Oracle JDeveloper 11g preview available

Discussions

News: Oracle JDeveloper 11g preview available

  1. Oracle JDeveloper 11g preview available (18 messages)

    Oracle has made the JDeveloper 11g preview available for download. This update brings many updates, including updated JUnit 4 support, a new profiler that leverages the JVM's hooks, better database support, extra web services support, editor support for JavaScript, better performance, and more. Most of the big (i.e., popular) IDEs now deploy to multiple servers, while Oracle JDeveloper 11 largely caters to Oracle's own application server. It's certainly possible to deploy the output to any compliant application server, but do you see the targeting to Oracle iAS as a problem?
  2. Non IAS platforms[ Go to top ]

    JDeveloper offers many features that are oracle specific, but these features don't conflict or override standard IDE features. What does an ide need to do to be usable with pretty much every application server? The answer for me is pretty is: - Provide coding features (code completion, refactoring, etc.) - Compile Java code - Integrated CVS & SVN - Be able to run ANT targets - (Provide a wizard here or there for building standard J2EE components or services). I think Netbeans, Eclipse, and JDeveloper all do the job just fine for me. I'm sure IDEA does too, but I have never personally used it. I don't think the features Netbeans has for Glassfish make it less usable for other application servers, just as I don't think that the features Oracle has for OC4J make it less usable other application servers. My only personal rip on JDeveloper is that their JSP compiler is always behind the times, or is overly restrictive in the what it allows you to do in the JSP. Most people are sloppy JSP coders, so in order to compile other peoples applications in JDeveloper you sometimes have to spend a lot of time fixing their JSPs. Most of the time I would just prefer that JDeveloper just ignore the problems. I have not tried JDeveloper 11 so maybe this is not much of an issue anymore.
  3. Advantaes of JDeveloper[ Go to top ]

    JDeveloper has some distinct advantages over other IDEs. The GUI developer for Swing never marks code as uneditable. You can change either the code or the graphical objects, and the other changes to suit. And it actually checks your JSPs, not just for syntax, but to be sure any referenced object classes actually exist. Both of these features make the developer more productive.
  4. Re: Non IAS platforms[ Go to top ]

    I'm sure IDEA does too, but I have never personally used it. actually from the first letter i knew that u never tested idea,if u did ,u throw JDeveloper from the window sorry jdeveloper team,but u have a very crowded ,unorganised gui which make life as hell ,i spend half of my dev time just to navigate between different pieces
  5. Re: Non IAS platforms[ Go to top ]

    sorry jdeveloper team,but u have a very crowded ,unorganised gui which make life as hell ,i spend half of my dev time just to navigate between different pieces
    I take it you have never used Eclipse then....
  6. Not just for Oracle[ Go to top ]

    It's certainly possible to deploy the output to any compliant application server, but do you see the targeting to Oracle iAS as a problem?
    Actually from the survey that is currently running on the JDeveloper discussion forum it seems that more than 30% of the users use JDeveloper for non-Oracle application server development.
  7. One thing that many of TSS users would probably find to be exciting in this release is the new set of ADF Faces rich client JSF components - there are over 100 Ajax enabled JSF components there. More info is here: http://www.oracle.com/technology/products/adf/adffaces/index.html
  8. Yes, I'm definitely excited about the new components. Any chance that they might be available as a stand alone download any time soon?
  9. Although the news item just covers availability of JDeveloper 11g Preview, Oracle has released OC4J 11g Technology Preview that is fully Java EE 5 compliant. You can download it from http://www.oracle.com/technology/tech/java/oc4j/index.html regards Debu Panda Oracle Inside Scoop on enterprise Java Author EJB 3 In Action
  10. Looking good[ Go to top ]

    JDeveloper is looking better and better! The support for building service oriented applications may not be the typical java IDE-use case, but the way JDev lets you build a composite with ESB, BPEL and Rules-support from a single tool is great. Presumably, though, the ADF framework is more important for most people. ADF Faces is a first-class JSF framework, with lots and lots of good components. If you are one of those people who like to start with a relational database model (rather than an object model), ADF BC (Business Components) provide unsurpassed support for that! Eirik
  11. Re: Looking good[ Go to top ]

    If you are one of those people who like to start with a relational database model (rather than an object model), ADF BC (Business Components) provide unsurpassed support for that!

    Eirik
    I hope it's some kind of astrosurfing and that you aren't a real user. Hibernate is unbeatable at this if you use Hibernate tools, ADF BC being the worst framework I ever used personally. Here a couples of points :
    • It generates tons of unreadable java/xml sources codes, forcing you in the process to rely on JDev wizards which more than often are bugged. I can't count the number of times I had to recreate a stupid entity or view just because something was not working properly and I couldn't figure out what was it. And try to edit your code outside of Jdev.
    • Also, I don't know about you but I'm not really found (and I don't know a lot of developer who are) of putting new code in generated java files. I'm always afraid the wizard is going to delete everything next time I change something (it has happened to me). Therefore you always ends up with an anemic model, all the business code being handled by massive "service" class.
    • The framework is so invasive that's not even funny (No Pojos). For instance, your service have to implements an ApplicationModule interface (why does an O/R framework cares about your service objects anyway), ...
    • There is a totally unnecessary layer of objects (view objects, why entities aren't sufficient?) supposed to support some advancing mapping options but I have never seen it used (Oracle doesn't give any advice in its documentation). Most of the time the view layer is the same as the entity layer.
    • The O/R mapping options are very limited and often just don't work (view inheritance was quite hard to achieve).
    • It's painfully slow.
    • ...
    I'm just glad we dumped it for Hibernate. I have never looked back. If we we're still using ADF, I would have switched to TopLink/JPA which is at list a true O/R framework.
  12. Re: Looking good[ Go to top ]

    Didn't realise there are so many goodies from Oracle.
  13. I used jdeveloper 10.1.3 and It was not so good. Java code editing features were not so advanced as Eclipse's are, more over the JPA feature works well with TopLink, but there is no plugin for Hibernate. From the perspective of the usability, I think NetBeans is one of the best choices, even better than Eclipse (I'm and Eclipse user). For usability, I prefer NetBeans, for performance and "cool" features, I prefer Eclipse. JDeveloper is the "must" if you work with Oracle components, as BPEL. I've never used IntelliJ IDEA because of its not free licence. Bye.
  14. Hi, We have been using it to deploy our apps to Oracle IAS and other AS. It worked pretty well so far on development and deployment. I owe many thanks to guys at Oracle.
  15. My general beef with Jdeveloper is that whatever you develop .. especially ADF stuff - is dependant on the IDE. If I wanted to move that stuff out of Jdeveloper then I would be pretty much be screwed. Is this still the case with Jdev 11 ? I remember having to right click all over the place to do databindings for controls (it created alot xml files). Is there a way to do manual databinding now?
  16. ADF, what a name[ Go to top ]

    Is there anyone in Oracle who is able to come up with a better name than "ADF"? A name which may have a vowel and a little bit more meaningful.
  17. Thank you very much for this long awaited preview Just two questions for the Oracle team 1) When the release of JDeveloper 11 and OC4J (and the whole OAS stack) is planned? 2) Can these ADF Rich Components be localized? (For example, I need to customize date picker control to use Russian names for week days, or SelectManyShuttle with Russian words for "Move", "Move all" etc) At the moment we are choosing the JSF component set for our project and these two questions are the only obstacles for us not to choose ADF Faces Best regards, Ivan
  18. I am not oracle so I cannot answer the first, while I love this preview, there are certain aspects you need to be aware of, namely it only supports IE7 and it requires JSF 1.2, JSP 2.1 and there are to many containers supporting that. If you plan on going completely oracle then no issue.
    Choosing the JSF component set will lead you to failure, you need some component set that will get you moving along. I would suggest coding to Trinidad which is available now and looks to be compatible now with Oracle Rich Client. Rich Client has stuff beyond Trinidad but that using Trinidad will get you farther down the road.
  19. I have spent the last monts working with JDeveloper 11g development stack: ADF Rich Faces + ADF BC. I am writing Java for more than 6 years, but this was the most frustrating period of my (developer) life. JDeveloper IDE is reasonable, but no match for Eclipse or IntelliJ. ADF is by far the worst written framework I have work with, full of bugs, incredibly poor exception handling (full of NUP's on their own code). ADF Data binding is just huge duplication of xml ... What is also incredible is that they never state loud and clear what part of their features are already implemented and stable... Technical Oracle guys are all business.