Microsoft vs. Sun Microsystems: Aftershocks May Follow

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News: Microsoft vs. Sun Microsystems: Aftershocks May Follow

  1. The GIGA group has published an interesting analysis regarding the effects of the recent settlement between Sun and Microsoft. The article states, "The ultimate effect of the recent settlement between Microsoft and Sun Microsystems over the future of Java depends on how many development shops are committed to the J2EE platform vs. using Java simply as a language."

    Read Article Here.

    Article Abstract
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    The ultimate effect of the recent settlement between Microsoft and Sun Microsystems over the future of Java depends on how many development shops are committed to the J2EE platform vs. using Java simply as a language. The settlement does not change the technical dynamics of the platform battle between J2EE and Microsoft.NET. Since Sun opened its Java lawsuit against Microsoft in October 1997, no one has expected to see Java-compatible products from Microsoft. Using non-Microsoft Java virtual machines, J2EE has grown dramatically without Microsoft Java compatibility, blossoming into a $1.6 billion application server market — plus associated development tools and application software. Those who use Java as a language on Microsoft platforms (without J2EE) will have to carefully consider future options. Not to be underestimated, fear of Microsoft backlash against Java may affect the decision processes of both those who favor the J2EE platform and those who use Java as a language.
  2. This thread : http://theserverside.com/discussion/thread.jsp?thread_id=4306 might also be of interest in the -

    J2EE vs M$ .NET debate...
  3. It seems to me this article makes too much of the battle between Sun and Microsoft with relation to J2EE and .Net. The battle for the Internet operation system or Internet platform is more between the J2EE licenses and Microsoft. Companies like BEA, IBM, Oracle, etc. are forwarding J2EE and providing a great platform for Internet based applications.
  4. Shame on GIGA ... This article is really ignorant of the number of J2EE products and real-world implementations that are out there. It's also ignorant of the fact that IONA has already announced .Net Support for Java against Microsoft's Common Language Runtime. As an example, BEA WebLogic or Sybase EAS on Win2000 against SQL Server 2000 are both very viable J2EE enterprise implementations.
  5. Clarification ... there are a lot of J2EE implementations on MS NT and 2000 server platforms.
  6. The real issue is whether Microsoft can leverage the desktop market to gain a competitive edge in the internet space. In my mind, this differs significantly because, compared to other applications that Microsoft has pursued this strategry with, internet applications are dependent on reasonably dumb clients and smart servers. Microsoft controls the clients, but not the servers.
  7. Where and when was this announcement from IONA made? I'd be very interested in finding more about it.

    Regards, Bill.