Flux adds File Transfer Support to JavaScript Widget

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News: Flux adds File Transfer Support to JavaScript Widget

  1. Flux has announced the release of Flux 7.7, which allows you to easily design, export, monitor, and edit running jobs and workflows all from your own Web application, embedded with a Javascript widget. Flux is an embeddable commercial Java job scheduler, file transfer, workflow and business process management (BPM) engine with supporting JavaScript widgets. Flux 7.7 gives you the added capability to add rich web-based workflow functionality to your web applications. The Flux engine executes all workflows, while the Workflow Designer JavaScript widget lets you quickly add Web 2.0 workflow design capabilities to your web application. Users can now design and monitor thousands of workflows that wait for incoming files, transfer files to remote systems, execute system commands, or call Web services all from your web application. The ability to visually monitor thousands of workflows in real-time, from within the Flux web user interface or your custom web user interface, is important because developers and IT operations staff need to know where their jobs and workflows stand. Traditional desktop applications don't match up with the current runtime environment as well as web applications do, even on intranets. With registration, you can download Flux 7.7, and try it on your own box under a thirty-day trial. Flux has a key features in Flux 7.7 page that offers detail on the updates and core features. Flux is a commercial product; contact Flux sales for licensing details on a per-customer basis.

    Threaded Messages (4)

  2. Development and Test Licenses These licenses are available in scenarios that include development, testing, quality assurance, UAT, and staging.
    Is creating job(s) that call some shell scripts considered development? If so, then it seems that you will need to buy a development and runtime license. Pretty strange for a job scheduling engine.
  3. Is creating job(s) that call some shell scripts considered
    development? If so, then it seems that you will need to buy a development and runtime license. Pretty strange for a job scheduling engine. A development license is not required. You can simply purchase a production license and start scheduling jobs. Our web based interfaces make this very easy too. You can run the Flux engine as a Linux daemon and deploy the flux.war to any servlet container, or use Jetty that is bundled with Flux. You can then create workflows that schedule shell scripts for execution and monitor the workflows from your web browser. Flux supports the basic cron syntax (can import crontab files) as well as many extended scheduling options that are not available in cron. Our customers are typically Java developers who are building Java based applications and are embedding Flux to handle enterprise job scheduling, workflow, file transfer, and BPM. So, we usually sell development licenses with each sale just due to the typical customer scenario, this is the norm, but not a requirement. -Allison
  4. Thanks for the answer[ Go to top ]

    but if you can please detail the benefits of the development license over simply buying the runtime license. We are not interested in writing plug ins for your product. We just want to schedule jobs (basic work flows) and be able to monitor progress. Thank you very much.
  5. but if you can please detail the benefits of the development license over simply buying the runtime license.
    If you want to have Flux instances running in a non-runtime capacity (such as for Java application development), a development license is nice because it costs less than a runtime license. That's the essence of the benefit of a development license over a runtime license. In your case, it doesn't sound like you would need anything but a runtime license. However, most Flux users are Java developers who want to have Flux instances running on their development and testing computers. For their needs, a development license is better because it costs less and does not need to be a full-blown runtime license. -Allison