..[ Go to top ]

    Believe me, no-one hates the dependencies as much as me, but unfortunately they are all there for a "good" reason. We can't just kick out dom4j.jar, for example, because its not all annotations, we still need to be able to parse persistence.xml, orm.xml, etc. We probably could fork the needed classes out of commons-collections into the Hibernate codebase, but that is pretty much the only case where we could do this, and it would not significantly reduce the "weight" of the Hibernate dependencies.
    Well, you don't need to use Dom4j at all, you can use java Dom sax whatever libraries. For other libraries, take a good looking, you will see a lot of things you don't really need..
  19. Re: nice but[ Go to top ]

    i will give a try to seam, seriously..
    --- a little off topic complaint ---
    Something bothers me from the beginning of Hibernate. it has too many useless dependencies. i mean they say use the thirdparty.jar for the seam, it is friking 5 megabytes. Why there is a dependency to dom4j if there is annotations now.. You use one or two class from commons collections AFAIK, why the whole library is required? list goes on.. i wish hibernate could be slimmer. Many of the stuff you use already available in Java5.. fork the project and switch to Java5 code in core hibernate please..
    I've made my own Hibernate distribution that includes all dependencies inline under org.hibernate.thirdparty.* Works really well in a Maven environment where I can now just depend on hibernate-core and hibernate-jpa and be done with it. S.
  20. Re: nice but[ Go to top ]

    I've made my own Hibernate distribution that includes all dependencies inline under org.hibernate.thirdparty.* Works really well in a Maven environment where I can now just depend on hibernate-core and hibernate-jpa and be done with it.
    Can you submit your build scripts for that distribution library to the Hibernate Wiki or JIRA? I think this would be useful for other Hibernate users. Thanks
  21. Re:What's New in Seam 1.1[ Go to top ]

    I'm very like the project,I will try on it and hope It will truly simplify my develop work.
  22. Re: What's New in Seam 1.1[ Go to top ]

    Well, initial technical review of Seam back when it started, negative because of the dependency on JBoss JEE server. Now, I appreciate the effort with making Seam feasible with "other" software stacks. Will, put it back as a viable candidate for the next project. Gavin, have met considerable resistance from fellow developers because Seam "seems" to be a JBoss lock-in proposition.
  23. Re: What's New in Seam 1.1[ Go to top ]

    Gavin, have met considerable resistance from fellow developers because Seam "seems" to be a JBoss lock-in proposition.
    Yes, some people have seen it this way, but that was never the intent. We really genuinely want to people to be able to use this on any platform, just as we've always been committed to multi-platform support for other products like Hibernate and jBPM - both of which are part of the "pedigree" of Seam. Remember, Seam doesn't come from nowhere - it evolved out of the Hibernate and jBPM communities and shares many of the same values as these venerable projects ;-) Anyway, we made a big effort this time around to "prove" that we mean what we say by: (1) bundling new example applications that run on GlassFish and WebLogic (WebSphere in the next release) (2) offering commercial support (up to the platinum level) for other platforms (initially GlassFish, WebLogic, WebSphere and Tomcat) The support will be available in the new year, so don't call sales just yet ;-) Remember, the minute we start selling support for Seam on WebLogic, we have no choice but to continue to support WebLogic indefinitely. It keeps us honest :-) Cheers
  24. Re: Seam on other platforms[ Go to top ]

    Anyway, we made a big effort this time around to "prove" that we mean what we say by:

    (1) bundling new example applications that run on GlassFish and WebLogic (WebSphere in the next release)
    (2) offering commercial support (up to the platinum level) for other platforms (initially GlassFish, WebLogic, WebSphere and Tomcat)

    The support will be available in the new year, so don't call sales just yet ;-)

    Remember, the minute we start selling support for Seam on WebLogic, we have no choice but to continue to support WebLogic indefinitely. It keeps us honest :-)
    I applaud you guys on this effort. It's good to see Seam move beyond the JBoss AS; I think it's growing into quite a strong product. -- Kito D. Mann - Author, JavaServer Faces in Action http://www.JSFCentral.com - JavaServer Faces FAQ, news, and info * Sign up for the JSF Central newsletter! http://oi.vresp.com/?fid=ac048d0e17 *
  25. Re: What's New in Seam 1.1[ Go to top ]

    This rocks! I am looking the "New Stack". To date I have been primarily focussed on Struts with Hibernate (and some Spring), but it seems that some new choices are emerging. Can anyone comment on the value proposition comparison between: 1. SEAM 2. SHALE 3. JSF with Spring 4. Portal 5. Other? I am usually fettered by the "Enterprise Architecture" of a given client, which relates to a WAS or WLS runtime, not always the current relase (i.e. WAS 6.0 & WLS 8.x is pretty good for 2006). As well, things need to run under AIX and Solaris (not necessarily the latest release) as well as Linux or Windoze for DEV. If anyone has already prototyped for the same type of environments it would great to hear some feedback. In the case of WAS, I may be able to "guide" clients to Apache Geronimo since IBM has a support offering and has named it similar to WAS! My 2 questions: (0) Will SEAM support be available for WLS 8.x? (1) Will SEAM support be available for Apache Geronimo? (2) Any plans for a book similar to the Hiby books? Thanks and keep up the great work, David. David Hauser Principal, Bits In Glass Inc. http://www.bitsinglass.com/
  26. Re: What's New in Seam 1.1[ Go to top ]

    Can anyone comment on the value proposition comparison between: 1. SEAM 2. SHALE 3. JSF with Spring 4. Portal 5. Other?
    I don't like to do such comments. All I can say is: * take a couple of the Seam examples (booking, contactlist, dvdstore) and port them to some other framework (Java or even RoR if you like). Observe the end result. * for fairness, take an example from the other framework, and port it back. Observe the end result. Seriously, go and do it. If you think that Seam might be interesting to you, then you owe it to yourself. It is the only way to really see what Seam brings to the table.
    (0) Will SEAM support be available for WLS 8.x?
    We are still figuring out the details of this, but the answer, conditionally, is "yes, sometime in the new year". Ditto for WAS and GlassFish.
    (1) Will SEAM support be available for Apache Geronimo?
    We could maybe do developer support. But being able to provide production support means costs on our side in testing and running a QA environment, and Geronimo doesn't have the level of adoption and maturity to make that worthwhile and cost-effective for us.
    (2) Any plans for a book similar to the Hiby books?
    Michael Yuan has written a short book on Seam, that is available on O'Reilly roughcuts. Apparently this is the hottest-selling book on roughcuts, they said its going faster than early RoR books. Norman Richards and I plan to work on a longer book sometime next year. I have heard of one other book in the works. There is also a single chapter about Seam in JPwH, which talks about how Seam relates to persistence (conversation-scope persistence contexts and so on).
    Thanks and keep up the great work,
    Thank you :) Cheers.
  27. Tapestry anyone?[ Go to top ]

    Gavin, sometime ago, you mentioned the possibility of adding Tapestry support. What's the status of that? and is there a roadmap? Also, dont know if this sounds dumb, but is Seam suitable for JSF-POJO-Hibernate coding with Tomcat as web server?
  28. Re: What's New in Seam 1.1[ Go to top ]

    (0) Will SEAM support be available for WLS 8.x?
    The problem is that Seam requires JDK 5.0 in order for the annotations / generics to function correctly. WLS 8.x does not run on JDK 5.0 ... You guys should really move up to JDK 5.0! :) WLS 10.0 Preview is already out!
    (2) Any plans for a book similar to the Hiby books?
    As Gavin said, I have a short book on Seam current in Safari RoughCut (the paperback will come out in Q1 2007, I am finalizing the draft as we speak). cheers Michael
  29. Integration of Seam and JSF GUI ?[ Go to top ]

    Hi A short question : is it possible to use tools (like Netbeans) to build the JSF pages for Seam ? If so, it really rocks all the way long ! If not, it's planned to let it possible sometime ? Thanks in advance, ZedroS
  30. By the way, the new Netbeans 5.5 JSF WYSIWYG editor ties you to com.sun.* components.
  31. By the way, the new Netbeans 5.5 JSF WYSIWYG editor ties you to com.sun.* components.
    I'm not 100% sure of this, but I think if you use the "standard" components instead of the ones Sun created for JSC/VWP, then I don't think you end up bound to the Sun components. However, much of the automation because the WYSIWYG editor would be lost.
  32. By the way, the new Netbeans 5.5 JSF WYSIWYG editor ties you to com.sun.* components.


    I'm not 100% sure of this, but I think if you use the "standard" components instead of the ones Sun created for JSC/VWP, then I don't think you end up bound to the Sun components. However, much of the automation because the WYSIWYG editor would be lost.
    I meant "beyond" the WYSIWYG editor...
  33. exadel studio[ Go to top ]

    I think Exadel studio works pretty well.
  34. Hi

    A short question : is it possible to use tools (like Netbeans) to build the JSF pages for Seam ?
    Right now, we have some basic NetBeans support for the projects generated from SeamGen (build / deploy / redeploy / debug). The NetBeans Facelets plugin (soon to be released snapshot 04) will help you with code completion / syntax highlighting on the Facelets pages. But unfortunately, Seam does not work with the NetBeans VWP GUI editor out of the box right now. What you can do is to visually build your UI pages with the GUI editor and then use the refractor tool to change the backing bean binding to you Seam components. This would at least allow you to take advantage of the visual UI construction part ... There is a java.net project to develop NetBeans modules for Seam. It does not have anything yet. But if you are interested, you are welcome to contribute. :)
  35. Thanks for your answers. In fact, up to now, I'm quite of the complexity of using Seam (as I'm not used to JSF). As such, I tought tools like Netbeans VWP could ease my concerns about JSF on Seam, but, after reading your link, not by much. I find it quite odd that JSF, having been promoted as the "best way to have cross suppliers visual development of Web components" doesn't allow a visual web tool to integrate JSF components of various sources. (I hope I'm clear enough to be understanble, if not just tell me so ;)). At the end of the day, having JSF but no real way to integrate JSF components from different sources in the same tool is quite upsetting I find. The .Net/visual Studio killer still isn’t there I fear ! Whatever, thanks again for your answer. Cheers ZedroS
  36. At the end of the day, having JSF but no real way to integrate JSF components from different sources in the same tool is quite upsetting I find. The .Net/visual Studio killer still isn’t there I fear !
    Agreed. In fact, the NetBeans VWP was just recently released. But as someone else has pointed out, there are commercial Eclipse plugins that does visual editing for JSF / Ajax / Seam pretty well (I mean, VS is by no means free ether :)). But on the other hand, Seam choose JSF not because of its promise in visual tools, but because of its component-based architecture and its use of ELs.
  37. Re: Integration of Seam and JSF GUI ?[ Go to top ]

    But on the other hand, Seam choose JSF not because of its promise in visual tools, but because of its component-based architecture and its use of ELs.
    Right. While I would certainly love to see a great opensource visual editor for JSF, I'm not sure I would get that much use out of it myself, because I'm generally trying to produce nice semantic HTML templates, and add the look and layout later with CSS. The visual editor actually makes this harder, IMO. I've been working with JSF for a while now, and really didn't miss a visual editor yet, but, of course, YMMV.
  38. I should maybe spend some time digging deeper in JSF, but up to now it seemed a rather complex technology with quite a lot of overhead for "simple uses". As such, I would welcome a visual editor. It would kind of leverage the complexity I see in JSF, or at least scare me less ;) Furthermore, I feel like it would deeply democratize the use of such tools as Seam. And it would be a good thing for all the parties involved I guess. Hopefully someone from the Netbeans team will see this topic and start to open VWT to JSF components others than Sun's ones. ZedroS... daydreamers may be the makers of tomorrow's reality ;)
  39. I should maybe spend some time digging deeper in JSF, but up to now it seemed a rather complex technology with quite a lot of overhead for "simple uses".
    Try out this tutorial: http://docs.jboss.com/seam/1.1GA/reference/en/html/gettingstarted.html And look at the generated code, and then tell me that the simple cases can't be simple ;-) OK, of course plain JSF (without Seam) would be less simple, but once you throw Seam in the mix you end up with something that is about as simple as you can possibly get (even compared to stuff like RoR).
    Furthermore, I feel like it would deeply democratize the use of such tools as Seam. And it would be a good thing for all the parties involved I guess.
    I'm not trying to disagree with you too much, just expressing my personal preference.
    Hopefully someone from the Netbeans team will see this topic and start to open VWT to JSF components others than Sun's ones.
    We've been yammering at the NetBeans folks to improve their Seam support for a while now. Another voice certainly doesn't hurt! ;-)
  40. Re: Integration of Seam and JSF GUI ?[ Go to top ]

    While I would certainly love to see a great opensource visual editor for JSF
    Visual Web Pack is going to be open sourced in next months (not sure about when exactly but it is going to happen).
    I'm not sure I would get that much use out of it myself, because I'm generally trying to produce nice semantic HTML templates, and add the look and layout later with CSS. The visual editor actually makes this harder, IMO.
    Right. Some people prefer the template-way and for them the visual editor is not the right approach. I wrote a blog entry which can help people decide if they should use a visual editor for JSF or not (in case of NetBeans if they should use the Visual Web Pack). For total beginners a Visual JSF editor might be really useful, especially if they want to build usual smaller database-driven applications. For complex applications the handcoding approach should be better. There are other factors as discussed in the blog entry.
  41. EJB3 nirvana[ Go to top ]

    With that title, I'll get the Spring groupies to fight back a little on what they would consider to be an oxymoron. But were it not for Seam, the dream of an inter-operable component marketplace may never materialize, and the JEE5 marketplace would be less than complete. There is a lot to be said for SOA, but without components, there is no real web services presence, unless you are satisfied without functionality and only in data transfer. The reality is that what we have been talking about for 7 years in the Enterprise Java world has come to fruition, and it is only a matter of time before the developers have control of the keys to IT. I spent a lot of time evangelizing the EJB component concept while at Sun, so you can take your pot-shots on me why the EJB concept was over-sold, but it is beyond recognizable that EJB is in fact under-delivered without Seam and EJB3. The past was predecessor, and the plan to make a marketplace of re-usable web services is possible, and will happen. Fighting against it is only one sure way to demonstrate that you believe in proprietary constructs, such as what some Java vendors prefer. I only look out for the development of best practice implementations, such as Seam, to dominate the application development methodology, while truly over-hyped concepts, get their day in the sun, at present. What my friend and former colleague, Peter Yared, described as the bain of EJB has become the strength of the industry. Like I (or Morpheus) said, it is only a matter of time, not if, but when, inter-operability breeds components swapping marketplaces...
  42. Non-HTML views[ Go to top ]

    I was at one point investigating using SEAM, but one drawback was that we're straying away from using HTML rendition, rather our views are based on in browser transformation of xml with an attached xslt. Most of our application services render xml, as our domain model is tightly integrated with an industry schema. This also dramatically increases performance, as you're no longer pushing html/css, which are magnitured larger than just pushing data and transforming it with a stylesheet which is cached on the client. Either way, Gavin mentioned that he was invisioning this type of support, but a few months ago it wasn't there yet. ANyone know if there are plans on supporting this? Ilya
  43. Road Map[ Go to top ]

    For those who are interested, I blogged the road map here: http://blog.hibernate.org/cgi-bin/blosxom.cgi/2006/12/14#roadmap
  44. Re: Road Map[ Go to top ]

    Great! The Spring integration piece will be really useful. It seems that the Security and iText features will be available in 1.1.5 instead of 1.2. When will 1.1.5 come out? Thanks.
  45. Re: Road Map[ Go to top ]

    For those who are interested, I blogged the road map here:

    http://blog.hibernate.org/cgi-bin/blosxom.cgi/2006/12/14#roadmap
    The possibility of iText/PDF generation is very interesting, and the integration with existing Spring-based DAOs is going to make Seam even more attractive (especially to me!). Impressive.
  46. Awesome[ Go to top ]

    For those who are interested, I blogged the road map here:

    http://blog.hibernate.org/cgi-bin/blosxom.cgi/2006/12/14#roadmap
    Spring integration! I hope that by the time the new version is released my projects with spring will be finished and I'd be able to start fresh with Seam. Anyway, is good to know about the integration.
  47. Re: Awesome[ Go to top ]

    Integration with Spring would be an absolute crucial feature for me to think seriously about Seam. I really hope Seam developers will concentrate their efforts on this issue to create a nice and high-quality solution as soon as possible.
  48. Re: What's New in Seam 1.1[ Go to top ]

    Seam is quite interesting. We have built jBilling on JBoss and we still have to migrate to jBoss 4 (web services are on the way). The thing is, for every migration there have to be concrete gains. My point is, does it make sense to migrate a Struts/JSP application to Seam? Even for a product already using JBoss, this might be a tough sell. Paul C Sr Developer jBilling - The Open Source Enterprise Billing System
  49. Re: What's New in Seam 1.1[ Go to top ]

    My point is, does it make sense to migrate a Struts/JSP application to Seam? Even for a product already using JBoss, this might be a tough sell.

    Paul C
    Sr Developer
    Yes, there are quite a few compelling reasons to migrate existing apps from older stacks to Seam. Just a few from the top of my head: * Seam makes it *very easy* to add AJAX and other rich UI widgets without breaking your existing business logic * Out of the box, Seam supports multiple workspaces (must-have for modern tab-enabled browsers :)) and the BACK button etc. * Seam streamlines your overall architecture and reduces the redundant code you have in your app (DTOs, various facades, XML code etc.) * Seam reduces your HTTP session size and eliminate memory leaks you might not even know you have * Seam make it easy to lazy load the DB or perform atomic transactional web conversations, and hence improve the app performance if you are not already doing those by hand. There must be more I missed. But you got the idea. :) Michael ---------- Book on JBoss Seam
  50. Seam and portlets ?[ Go to top ]

    Just a side question (as I currently work on a portal) : does seam support portlet as well ? Is it planned sometime in the future ? Thanks again ! ZedroS
  51. Re: Seam and portlets ?[ Go to top ]

    Just a side question (as I currently work on a portal) : does seam support portlet as well ?
    Yes, a number of our users are developing portal apps using Seam; it works, however, it is an area where we still need some improvements and extra functionality.
  52. Re: Seam and portlets ?[ Go to top ]

    Thanks again for your answer. I definitely have to digg into it !
  53. Re: What's New in Seam 1.1[ Go to top ]

    Thanks Michael. Those are good reasons. As I said, I find Seam very interesting and we will keep following it closely at jBilling. We already have a migration road map to JBoss 4 - EJB3. Seam could make it for later next year. Keep up the good work. Paul C. Sr Developer jBilling The Open Source Enterprise Billing System
  54. Multi database single application[ Go to top ]

    From what Gavin and others write this seems to me to be the one and only thing to develop modern Ajax based applications working against a database. Are there any competitors at all? We do however need to develop one application but we have many databases (with exactly the same tables in all databases) where it's necessary for the end user to be able to select what database to work against. Some kind of list to select the database from is required. In some cases permanently displayed to the user. There may be 20, 50 or many more databases. We are starting to study all this now, but does anyone know if such a solution would be reasonably simple to develop using Seam? Nils
  55. Re: Multi database single application[ Go to top ]

    We do however need to develop one application but we have many databases (with exactly the same tables in all databases) where it's necessary for the end user to be able to select what database to work against.
    Actually it should be super-easy. All you need to do is stick the reference to the persistence unit you are interested in into the Seam session context. The only downside is you will need 20 (!) persistence.xml files. Another approach is to write a custom Hibernate ConnectionProvider, which pulls the JDBC URL from the session context. Then you only need one persistence.xml file. Anyway, its totally doable, we can discuss this further in the forum.
  56. Seam case study[ Go to top ]

    In case you have missed it, here is a case study of a "real life" application built with JBoss Seam: http://www.slideshare.net/sfermigier/nuxeo-ep-5-open-source-enterprise-content-management-a-seam-case-study/1 (On Slideshare) http://blogs.nuxeo.com/sections/blogs/eric_barroca/2006_11_23_nuxeo-s-presentation-jboss-world-berlin-2006 (same, as PDF)
  57. Re: Seam case study[ Go to top ]

    Stefane (and anyone else), If you want to share your Seam story as part of the JSF Central "In the Trenches" series, please drop us a line at trenches (at) jsfcentral (dot) com. We will be reviving the series next year with some interesting stories, and we'd love to see some stories on Seam. Kito D. Mann - Author, JavaServer Faces in Action http://www.JSFCentral.com - JavaServer Faces FAQ, news, and info * Sign up for the JSF Central newsletter! http://oi.vresp.com/?fid=ac048d0e17 *