Discussions

News: Apache MyFaces Orchestra 1.1 released, with simpler configuration

  1. Apache MyFaces Orchestra 1.1, a library which enables your web application to use conversation scopes, has been released. While created under the MyFaces umbrella, Orchestra also allows you to provide this scope to non-JSF web frameworks. By providing your own FrameworkAdapter you should be able to use virtually any presentation or non-presentation framework you would like to. For example, a LocalFrameworkAdapter is used to make Orchestra work in a test framework without any servlet engine or JSF environment at all. The new release offers a simplified setup, so in an JSF environment you do not have to deal with the web.xml setup any more. In Spring the conversation-scoped beans do not have to have the aop:scoped-proxy marker anymore. Facelets support has also been added. Also, the "flash" scope has been renamed to "access" scope which reflects more what this scope really does. A conversation in "access" scope lives as long as you access a bean during the JSF render phase. The scopes in Orchestra can be configured to synchronize the lifetime of the persistence context with the lifetime of the conversation (in other words, a persistence context can be made part of the scope's entire lifecycle.) It is up to you how a conversation scope behaves. You even can mix scopes in one application. Orchestra is very flexible in how it can be integrated in your existing application. If you already use Spring you should be able to jump-start conversation scoping - no need to rewrite the whole application. And if you're not using Spring, it would be a good idea to start. In Orchestra the annotations are just an add-on in the core15 module. This module has not been released yet, but after some restructuring of this module we will be able to do so very soon. However, using annotations for defining conversation scoped beans is already provided by Spring. So, stay tuned for more to come!
  2. I find it a bit amusing how people are trying to paper over the cracks in defective frameworks such as JSF by providing more and more ways of "scoping" conversations. What's wrong with just passing objects around in a fully stateful framework, like Wicket? Problem solved.
  3. I find it a bit amusing how people are trying to paper over the cracks in defective frameworks such as JSF by providing more and more ways of "scoping" conversations.

    What's wrong with just passing objects around in a fully stateful framework, like Wicket? Problem solved.
    Are you sure it is the same thing? Can you have a timeout? Can you say, in a declarative way, if you are accessing an illegal conversation (already closed) redirect to page x? Can you open multiple conversation with the same name? For example open 3 window to update 3 entities simultaneously. Can you attach a conversational scoped EntityManager to your bean? Maybe yes..I don't know wicket.
  4. I find it a bit amusing how people are trying to paper over the cracks in defective frameworks such as JSF by providing more and more ways of "scoping" conversations.

    What's wrong with just passing objects around in a fully stateful framework, like Wicket? Problem solved.


    Are you sure it is the same thing?
    Can you have a timeout? Can you say, in a declarative way, if you are accessing an illegal conversation (already closed) redirect to page x?
    Can you open multiple conversation with the same name? For example open 3 window to update 3 entities simultaneously.
    Can you attach a conversational scoped EntityManager to your bean?

    Maybe yes..I don't know wicket.
    I have the same feeling here, ok I dont know wicket good enough, but I assume it is either a savestate mechanism like JSF has or some kind of simple flash scope which allows to store data in the session for certain period of times. I assume either, that it does not have any binding into the middle layer, while most other currently existing conversation systems either bind into spring or ejb3 and add the conversation scope there, and probably does not have any transactional control either. Which all other conversation systems also allow. But speaking of conversation systems, most of them if not all of them are not bound to jsf anymore (while many of them come from the jsf side), Seam, Spring Webflow, Orchestra (which is more a conversation provider than a full blown system) all of them work in any webframework if configured correctly.