Editorial: Out of Touch

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News: Editorial: Out of Touch

  1. Editorial: Out of Touch (35 messages)

    TSS doesn't normally publish editorials, but since lately we've been trying to be more transparent about how we do things... One of the hardest things about a site like TSS is how difficult it is for me - Your Humble Editor - to get good feedback. At JavaOne, TSS had a booth on the pavilion floor, and I'm pleased to say that we had a constant stream of visitors, and I was pleased to meet every one of you who dropped by while I was at the booth. If you weren't there when I was... one of the things I tried to ask everyone was "what can we improve?" I didn't ask things like "what do we do well?" or "can you praise us?" because if we're doing well, we don't need to change it. We - well, I - need data on what I screw up, so I can fix it, if it's fixable. Some things are tough to address in timely fashion. For example, the main complaint about TSS that I heard was the platform itself. (I've heard other complaints, too, which I'll address later on -- this is about the complaints I received in person.) The platform is dated, very 2002. Sites like JavaLobby and InfoQ have more modern, more cool interfaces and architectures. TSS is stodgy by comparison, and programmers aren't typically happy being stodgy. We know all this. What's more, it's being addressed. Your Humble Editor bangs this particular drum so often that it's no longer effective for me to do so; the powers-that-be are starting to ignore me about it. As usual, there's more here than meets the eye. That said, it's being addressed. Really. We talk with platform vendors, we talk with each other about open sourcing the platform (or most of it, at least)... we talk about it quite a bit. The platform update for TSS is important. It's not so important, though, as the content. The platform can be the k3wle5t thing on the intarw3b EVAR (OMG LOL) but if the content isn't worth reading, the platform doesn't matter. This is where things get difficult. Through various channels, I hear that the content isn't satisfying: that it's Your Humble Editor's blog, or that it's out of touch with what's going on in the development community, or that it's unethical or irresponsible somehow. The idea that people feel these things don't bother me much - it's all data. Once I know it's out there, I can try to address it. It's when I don't know what people think that I can do nothing about it. You may have noticed that TSS changes tone every so often. That's deliberate. I write with a very dry tone, typically; I think I've used "I" more in this post than I have in the past three years on TSS, for example, and I try very hard to keep my emotions or opinions out of TSS. I used to regularly ask people what they think I think about various subjects, and if they told me with any detail based on the posting, I knew I'd put too much of myself in the post. However, I try to vary how much opinion I let dribble out, because it can be valuable to some. I have perspective some others don't, and while I'm not the sharpest brick in the woodshed, I've been around and sometimes people need to see things they might not otherwise see. Does that make TSS my blog? Golly, I hope not - I've got a lot more to say than I put on TSS, and on more topics than I consider appropriate for TSS, too. I vary the tone to keep TSS fresh for readers, and to keep myself on my toes. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. A lack of ethics or responsibility is more serious. It's a charge I've had made before, back to when I started at JDJ many moons ago. (Thanks, Andy.) In most cases, I understand the reasons behind the charge, while disagreeing with them (with a few exceptions.) Naturally, JBoss is at the heart of most of it - the charges and the exceptions. Probably the hardest episode I've ever had at JDJ or TSS was during the Java in Action conference a few years ago, right before JBoss World Europe. Some bloggers wrote a very negative post on their own site about JBoss, and those bloggers had relevance to the JBoss community. They asked me to post an announcement about it, and I did. I've no problem with having posted it, but JBoss rightly said that I should have given them a chance to respond to it, for the post itself. I didn't, of course, and I should have. What can I say? They said it showed a lack of journalistic integrity on my part, and my only real responses to that are "mea culpa" (I am guilty) and... I'm not a journalist. Weak responses, both. The biggest issue, to me, is the statement that TSS is out of touch with the development community. Sadly, this comes up every now and then, and it's very frustrating, because I always get it second- or third-hand, it seems. I can't ask what we're out of touch with, because the person saying it isn't around. Tell us why we're out of touch. Please. I am always looking for the things that are happening now, where things are... and, sadly, things that are the "it projects" are so public, that there's not a lot of news there. Telling everyone what they already know is wasted effort. If you want me to do that anyway... well, tell me so. It's an old problem: people want TSS to get their message out, while understanding the message through osmosis or something. Basically, if you have something you think should be said, stand up and say it. As I've said before, I prefer content from other sources to my own. If you're in touch and I'm not, well... you're the right one to talk about it, not me. I learn from you, and vice versa, hopefully. Thank you for reading all this, by the way, if you've managed. My hope is that you'll take the time to tell me what you think, positive (if you have to) or negative (smoke 'em if you got 'em!), either here or through email my email address is jottinger at techtarget dot com . My goal is to make and keep TSS the best enterprise Java site on the internet, and as it's a community site, I need your help. Thanks for reading!

    Threaded Messages (35)

  2. Re: Editorial: Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    I've been reading TheServerSide forever. I've checked it almost daily for probably 7-8 years now. For a long time the content was awesome. We were getting the latest updates on the latest technologies, JSRs, etc. A few years later we found out that EJB 1.0 wasn't the hottest thing ever, and a few years after that we found out EJB 2.0 wasn't ideal, either. There's just not that much coming out that's super-exciting like it used to be. That's not the fault of TSS. That's more a function of the fact that we're not in the dotcom world anymore. All the "fancy new stuff" is AJAX or Rails/Django, and TSS doesn't really address that. Should it? Not really. It's for enterprise Java. A lot of the content here lately seems to be advertisements for a company's latest product. There's nothing wrong with that. But now that server-side Java has matured for the most part, it's not as exciting. And in some ways, that's good. Good software is simple and boring. That's something I didn't understand when I first started reading TSS so long ago. I think dzone and infoq come across as "fresher" content-wise, but they don't just address enterprise Java. Maybe it's time to open it up a bit? I honestly don't know. Most of the stuff I've been reading on a daily basis has been python related, myself. We've started to use django for some of our front end stuff. That's where I've been getting my fix for exciting, new content lately.
  3. Out of context quoting[ Go to top ]

    My only beef is the fact that some articles get quoting way out of context. Sometimes after reading the actual article I feel the TTS post has been purposely misleading to stir up emotions and drum up drama. These posts usually result in flame wars. It is a side of TTS that I could live without.
  4. Re: Out of context quoting[ Go to top ]

    My only beef is the fact that some articles get quoting way out of context. Sometimes after reading the actual article I feel the TTS post has been purposely misleading to stir up emotions and drum up drama. These posts usually result in flame wars. It is a side of TTS that I could live without.
    Examples?
  5. Re: Out of context quoting[ Go to top ]

    My only beef is the fact that some articles get quoting way out of context. Sometimes after reading the actual article I feel the TTS post has been purposely misleading to stir up emotions and drum up drama. These posts usually result in flame wars. It is a side of TTS that I could live without.
    The reason I ask for examples is because I purposefully try to make sure the tone of posts is not geared to encourage flamewars. It'll happen, to be sure, but unlike what someone else mentioned in another thread, there are no "stir-ups" on TSS.
  6. Re: Out of context quoting[ Go to top ]

    I’m not sure I agree that so-called “stir-ups” are bad. What everyone is referring to as stir-ups is just a controversial topic with frank ideas thrown in… Want examples? Plenty… - Checked exceptions vs. unchecked - Cameron Purdy vs. Mark Fluery/Bill Burke rivalry and how it affects Java community - Seam vs. Spring - Eclipse vs. IDEA - Open-source touchiness to the criticism… who cares if it’s free and open source if it’s garbage anyways? - Terracotta vs. Coherence vs. GigaSpaces vs. GridGain - Ruby on Rails is for pussies :-) - etc, etc. Many of these topics have been over-discussed but they are fun (most of them anyways) and always trigger good discussions. They are not stir-ups, this is just something that people like to read about and many like to comment on. My 2 cents, Nikita Ivanov. GridGain - Grid Computing Made Simple
  7. Re: Out of context quoting[ Go to top ]

    - Checked exceptions vs. unchecked
    - Cameron Purdy vs. Mark Fluery/Bill Burke rivalry and how it affects Java community
    - Seam vs. Spring
    - Eclipse vs. IDEA
    - Open-source touchiness to the criticism… who cares if it’s free and open source if it’s garbage anyways?
    - Terracotta vs. Coherence vs. GigaSpaces vs. GridGain
    - Ruby on Rails is for pussies :-)
    - etc, etc.
    Come on, there aren't seriously people out there who still think Eclipse is better than IDEA are there? -John-
  8. More variety[ Go to top ]

    I'd like more variety in enterprise topics. Sometimes I feel like TheServerSide is your local bookstore, where half of the software books are rehashes of "Design Patterns". You know what, I read that the first time around and and I could do without yet another the example of the "state pattern" (as if my EE courses in college never taught me that one!). But sometimes there will be gems here, just like POSA was in the flock of pattern books that came after. I was collecting scaling articles until I found http://highscalability.com. I read "Essential Windows Workflow Foundations" to learn about how to design a workflow engine, not specifically one in C#. I enjoy reading articles on concurrency, real-world architectures, etc. I think you could expand the scope of the site to not just reference projects written in Java, but topics relevant to Java developers in enterprise environments. You're doing a fair job now. I plan on buying a book on LINQ sometime soon and Quaere may be fun to play with (thanks to your article). I think you could do a lot more, though, without losing your Java base.
  9. Killing the messenger syndrome[ Go to top ]

    I visit TSS few times per week since a couple of years now and find this source of information quite valuable. While I am not always in agreement with articles and opinions that are published. I however do make a difference between their authors and the editor who publish them whom, in most cases, are two different persons. As easy to understand as it may sound, I find that there are still lots of noise from people who are not able to understand that difference. Many (not all) posts that kill the messenger suffer from an evident lack of argumentation on the matter at hand. I don't pay much attention to these... As for being "out of touch", well, I don't think so. Of course not all articles are of interest to me but I can assure you that there is seldom a week gone by without me learning one thing or two in direct relation with my work (application architect). That is to me quite "in touch". Jacques Ledoux
  10. Out of Touch?[ Go to top ]

    Mastering EJB and Jakarta Struts Live. Out of touch? Never ;)
  11. Sharp practice[ Go to top ]

    One improvement I would like to see a little more cynicism towards towards company and open source projects. Companies want coverage and free advertising. Unless a post is interesting or informative it should be removed. The nice open source guys, are not that any more; the world has moved on they are sharp operators trying to build consultancy on the open source model. They are businessmen after free advertising. Yes track the players but unless there is something interesting in the posts your customers will walk away. cheers Robert
  12. Re: Sharp practice[ Go to top ]

    Robert wrote:
    One improvement I would like to see a little more cynicism towards towards company and open source projects. Companies want coverage and free advertising. Unless a post is interesting or informative it should be removed. The nice open source guys, are not that any more; the world has moved on they are sharp operators trying to build consultancy on the open source model. They are businessmen after free advertising.
    Yes track the players but unless there is something interesting in the posts your customers will walk away.
    There are two kinds of posts that we push forward on TheServerSide.com: pieces that we commission to industry domain experts, and pieces contributed by the community. The contributed pieces are submitted as "news items" and many companies or their PR agencies do submit press releases and expect us to publish them "as-is", without edits. Open-source projects also post notices of minor improvements to their wares that have otherwise little relevance. We, the editors at TSS, try to winnow the good pieces from the barrage of hyped submissions we get every day. When I find something interesting I try contacting the people behind it to get additional quotes, references, examples, etc. to increase the relevance of the post beyond the PR fluff. Joe published his recommendations for writing for TSS last week. We're hoping that readers will feel encouraged to submit relevant content for the site, and that PR agencies pay attention to it on the things that are relevant to our readers. We're working on balancing an edgier tone with good quality content, and always look forward to your feedback. Cheers, E Non-stop action. A vulnerable hero. A quest to save the world. It's the most exciting novel of the decade: The Tesla Testament ISBN: 1-4116-7317-4 - BISAC: FIC031000
  13. Re: Editorial: Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    For me the UI isn't much of an issue. I've checked TSS once or twice a day for the past several years, and the tone has gone from being a positive one to almost a cynical sounding board for anyone who can post. I'm not sure there is much you can do about this particular aspect, but it has definitely affected how often I read or how long I spend reading on the site. I (personally) have jokingly referred to the site as "The Bitterside" since it seems many posts start out fine, but then degrade into whining and moaning, or alot of posts seem to quickly fall off the radar due to lack of interest from readers. I can only recall a handful of thought provocing(sp) posts in the past year. Perhaps the good stuff is just being buried amongst the rabble.
  14. Tag the content better[ Go to top ]

    I think the TSS main page has three primary types of content: 1. Announcements (products, conferences, etc) 2. Editorials (usually links to blogs) 3. Technical Articles (some in TSS and some links) I think those should all be sections, and the TSS main page should have links to the ones that are popular or somehow deemed more important. Please note that the group should be based on content. Person can write a very good technical article in a blog, and a person can editorialize in something presented as a technical article. I think labeling everything as "news" makes people think somehow it is journalistic work when in reality very little of it is. But in general I appreciate TSS content. It's easy enough to ignore the noise.
  15. I read daily, but...[ Go to top ]

    I do think that too great a percentage of the posts are "new product X" announced. While it is good to know these things, and one has to learn about them somewhere, these posts don't show any insight or seem that relevant to me. Once in a while I learn of a new release I had not known about (yet), but for the most part if it is something I use, I know about the new release. If it is something I don't use, the new release is not that important to me. The content I *want* - and I feel like TSS had more of this back in the day - is the "inside story" on what actually works and what doesn't and real comparisons between different approaches. Ideally there could be civil discussions around "Here's how I tried to use technology/product X to solve problem Y, and how it really didn't work out very well because of Z." To which other people might post how they tried to resolve the same problems. (And in my fantasy world, this would happen without company employees pushing their own solutions!) Joseph, I think you do a pretty good job on this site, and I mean no offense to you with anything I say here. There are times when you post items that seem like "baiting" some zealous reaction, but I think this is less frequent than it used to be. The nature of your posts, though, can be a bit more "journalist" than "practitioner". Only the truth of hands-on experience can shine a light through the fog of claims being made by various groups and vendors, and that's not the voice I hear in your posts. In that sense I would like more "I" in the articles - "when *I* tried to code this, here's what went wrong." I feel that the community aspect of the site has weakened, which is unfortunate because I felt more of those people spent most of their day writing code, and that's the voice I liked to hear. I confess I spend more time managing than in the trenches, and the voices on TSS used to be a good path to keeping in touch with the hands-on problems Java developers were dealing with.
  16. Re: I read daily, but...[ Go to top ]

    Thanks! Good feedback, all. The burden of practitioner vs. "reporter" is tough to balance. The problem is that there's simply too much to know. I actually do use most of the things I put on TSS, believe it or not. However... with such a flood of projects to know something about, there's no way to actually get knee-deep into many of them. I know the major things pretty well, I think - I hope! I "get it." That said, there are a ton of things that I can only understand from a cursory standpoint. Consider JGAP, a genetic algorithm project for Java. Interesting stuff... but you know, I don't do much programming that relies on genetic algorithms. I have my typical problem domains, and for the rest.. I have to rely on the project maintainers and the user base. For me to pretend otherwise... ick. There's just too much out there for me to actually do a direct comparison between everything, and it wouldn't be fair in any case, because my biases wouldn't match your biases or needs. That's why I ask the community to chime in more, because that way you get all of our voices, not just my voice.
  17. Re: Editorial: Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    I really appreciate that you don't start your own threads and make it your own professional discussion forum. I've seen some pretty lame discussions start up (on other sites) only because the editor started them, and I'm thankful that you don't treat TSS this way. I appreciate the site design as well, as it's easy to read the headlines quickly and without much trouble or distraction. Having topic tags for articles would be helpful, such as "open source" "security", "ORM", "UI", etc. and a topic filter mechanism would be helpful so users can quickly find relevant content if they are only interested in particular areas. Thanks, Jim
  18. TSS beyond TSS[ Go to top ]

    Because of my other job, I'm always interested in discussions about integration between Java and non-Java systems, like it often happens in the real world. Joe and I disagree on this to some degree because he believes that the focus should be more Java-centric and that readers would feel alienated from the site if we highlight competing technologies. I believe that TheServerSide.com can evolve to cover all server-side technologies, regardless of source, and discuss when it makes sense to use them and in which context. This evolves from another belief: Java technologies are awesome, but they aren't always the answer in all cases. Understanding what works and what doesn't, and in which context, is an important part of being a technology professional. Coverage of all the options in products, services, technologies, etc. should be part of our mission. What do you guys think? Cheers, E Non-stop action. A vulnerable hero. A quest to save the world. It's the most exciting novel of the decade: The Tesla Testament ISBN: 1-4116-7317-4 - BISAC: FIC031000
  19. Some ideas on the editorial content[ Go to top ]

    Hi Joe: First off, don't be so hard on yourself. That should be the job of us readers! :-) Here are some ideas to make the editorial focus a little sharper: 1) Ask the product announcement posters to identify the trend, marketplace, technology or pattern that they are releasing a product into. For instance, the Open Source Business Library announcement this week was really about Master Data Management (MDM.) MDM means a lot to people with a database background. It could mean a lot to people with an object background (like TSS readers) but the posting didn't cover that at all. The next time I make a PushToTest announcement it should be lead off with "Improvements in Ajax Testing" as opposed to "PushToTest Releases TestMaker 5". 2) There is a lot happening in the Web 2, Ajax, SOA, Web service, and REST spaces now that could be the focus of TSS reporting. Some of the Ajaxian content should be republished on TSS. A lot of this movement is in alternatives to thick clients by using Web 2 patterns in the browser. TSS should be reporting in these moves as they compliment server-side and Java development. The work Joe is doing on DWR is excellent. 3) The infrastructure has to improve. InfoQ's user interface is Web 2 and beautiful. TechTarget needs to fork over some cash. Even the smallest hole-in-the-wall taco shop gets a makeover every 5 years. 4) TSS is a personality maker. Cameron Purdy is a TSS star that hit the jackpot. And where was he before TSS! :-) You need to cultivate more of them. 5) Pay raises and more vacation for TSS staffers. Joe, Nitin, need I say more? -Frank Cohen http://www.pushtotest.com
  20. I love TSS[ Go to top ]

    I love TSS. Its a great place to try out and fine tune your message. I like to post here because you *know* that somebody is going to come out and attack every single word you say. In fact, I'll even go as far as saying I miss people like Mike Spille and Rolf. I do hope that TSS continues to question the sacred cows of our community. Be controversial. Generate discussion. No, I don't want to see posts like JBoss: a modern day plague or posts tarnishing an individual's or company's reputation without rebuttal, but let's not be afraid to question the viability of anything. -- Bill Burke JBoss, a division of Red Hat http://bill.burkecentral.com
  21. Re: I love TSS[ Go to top ]

    I like to post here because you *know* that somebody is going to come out and attack every single word you say.
    It's only you they attack though Bill and that's because you're always wrong. You asked for it! :-) -John-
  22. It's really handy to know when a new product is released, but it's not really news as such. Why not add a new content category for product announcements and save the News tag for genuine industry news? I personally come to TSS looking for the latest news but also useful articles that tell me how to do stuff and books/chapters I can download and read. Geeks like to learn new stuff & we like to do it in a humorous environment with like-minded people. I agree you need more people like Cameron Purdy putting people (and they're magic beans) in their places.
  23. It's really handy to know when a new product is released, but it's not really news as such [...] I personally come to TSS looking for the latest news but also useful articles that tell me how to do stuff and books/chapters I can download and read...
    Same here. I come here to get a feel for what other professionals are doing. With most postings are announcements and aren't of interest to me. Also, IMHO if the announcement of a new product doesn't clearly present the reasons why the community should try it, then it shouldn't be here. This means that it should include either a clear problem statement, or either a comparison with other well-known solutions.
  24. Re: Editorial: Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    I have been reading TSS for probably 5 or 6 years already and, although I don't think it's any of the editor's fault, there used to be much more excitement and controversy going on before. Here is some of my feedback. 1) The content should be more dynamic. I would like to see more news. Sometimes days pass without a single news post. I think there is plenty going on to have about 5 to 10 posts every day. 2) TSS does not post interesting blogs any more. There used to be times where editors frequently would pick an interesting (or controversial) blog entry and stir up a good discussion around it. 3) Where is Mike Spille?!? You guys have to find him and force him to post here from wherever his is hiding ;-) Agree or disagree, his opinions were always strong and his posts were always exciting to read. That said, TSS still remains my number one source for a scoop of technology news every morning. Best, Dmitriy Setrakyan GridGain - Grid Computing Made Simple
  25. KISS[ Go to top ]

    I used to love browsing the news section of this site a few years ago. Being a newbie in the enterprise realm (part-time Java web developer for 4 years, just now getting into enterprise apps), the were many articles that helped me wade through the gobs of new technologies/frameworks/toolkits out there. The fact that the biggest names in the industry posted on here, and there were no "OMG LOL" posts (from people such as myself), made this site one of a kind. However, since I am not progressing along as fast as any of you, the news feed is not much of a resource for me anymore. Actually, I think it's more of a stressor than anything ;) It seems like every post is very specific in nature - and unless I happen to be an expert in that area, I have no clue what the post is actually trying to convey - it makes me feel dumb!
    1) Ask the product announcement posters to identify the trend, marketplace, technology or pattern that they are releasing a product into. For instance, the Open Source Business Library announcement this week was really about Master Data Management (MDM.) MDM means a lot to people with a database background. It could mean a lot to people with an object background (like TSS readers) but the posting didn't cover that at all. The next time I make a PushToTest announcement it should be lead off with "Improvements in Ajax Testing" as opposed to "PushToTest Releases TestMaker 5".
    I completely agree with Frank on this one. I had to read over the "Open Source Business Library" post probably four times, along with looking at their examples, to figure out what it actually does and what purpose it serves. I'm a measly Programmer Analyst who is trying to discover what solution is best for me and my company. I want to know the market trends - what technologies are really taking off and providing REAL VALUE to development teams, while reducing costs and creating robust and easily maintainable web applications? I would like to see more case studies, and not only success stories either. I want to hear about the companies that tried to leverage the latest technology, and the lessons they learned. Maybe this just isn't the place for me :-/ As for the platform - I see no need to upgrade, at least from my end. There is no point in having a fancy interface if it's the content that attracts people.
  26. Suspicious omissions turned me off[ Go to top ]

    Andromda, an open source model driven code generation tool, hasn't had a release on your front page in years. http://galaxy.andromda.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1239&highlight=dion+almaer (see the Nov 23 post by Walter Zoons) It is an excellent product that competes against commercial products that have been advertised on TSS, it looks like your sponsors can suppress coverage on your site.
  27. Andromda, an open source model driven code generation tool, hasn't had a release on your front page in years. [url here] (see the Nov 23 post by Walter Zoons)

    It is an excellent product that competes against commercial products that have been advertised on TSS, it looks like your sponsors can suppress coverage on your site.
    Nope. AndroMDA has had two releases: the one you point out, release 3.1, in 2005, and release 3.2, in November 2006. (They're undergoing tests for 4.0 now.) AndroMDA didn't go on the front page because they haven't had any activity worth posting... and if they had, you're talking two posts in three years. Somehow, I don't think you'd be satisfied. TSS traditionally doesn't post many point releases (3.1, 3.2...) in preference to major releases (3.0, for example.) In the past year, I've relaxed that policy, because a lot of projects don't use major releases the same way any more - thus, what used to be a 4.0 would be a 3.6 now. I'm an open source developer, believe it or not - I don't have a preference for commercial software unless it's actually better. And as far as sponsors telling me what to publish or what not to publish? Utter poppycock. I have a mandate in my company, that says that our sales teams have no control over editorial topics. Same for vendors, incidentally - they can tell me they don't want something published, but if it's something I think is newsworthy, I publish it. Period.
  28. Discussions[ Go to top ]

    Hi Joseph, I am reading TSS for years now and sure InfoQ and JavaLobby look better and they have a lot of interesting content. TSS is a COMMUNITY page in my point of view and this is the real Web 2.0 feature (not AJAX or any other technology) - I like the discussions of the topics - it is really fun and there is a lot of value vor me when people like Bill, Gavin or Cameron discuss very controversy about J2EE, clustering etc. I like InfoQ, but have you seen real discussions there - InfoQ is a good looking news site for me, where TSS is a community site. Just try to get more interesting topics... I don't need AJAX here :-) Mirko
  29. Re: Editorial: Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    I like *very much* the *mixed* format of TSS cover page: * New product releases * References to blogs * Asking opinion about new trends, products or technical issues. * Product X vs Product Y discussions * Industry news with impact to developers (acquisitions etc) * Technical articles * Java centric stuff Other portals separate very much these issues. For instance, another famous portal marginalize product releases to a small corner, most of the time I'm not interested in the concrete version, I usually interested in the *product success* and the trend it is involved, user opinions are very important but as the headline news is so small almost no body cares, no very much posts (usually no post). Another famous portal is focused on blogs. And finally another famous portal is focused in many things, but very few in Java (no very much news). Anyway TSS isn't my only news source. About the focus on Java: I think TSS focus must be in "Java as a platform" covering other JVM based languages, and *sparingly* talking about the competition, how is doing .Net, Ruby, PHP, is Java losing the floor?, integration with other technologies... stuff like these. I hate to say this but sponsored links are marginalized in TSS, I think they should be mixed with content, have I lost my mind? no, if the portal doesn't get revenue the content will be bad. About minor/major releases: most of the time is marketing, in Java the real versioning is 1.0,1.1,...,1.6, Java 2,5,6 is marketing. New features are the important stuff.
  30. Re: Editorial: Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    I'm newer to TSS. What attracted me was the community feel. I like that threads stray off topic: it gives you the sense of a real conversation. I like the more subjective story-telling part of threads because I glean more information about how a technology is used and where the gotcha's are than with strictly a feature list. It's sort of like that gritty neighborhood bar where you sit down next to Joe the plumber, who works for your city, and he fills you in that the latest tests on water purity - being trumpeted by the politicians - were done at the source instead of in the pipes, which are currently leaking lead into the water supply. Sometimes it's also good to just plain find out that many other developers are going through the same frustrations with their organizations. All that said, TSS allows me to keep up with Java- influenced technologies. However, I think the time has come to bring in more information about the MS world. My sense is that they have the same technologies when viewed from a high level, but they have different implementations and a different philosophy about development. I'd like to know more about their server-side technologies and how they interact with Java-influenced ones. Keep up the good work and stay focused on content. A facelift is nice to have but the content keeps people.
  31. Re: Editorial: Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    However, I think the time has come to bring in more information about the MS world. My sense is that they have the same technologies when viewed from a high level, but they have different implementations and a different philosophy about development. I'd like to know more about their server-side technologies and how they interact with Java-influenced ones.
    Hi Bill, Have you checked out http://www.theserverside.net/ ? I don't know how heavily trafficked it is or how active their community is, but you may find it useful. Cheers, Jim
  32. TSS Reader Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    Have you checked out http://www.theserverside.net/ ? I don't know how heavily trafficked it is or how active their community is, but you may find it useful.

    Cheers,
    Jim
    Thanks for the link. I didn't know the site existed. My bad.
  33. Re: Editorial: Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    I think TSS should decide what it really wants to be - News, Blogs, Discussion, Tech Talks, White Papers, Downloads, Patterns, Reviews, Articles. Are all these areas necessary? In my view TSS is about delivering Java enterprise news and industry views and technical articles. Possibly even book reviews. It should focus on that and leave the blogging, discussion forums, downloads etc to those other sites who are better at doing that. Sites like infoq and dzone are good because they focus on a specialisation. Do what you do best and forget the rest, imo. Bloggers will write blogs, forums will discuss, and downalod sites will have the software. TSS is about news, accept that and move the site ahead with that in mind. thanks.
  34. Re: Editorial: Out of Touch[ Go to top ]

    It should focus on that and leave the blogging, discussion forums, downloads etc to those other sites who are better at doing that.
    If it wasn't for the discussion forums I would never come to TSS. The reaction of the community is usually much more interesting and informative than the actual posting. I actually would tolerate a little more noise if it also brought more intelligent discussion.
  35. At JavaOne I saw the phrase "the only side that matters", I think on T-shirts of folks at the Serverside booth. Someone can correct me on where that phrase was displayed. When I saw it I thought "my God, whoever wrote that has his head burried in the sand." I shared this attitude, about 2 years back. That all this AJAX stuff was absurd hype. Well, it ain't. It's an incredibly important programming paradigm that dovetails with the "mashup". So, the clientside certainly matters, and has rising prominence with developers.
  36. It's a pun. The name of the site is, of course, "the server side..." It wasn't meant to be taken literally. JavaPosse had a podcast interview where they brought up the same thing. But I ask: without clientside operations, what's the value of the server? Again, a pun...