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News: Tasktop 1.0 released: Mylyn for the masses

  1. Tasktop 1.0 released: Mylyn for the masses (15 messages)

    Reclaim your workday by Mik Kersten announces the first public release of Tasktop, which brings the productivity benefits of Eclipse Mylyn to all of your work activities.
    Starting today, you will be able to use the Task-Focused Interface for managing all of your work. For Eclipse users, this means the productivity benefits of Mylyn now extend to your file and web browsing activities. For all those who have asked for Mylyn but don’t have the luxury of spending their day in Eclipse, Mylyn’s benefits will now be available to you through a standalone RCP application.
    Screencasts are available that demonstrate the technology implemented as a set of Eclipse plugins for developers and a stand-alone RCP application for those not using Eclipse.The Tasktop website explains some of the key benefits of using the Task-Focused Interface:
    • Switching between tasks becomes a single-click operation - all of your documents, source files and web pages are instantly restored.
    • When used with a shared task repository such as Bugzilla, CollabNet, JIRA, and Rally, Tasktop provides task-focused collaboration, relieving email inbox congestion.
    [Editor's note: In all honesty, Tasktop looks like a really good application built on top of Eclipse. The integration points are really surprisingly nice. The only complaint that this user has is the lack of integration with MAPI sources, so that not only tasks could be tracked in Tasktop, but email as well. That said, it could be that the capability's there, but this bear of little brain couldn't find it. And yes, if you're wondering, my first comparison point was Jetbrains' Omea product.]
  2. Really interesting[ Go to top ]

    Hi, First impression is wonderfull. Hope this will be freeware product. There are lots of pain points in daily usage and this kind of application can make user more producitive. I will give it a try and Hope it will change the way i work.
  3. Re: Really interesting[ Go to top ]

    Hi,
    First impression is wonderfull. Hope this will be freeware product.
    Regarding it being freeware, we have made a deliberate split between the free and open source version of the technology (Eclipse Mylyn) which integrates with other open source technologies built on the Eclipse workbench and server apps such as Bugzilla. Tasktop extends Mylyn to other for-pay technologies such as Microsoft Windows, Office, and the Google tools that you pay for with your eyeballs (i.e. with advertisements). We have priced the Tasktop as low as we could ($40/year for the IDE plug-ins, $60/year for the standalone) but charge for it in order to fund the evolution of the tools, technology and continued efforts in the free and open Mylyn project. One thing I'm really liking about our approach is that we're making all the APIs that Tasktop uses reside in Mylyn. From experience we have learned that in order to evolve to meet various vendors' and projects' needs, the APIs that a growing ecosystem of tools builds on should be open for both reference and contribution.
    There are lots of pain points in daily usage and this kind of application can make user more producitive.

    I will give it a try and Hope it will change the way i work.
    Thanks, that's great to hear and we would love to hear feedback on your first impressions. -- Mik Kersten President & CTO, http://tasktop.com Project Lead, http://eclipse.org/mylyn
  4. Waiting for mail to try[ Go to top ]

    Hi Mike, I registered 7 hours ago and still waiting for mail to try trail version. is this for selected user?
  5. Re: Waiting for mail to try[ Go to top ]

    I registered 7 hours ago and still waiting for mail to try trail version. is this for selected user?
    We've been getting a lot of registrations and our hosting provider's mail system has unfortunately stopped working. We will have a work-around shortly so that new people registering can download, and all others such as yourself will be receiving email with a download link within a couple of hours. Our sincere apologies about the delay in getting you the Tasktop!
  6. Re: Waiting for mail to try[ Go to top ]

    AmitKumar and any others who didn't receive a validation and download email: please note that the problem has been resolved and you should have now received an email with download instructions. I hope that you enjoy the Tasktop and if you have any other questions please send mail to help at tasktop.com.
  7. Hi, I just now installed TaskTop, and already have some misgivings. The complex installation is by far the least of the concerns - however, for a tool that is supposed to simplify your life you sure don't get off on the right foot! The biggest concern I have is that TaskTop wants to be the default browser?! Uh, for someone who does webapps and uses Firefox, Firebug, and related plugins quite heavily it will be interesting to see how that works out. Also, there are some wonderful plugins like ScribeFire and Del.icio.us bookmarks that may be tough to live without. Another problem is that the most prominent link on the TaskTop dashboard takes you to a bugzilla form that CANNOT BE USED. I realized that I could try my TT username & password for Bugzilla, and that worked, but you need better messaging there, I think. I'd also like to know how the plugin and rcp versions differ. I think that it's great that you guys are heavy Eclipse/Mylyn/Tasktop users; how about some best practices? Perhaps something in a blog would be nice, or even a series of more informal Camtasia videos (which are very good ways to communicate, BTW). Thanks Mik and team for making this product. It's something I've been looking for for a long time, and can't wait to start using it in earnest. Regards, Josh
  8. The biggest concern I have is that TaskTop wants to be the default browser?! Uh, for someone who does webapps and uses Firefox, Firebug, and related plugins quite heavily it will be interesting to see how that works out. Also, there are some wonderful plugins like ScribeFire and Del.icio.us bookmarks that may be tough to live without.
    At first we all thought that this was a crazy idea too, but bear with us :) Here's an excerpt from the reply to this question on my blog: ---- Regarding Firefox add-ons, we have to figure out whether to prioritize the support of Firefox and add-on embedding. While most of the world doesn’t, all of us at Tasktop used to browse with Firefox. What we realized is that there was no critical add-on we were using for daily work that couldn’t be provided by some OS widget or other mechanism. There are of course all of the fun add-ons and useful things like the Web Developer toolbar, which is why we made it so easy to pop into Firefox when needed (far right button on browser -> Open in External Browser). For core things like del.icio.ous we plan on providing direct support. ---- Note that setting Tasktop as the default browser is optional, and that even when set it will only be your default browser when it is open. But frankly, for me going back to a plain browser would feel something like like making me go back to working in Emacs. Emacs was great, but once you get used to having structure navigation and integration, you realize how much time is wasted on constant searching and tab/session management. So we're going to continue pushing very hard in this direction, and Eclipse is unique in that it provides us a platform for both the native OS integration and the open source tools and component model needed to make this happen.
    I'd also like to know how the plugin and rcp versions differ.
    The plug-in version will only install into Eclipse and has a some programmer-specific extensions. For example, the Navigator view can show source code projects connected to CVS or SVN. The RCP version differs in that it provides a simplified Eclipse-based application. For example, we did away with the Perspective switcher that Eclipse uses, simplified the menu bar and instead of following Eclipse conventions for where and how things are installed follow Windows conventions.
    I think that it's great that you guys are heavy Eclipse/Mylyn/Tasktop users; how about some best practices? Perhaps something in a blog would be nice, or even a series of more informal Camtasia videos (which are very good ways to communicate, BTW).
    I agree, and we will soon prioritize improving this messaging and publishing best practices. While we've tried hard to give this tool an incremental learning curve, it has taken us a while to become become expert in this way of working and collaborating, and we would really like to compress the novice-to-expert transition for others adopting the tool. Watch the Tasktop blog if you're interested in for best practices and tips.
    Thanks Mik and team for making this product. It's something I've been looking for for a long time, and can't wait to start using it in earnest.
    Thanks for your feedback Josh! Regarding the Bugzilla credentials setting bug you noticed, that should be very rare and will be fixed in the Feb. 19th update. We're excited about continuing to improve and extend the integration to make it accessible to more and more people. If you and others are interested in support that's not there it would be great if you could fill out the survey for what you would like to see added: http://tasktop.com/support/survey/integrations.php
  9. i am talking about the Windows version its a power tools for power users, definitely too complex for the average and not so average user. the interface is ... well, not so friendly either, the idea is very nice thought, i am sure sooner or later someone might come up with a better interface for it
  10. Google notebook will handle 80% of the features present in TaskTop. It only takes a few minutes to set your google notebook for getting things done. Maybe if they weren't charging so much for TaskTop it'd be worth it. There's already too much competition in this space that's free or a nominal fee.
  11. Google notebook will handle 80% of the features present in TaskTop. It only takes a few minutes to set your google notebook for getting things done. Maybe if they weren't charging so much for TaskTop it'd be worth it. There's already too much competition in this space that's free or a nominal fee.
    Maybe I'm missing something, but this point escapes me. Tasktop is about having your all of your tasks accessible in a single list, from the increasingly large number of integrated task repositories coming from multiple vendors (e.g. JIRA, Outlook, Google Code). It then uses a degree-of-interest model to implicitly rank the information you access as part of a task. I'm pretty sure that no other tool does this, and curious if you could point me at any. Google Notebook is a very different tool that I see as complementary to Tasktop and not a replacement. For example, when I'm looking for a hotel room and have added clippings to my notebook, when I go back to that task I have my notebook clippings in front of me instantly, along with any MS Word or Google Docs document that I was accessing. To get a feel for what it's like to use it with Google Notebook, check out the part of the video where you see me accessing Google Docs, or try it yourself: http://tasktop.com/videos/2008-winter/tasktop.html The technologies are complementary and fit very nicely together. Our story is integration and being the glue between various tools, not trying to replace something useful like Google Notebook. One key difference in our approach is that Tasktop gives *you* control of where you want your data stored, whether it's in the cloud, on a shared repository, or local. In addition, the solutions that do provide related features, such as Basecamp, are not free. But again, since our focus is integration I see things like Basecamp as complementary and there has been user interest in having Basecamp tasks accessible within the Task List, which we enable via open source APIs. But you don't need to take our word for it, either you try to use the the tool and speaks for itself, or it doesn't. I just noticed this neat summary of how it can speak for itself once you get hooked on this way of working: http://www.networkworld.com/columnists/2008/021208-dr-internet.html
  12. i am talking about the Windows version its a power tools for power users, definitely too complex for the average and not so average user. the interface is ... well, not so friendly either, the idea is very nice thought, i am sure sooner or later someone might come up with a better interface for it
    The standalone Windows app inherits a lot of the power of Eclipse, and with this power comes some complexity. Over the past couple of months we have started simplifying the user interface of the standalone app and this is a key goal going forward. In the Spring 2008 release you'll see considerable simplification. But regarding someone else coming up with a better interface for it, I am a firm believer in the Task-Focused Desktop interface being built on top of Eclipse. Based on our experiences, there is currently no other technology than can meet the requirements we need: a rich web-enabled and offline caching client that scales to instant access of hundreds of thousands of elements with both web app and native OS integration. The other key reason why I believe that this solution needs to be built on Eclipse is that we're relying on an ecosystem of open and closed source tools extending these ideas. Eclipse supports such an ecosystem and has a great component model for plugging in third party solutions while providing a consistent and native UI. Check back with the Spring 2008 and Summer 2008 releases to watch progress in the tricky task of simplifying the UI further while retaining the power and control that existing Tasktop users rely on.
  13. Congratulations, It sure looks very impressive.
    Switching between tasks becomes a single-click operation - all of your documents, source files and web pages are instantly restored.
    I do see some value in linking say a Use Case / Requirements Document with code realization. Can you perhaps give us a realistic scenario on how a regular corporate Java programmer could benefit from this platform? What is your target audience? Technical Writer/Analysts types or Coders?
  14. Congratulations,
    It sure looks very impressive.
    Thanks! Myself and others at Tasktop have been doing all of our work in this tool since the very early prototypes we had over a year ago, so it's very exciting to finally be able to share it.
    I do see some value in linking say a Use Case / Requirements Document with code realization. Can you perhaps give us a realistic scenario on how a regular corporate Java programmer could benefit from this platform?

    What is your target audience? Technical Writer/Analysts types or Coders?
    Regarding the target audience, your guesses are correct. One of our key priorities is supporting programmers using Mylyn who want the task list and the task context model to extend to their other work activities. We have also had a lot of interest from programmers not using Eclipse, which was one of the things that drove the standalone application. If there were sufficient interest, we could even provide plug-ins to other IDEs like IDEA for some basic integration, such as the ability to click hyperlinks in the task editor and have that jump to source lines in your IDE, so vote if you're interested in that. But what's very exciting to us is extending this way of working to all the roles that are part of the software development company that are not programming. For example, managers have asked for the Task List's offline capabilities along with access to web documents and task repositories like CollabNet, JIRA and Rally, and Tasktop provides that. Regarding use cases and requirements, it depends which tool you use. If you use a desktop application or Eclipse-based tool, you will probably want a Mylyn connector for that tool unless you only need navigation to and from use cases on the file level. If you use a web-based tool, you get most of the integration for free since Tasktop works for web pages and anchors within web documents. For example, on the Mylyn project we keep all the documentation that's not in Bugzilla on Eclipsepedia. As I code, if I updated a use case that's a section in a wiki page, and use case becomes a part of my task context. Then, if another contributor wants to pick up where I left off they simply activate the task and they will instantly see the source code and wiki documents that I was referring to. Another neat thing is that if you click on a hyperlink on a wiki task or use case it opens with the rich editor within Tasktop, since Tasktop checks if it has a rich editor and offline copy before opening certain URLs. For example, I have some high level requirements listed in an Excel spreadsheet that I was using for brainstorming. I made those links to tasks in Bugzilla by putting in the hyperlinks. Then, when I work on the plane I can click the hyperlinks in Excel and have them instantly open the corresponding tasks within Tasktop. URLs are an great standard that we make extensive use of in Tasktop's rich browsing facilities. -- Mik Kersten President & CTO, http://tasktop.com Project Lead, http://eclipse.org/mylyn
  15. Hire an unemployed voiceover actor[ Go to top ]

    Looks like an interesting product and I'll probably check it out as soon as a Mac version is available, but really you should hire someone with a better voice to read the script for the screencasts. No offense, I'm sure Mik is a fine programmer, but his voice is weird and distracting.
  16. ..but really you should hire someone with a better voice to read the script for the screencasts.
    Point taken and I appreciate the feedback. While my voice works well enough for frequent conference talks, and I seems to hold up in webinars, webcasts of this sort are a different beast. I'd like to blame it on not learning English until I was 10, but instead I blame it on the weird medium of speaking to yourself in repeatedly recorded short bursts ;) On the flipside, a few years ago I developed an allergy to webcasts about technical matters coming from non-programmers. I did a stint at Intentional Software helping Charles Simonyi work on the UI for that programming environment, and my first introduction to the technology had been the Intentional Programming video. The budget for that video was significant and the woman who presents it is a very eloquent and accomplished newscaster. But while I knew the technology that I was watching in the video was really neat, as a programmer I was distracted the entire time by thinking that the person speaking had no familiarity or interest in the technology. Since that time my preference has been to hear the people who know what they're doing present the subject matter. I find that when programmers sound excited about something they're saying I know that they're not acting, they really are excited about it. I'm wondering what others think about this, and perhaps for some short advertisement type videos a trained and eloquent voice-over really is better. And yes, I'd much rather be programming than recording webcasts :)