No Fluff Just Stuff fees paid by your boss - why?

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News: No Fluff Just Stuff fees paid by your boss - why?

  1. The No Fluff Just Stuff conference touts "Come learn from industry experts and from each other, see real world case studies, and delve into hands-on code examples. No marketing fluff will be found here. Find an upcoming symposium near you and find out more about sessions, keynote addresses, networking opportunities, and lots more stuff..." but they don't readily tell you about the $800 price tag. The conference is coming to my area in a few weeks. The early bird sign up to save some money is about to end. Can anyone help us developers create a list of reasons why our bosses should font the cost of the entry ticket? [Editor's note: sure, NFJS is sort of a competitor to TSS' own conferences, but let's be real: this is a community site, and NFJS is a good conference. Plus, any reasons offered here will apply to TSSJS, too...]

    Threaded Messages (24)

  2. why our bosses should font the cost of the entry ticket?
    font is a noun not a verb.
  3. typo?[ Go to top ]

    why our bosses should font the cost of the entry ticket?

    font is a noun not a verb.
    i read that as "front", which i imagine was the actual meaning of the poster.
  4. You pay...[ Go to top ]

    I would pay the $800 if NFJS is a local event. Save your boss convincing for the bigger tech shows that you want to travel to. NFJS costs you a weekend too, but I think it is well worth it, if you choose sessions wisely and put some effort into meeting other local developers. It's the larger events that involve travel and lodging that you can save up the arguments for. There are more compelling biz reasons you can think of for them; technology vendors, competitors, customers, etc. NFJS is just for you and your career. NFJS Tangle
  5. Frankly, NFJS isn't like other conferences. $800 is a fraction of what other conferences charge, and you only pay $625 is you register early (less if a group of people from your company go together). Plus, you don't have to pay for travel. When they say "no fluff," they mean it. They have some of the best speakers in the industry (I've spoken for them myself ;)). Stu Halloway, Dave Thomas, Ted Neward, et al. The sessions are 90 minutes. That extra 30 minutes can be kind of long, but it enables you to get some real meat and actually learn something (hence "stuff"). You will *not* be subjected to "advertisement" talks. At almost every other conference I've been to, vendors pay for talks, keynotes, and panels (the vendors actually choose the panelists in some cases), and the conference hosts don't even tell the paying attendees which talks are which. Here's the best selling point for your boss: it's on a weekend so you don't have to miss much work. ;)
  6. It is a good idea as I struggled (and ultimately failed in enough time) to justify going to TSS' conference. I suggested: - networking with peers - open forum for new ideas - the opportunity to put your company's name around - the opportunity to see if your products are applicable in other industry verticals (via the networking) - a chance to shine I won them over eventually, but it was too late by then. I also got my CEO to commit to giving a bonus if anyone managed to give a presentation at these conferences. =)
  7. I'm sure NFJS is a great conference, but if you are in Europe then another great option is JavaPolis - a fraction of the cost of NFJS for an excellent 5 day conference. I've not had a problem getting my boss to pay for that...
  8. Also...[ Go to top ]

    From my experience, employers are most often actually worried about someone stealing you. You might point out that there won't be any vendors there at all, let alone any collecting resumes. ;)
  9. Re: Also...[ Go to top ]

    Hey Bob, talking about stealing... Will you be collecting resumes at the next TSSSJ or NFJS confs ? :-) LOL Bela
  10. Re: Also...[ Go to top ]

    Will you be collecting resumes at the next TSSSJ or NFJS confs?
    Why, are you interested? ;)
  11. Re: Also...[ Go to top ]

    Will you be collecting resumes at the next TSSSJ or NFJS confs?


    Why, are you interested? ;)
    Yeah, I'd hire you ;-) Peace, Cameron Purdy Oracle Coherence: The Java Data Grid
  12. Can anyone help us developers create a list of reasons why our bosses should font the cost of the entry ticket?
    I meant 'front' thanks for your contribution Raul Garcia.
    Editor's note: sure, NFJS is sort of a competitor to TSS' own conferences, but let's be real: this is a community site, and NFJS is a good conference. Plus, any reasons offered here will apply to TSSJS, too...
    Thanks for remaining objective and supportive, Editor. Good list so far. Many things that I had not thought of that are probably important to management, such as no one taking resumes, and the ability to compare our progress with other's progress in the realm.
  13. Time commitment[ Go to top ]

    I realize each company has a different priority on time versus money. But one aspect that draws me to NFJS is the time commitment. In the shows I've gone to, the sessions start at noon on Friday and go through Sunday. Therefore it's not a time burden on the company beyond the half day. It also shows that the developer is willing to spend personal time on the weekend to improve their skill set. This combined with the relatively low cost and the high quality make NFJS a wise investment in my opinion. I've never gone to TSSJS but I know people who have and enjoyed it very much. David
  14. Targeted Training[ Go to top ]

    1. Business Development - Spread the word about what your team/company does. Exchange contact information and participate in informal meetings with the hopes of finding business opportunities. 2. Discover Best Practices - Talk with others working with the same or similar technologies as you. What works best? What doesn't work? Save your team/company from finding something out the hard way. 3. Targeted Training - It's normal for companies to reject classroom style training. It can be hard for a training session to effectively educate a group of people all at different levels in their careers and experience. A conference like this gives a person the chance to attend 'training' sessions that will benefit himself/herself the most. 4. The upcoming NFJS conference is over the weekend. It will barely be cutting into your billable hours :)
  15. Re: Targeted Training[ Go to top ]

    It will barely be cutting into your billable hours :)
    Maybe not yours. :)
  16. because...[ Go to top ]

    You'll only miss a half day of work, and you'll definitely learn something that will help you do your job better on the following Monday. I bet you can look through the agenda and find something that pertains to what you're doing on a daily basis. btw, I've been 4 times, couldn't go this year, but heard it was the best yet (Cincinnati)
  17. Ditto[ Go to top ]

    I can't say anything that others haven't already covered. I've gone twice and found the content to be first rate and as they said, there are no vendors (no SWAG, either). Most of the speakers are great and I had absolutely no problem talking to them about specific challenges which they helped us greatly with. Finally, this is a cheap morale booster to inspire your employees to take their jobs more seriously and feel more important. It inspired all of our developers to try a little harder, do more research, etc. It's great for treating mediocrity. Our company easily gets its money back.
  18. Was Worth It[ Go to top ]

    First of all, the critical reason for attending NoFluff is that nobody is trying to sell anything. Because of that, they can be candid and tell you what works. Surely, the presenters have books they'd love to sell, but the whole point of it is that it's info without an agenda. I went three years in a row at Salt Lake City. It was interesting in that it gave us several new ideas on how to do stuff. Those new ideas ended up saving us money and causing us to get out in front of the big SOA boom. Also--don't tell your boss this--the chow was pretty good too.
  19. I have been going to the NFJS for about 5 years. For the price they charge it is one of the best conferences around. The conference is very inexpensive and the speakers and material are excellent. I get exposed to a lot of new ideas and technologies and do not have to sit through vendor advertising. Every co-worker I have taken to a NFJS conference has come out of the experience going this is one of the "best conferences" they ever went to. One of the reasons I think the conference is so valuable is because the people who attend are there because they are willing to give up a weekend to invest in themselves. I can not tell you how irritating it is to go a "large" conference in a city with a bunch of co-workers who think the only reason to go is for a vacation. NFJS conferences are not like that. You leave the conference feeling drained because you have had so much new information thrown at you. If you have not gone to one I highly recommend you try it out. I think you will be pleased. - John Disclosure: I used to be a speaker at the NFJS in the early days of the conference tour. Even though I do not speak anymore, I make it a point to attend the conference every year it comes to my hometown. I have told my boss that if I can only go to one conference per year, I would rather go to a NFJS in Milwaukee, WI then an IBM Rational Conference in Orlando, Florida.
  20. I would rather go to a NFJS in Milwaukee, WI then an IBM Rational Conference in Orlando, Florida.
    Well, I'm going to NJFS in Orlando, Florida... day after tomorrow, in fact... but then again, I live there... ;-) I just wanted to add that, if you have a local Java users' group, the members will often get a discount. And after your first time there, you'll get an alumni discount for future conferences. There are also early-bird and group discounts... so most people can usually get in for less than $800. Although 800 bucks is a bargain compared to most conferences... And I will have to add my "amen" to all those who've pointed out what a great conference it is.
  21. nfjs User Group support[ Go to top ]

    side comment on what NFJS does for the Java community: I was president of the Oklahoma City Java Users Group (okcjug.org) when NFJS came to town. Jay Zimmerman was nice enough to sponsor a meeting and have Scott Davis come speak to our group about Groovy and Grails a month before the symposium (it's on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqHwwAWXcbE). The symposium was great and there was some swag - a laptop backpack, travel cup, and a leather binder - all with the NFJS logo.
  22. Just went[ Go to top ]

    I attended NFJS in Cincinnati last weekend. The lack of travel costs definitely eased the approval process for me. The weekend schedule meant that my boss wasn't missing me for 3 or 4 days. The overall cost of the conference was right in the ballpark too. Overall, I think it was about the easiest a conference could be to justify. If you end up going, I really enjoyed the presentations by Jared Richardson and Venkat Submaraniam.
  23. Will work/dance for "No Fluff Just Stuff" conference fees.
  24. Thanks for the reminder guys. I took some ideas posted on here and went to talk to my boss and he gladly fronted the cost for this conference. :-) See you guys at the Dallas No Fluff Just Stuff Conference!
  25. Wish I could give you a good suggestion. I gave countless reasons to my company of the value of what's covered in NFJS vs the cost. I told them that you can send 4 developers for the cost of sending ONE dev to JavaOne. As soon as my employer heard 800 bucks (650 on my alumni discount) the senior mgmt said; "No way in hell - sorry."